24 results in English
Illustrated Guide of Tilling and Weaving: Rural Life in China
This book is comprised of 23 illustrations of tilling and 23 illustrations of weaving, each of which is accompanied by a poem. According to the "Preface to the imperially commissioned illustrations of tilling and weaving" and the formal memorandum of presentation by Yan Yudun, the poems were inscribed by the Kangxi Emperor. The painter, Jiao Bingzhen, for the most part draws on the “Tilling and Weaving Illustrations" by the early Southern Song painter Lou Shou, making adjustments to produce these pictures, which are masterpieces of art, notable for their vivacity ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Lucreaty Clark Weaving a White Oak Basket
Lucreaty J. Clark was born in 1904 in Lamont, Florida. She continued the craft of making white oak baskets, which she learned from her mother and father. Her parents originally made these sturdy baskets for use on the plantation where they lived and worked in north Florida, an area where white oaks are plentiful. The baskets were used to hold cotton and carry vegetables. Before making baskets, Clark would select a tree of the right size and, once cut down, would split the logs into thin strips or “splits.” White ...
Phelonion Vestment. From the Time of Tsar Mikhail Feodorovich. In the Vestry of the Assumption Cathedral. Rostov Velikii
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Phelonion Vestment Dating to 1635 and Belonging to Metropolitan Varlaam. In the Vestry of the Assumption Cathedral in the Kremlin. Rostov Velikii
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Linen Phelonion Vestment of Great Antiquity with Printed Pattern on the Shoulders and Hem, with a Distinctive Cut. Museum Inventory Number 130. In the Rostov Museum. Rostov Velikii
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Nankeen Phelonion Vestment from the End of the Seventeenth Century. Museum Inventory Number 1936. In the Rostov Museum. Rostov Velikii
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Phelonion Vestment from the Second Half of the Eighteenth Century, from a Very Old Fabric Called Kamka Silk Brocade with Shoulders Embroidered with Pearls on Crimson Velvet. In the Rostov Museum. Rostov Velikii
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Phelonion Vestment. Pereiaslavl-Zalesskii
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Phelonian Vestment. A Gift from Tsarina Anastasia Romanov. Pereiaslavl-Zalesskii
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Surplice Sewn by Tsarevnas, the Sisters of Peter the Great. Trinity Monastery, Aleksandrov
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Surplice Sewn by Tsarevnas, the Sisters of Peter the Great. Trinity Monastery, Aleksandrov
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Display of Embroidered Cloth and Woven Sashes
Torzhok is among the oldest settlements in central Russia. Referred to in written sources as early as 1139, it is situated on the Tvertsa River, some 60 kilometers to the west of Tver. Its favorable location made it a place of active commerce (the name Torzhok comes from the word for trading site). After the founding of Saint Petersburg in 1703, Torzhok saw a revival of its fortunes, as the town became a transfer point for supplies moving to the new imperial capital. By the turn of the 19th century ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Display of Embroidered Cloth and Pouch
Torzhok is among the oldest settlements in central Russia. Referred to in written sources as early as 1139, it is situated on the Tvertsa River, some 60 kilometers to the west of Tver. Its favorable location made it a place of active commerce (the name Torzhok comes from the word for trading site). After the founding of Saint Petersburg in 1703, Torzhok saw a revival of its fortunes, as the town became a transfer point for supplies moving to the new imperial capital. By the turn of the 19th century ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Display of Patterned and Embroidered Cloth
Torzhok is among the oldest settlements in central Russia. Referred to in written sources as early as 1139, it is situated on the Tvertsa River, some 60 kilometers to the west of Tver. Its favorable location made it a place of active commerce (the name Torzhok comes from the word for trading site). After the founding of Saint Petersburg in 1703, Torzhok saw a revival of its fortunes, as the town became a transfer point for supplies moving to the new imperial capital. By the turn of the 19th century ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Display of Embroidered Cloth with Label in Russian
Tver is an ancient city (first mentioned in 1135) on the Volga River to the northwest of Moscow. Opened in 1866, the Tver Museum displayed natural and archeological items of interest as well as works of art and crafts from the region of Tver. Seen here is an elaborately-embroidered oplechye (shoulder cloth) for a phelonion (liturgical vestment), similar to a chasuble and worn over the priest’s other vestments. The inscription proclaims that the oplechye was a gift of Mikhail Fedorovich, the first Romanov tsar. In 1897 the Tver Museum ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Display of Embroidered Cloth and Pouches
