25 results in English
Field of Santana
The Thereza Christina Maria collection is composed of 21,742 photos assembled by Emperor Pedro II (1825-91) throughout his life and donated by him to the National Library of Brazil. The collection covers a wide variety of subjects. It documents the achievements of Brazil and Brazilians in the 19th century and also includes many photographs of Europe, Africa, and North America. This field, photographed by Rafael Castro y Ordonez during the Scientific Commission of the Pacific in 1862, has at various times been known as the Field of Santana, Republic ...
Public Promenade: View 1
The Thereza Christina Maria collection is composed of 21,742 photos assembled by Emperor Pedro II (1825-91) throughout his life and donated by him to the National Library of Brazil. The collection covers a wide variety of subjects. It documents the achievements of Brazil and Brazilians in the 19th century and also includes many photographs of Europe, Africa, and North America. The Passeio Publico, which was built in 1779 and opened to the public in 1793, is the oldest park in Brazil and one of the oldest in the Americas ...
Botanical Garden: Avenue of Imperial Palms
The Thereza Christina Maria collection is composed of 21,742 photos assembled by Emperor Pedro II (1825-91) throughout his life and donated by him to the National Library of Brazil. The collection covers a wide variety of subjects. It documents the achievements of Brazil and Brazilians in the 19th century and also includes many photographs of Europe, Africa, and North America. The Botanical Garden of Rio de Janeiro was founded in 1808 by King John VI of Portugal and opened to the public in 1822. It remains one of the ...
Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Competition Drawing
The Vietnam Veterans Memorial, originally designed as a student project by Maya Lin for her degree at Yale University Architectural School, has become a profound national symbol and a seminal piece of American monumental architecture. Undertaken to heal a nation torn apart by the controversial war, the competition attracted proposals from thousands of veterans and architects. Lin envisioned a black granite wall, in the shape of a V, on which the names of the American military dead and missing would be inscribed. The architect hoped that "these names, seemingly infinite ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Norwegian Carriage, Hardanger Fjord, Norway
This photochrome print of a Norwegian girl in a carriage at Hardanger Fjord in Norway is part of “Landscape and Marine Views of Norway” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. In his Peeps at Many Lands: Norway (1909) the British travel writer A.F. Ferryman-Mockler observed that "all that is grand, all that is beautiful, will be found in the Hardanger.” The fjord, located in southern Norway, is approximately five kilometers miles wide at its center and more than 650 meters deep in some places. The fjord is ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
View in the Kungsparken, Malmo, Sweden
This photochrome print of the popular Kungsparken (King’s Park) in Malmö is part of “Landscape and Marine Views of Norway and Sweden” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. The park was designed by the Danish architect O. Høegh Hansen, and opened in 1872. Hansen’s design reflected French and Austrian influences of the 1850s and evoked both the romantic and baroque styles. Malmö is located in southern Sweden, just across Oresund Strait from Denmark. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Ovrelerfos, Trondhjem, Norway
This photochrome print from the “Landscape and Marine Views of Norway” section in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company shows a noted tourist destination in Norway as it would have appeared in the last decade of the 19th century. The Lille (Lower) Lerfos and Store (Upper) Lerfos are picturesque waterfalls on the Nid River, several kilometers south of the city of Trondheim. The 1892 edition of Baedeker’s Norway, Sweden and Denmark: Handbook for Travellers advised that the best view of the falls “is from one of the windows ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
At the Estate. Denmark
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
At the Estate. Denmark
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Champs de Mars, Exposition Universal, 1900, Paris, France
This photochrome print of the Champs de Mars in Paris is part of “Views of Architecture, Monuments, and Other Sites in France” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The Champs de Mars stretches between the Eiffel Tower and the imposing Ecole Militaire in Paris’s Seventh Arrondissement (district). The 1900 edition of Baedeker's Paris and its Environs, with routes from London to Paris: Handbook for Travellers described the park as “a large sandy space, 1100 yds. in length and 550 yds. in breadth,” which until 1889 ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Tuileries Garden, Paris, France
This photochrome print of the Jardin des Tuileries in Paris is part of “Views of Architecture, Monuments, and Other Sites in France” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Located next to the palace of Louvre, the Tuileries is the site of a palace and royal residence with a large garden originally built for Catherine de Medici in 1564. During the reign of Louis XIV, the celebrated landscape gardener André Le Nôtre (1613–1700) laid out the basic features of the garden, which included a grand allée that ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Peterhof from Castle, St. Petersburg, Russia
This photochrome print of the palace of Peterhof in St. Petersburg is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Based on a design by the French architect Alexandre Jean-Baptiste LeBlond (1679–1719), Peterhof is regarded as the Russian Versailles. It was built by Peter the Great (1672–1725) as a summer residence. Located on the shore of the Neva Bay (or Gulf of Kronstadt), the palace offers a view of Kronstadt, the city ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Place Iljinka