Torzhok is among the oldest settlements in central Russia. Referred to in written sources as early as 1139, it is situated on the Tvertsa River, some 60 kilometers to the west of Tver. Its favorable location made it a place of active commerce (the name Torzhok comes from the word for trading site). After the founding of Saint Petersburg in 1703, Torzhok saw a revival of its fortunes, as the town became a transfer point for supplies moving to the new imperial capital. By the turn of the 19th century ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Luce Ben Aben School of Arab Embroidery I, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the interior of a school of embroidery in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). In 1845 the Frenchwoman Eugénie Luce (1804–82) opened a school for Muslim girls in Algiers that was intended to educate local girls along European lines. She included teaching needlework in the curriculum, along with French and other subjects. In 1861 the French Algerian administration withdrew funding from the school. The emphasis of the school shifted from general ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Luce Ben Aben School of Arab Embroidery II, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the interior of a school of embroidery in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). In 1845 the Frenchwoman Eugénie Luce (1804–82) opened a school for Muslim girls in Algiers that was intended to educate local girls along European lines. She included teaching needlework in the curriculum, along with French and other subjects. In 1861 the French Algerian administration withdrew funding from the school. The emphasis of the school shifted from general ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Moorish Women Making Arab Carpets, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of women making carpets in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Carpets in Algeria traditionally were made by women, woven or knotted from wool or goat hair, and often formed the most important decorative element in a home. In the late 19th century, traditional female crafts in Algeria, such as weaving, embroidery, and carpet making, suffered from the competition with machine-made imports, but beautiful handmade carpets still found a ready market in Algeria ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Interior of a Home on the Beach at Boquerones, Province of Barbacoas
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows the interior of a beachfront home and its inhabitants and possibly guests. On the right, a marimba hangs from the ceiling. The painting is set in what was then Barbacoas Province, in the far southwest of Colombia near the border with Ecuador. In 1853, when the picture was painted, Barbacoas Province stretched from the Pacific lowlands up to the mountains of the Cordillera Occidental. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of Colombia ...
Poncho Weaver in Cali, Province of Buenaventura
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows a man making woolen ruanas (ponchos) on a large foot-pedaled loom. Weaving of this kind was one of the most important crafts of the Indians of the Cordillera Occidental, in the Andean region in Colombia. In 1853, when Paz painted the picture, Cali was in the province of Buenaventura; it is now the capital of Valle del Cauca Department. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of Colombia and depicted the daily activities ...
Weaver, Pasto Province
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820-1902) depicts a colorfully clad woman as she weaves, probably making a poncho, as evidenced from the striped pattern and colors. Pasto Province (present-day Nariño Department) is in the southwestern-most part of Colombia. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of Colombia and depicted the daily activities and traditional customs of the country’s different ethnic, racial, and social groups. Paz was born in Almaguer in the province of Cauca. He joined the Colombian army at ...
Women Spinning Wool, Pasto Province
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows two Amerindian women in Pasto Province (present-day Nariño Department), in southwest Columbia. Sitting cross legged or on low stools, the women would have been spinning wool to make the warm clothing essential to survival in the high Andean mountains. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of Colombia and depicted the daily activities and traditional customs of the country’s different ethnic, racial, and social groups. Paz was born in Almaguer in the ...
Woman Spinning Cotton, Túquerres Province
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows a scene in Túquerres Province (present-day Nareño Department), southwest Colombia. A woman is spinning cotton, while a man in a poncho looks on. The local economy in this elevated region of the Andean cordillera was at this time mainly based on agriculture and the manufacture of cotton and wool textiles. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of Colombia and depicted the daily activities and traditional customs of the country’s different ethnic ...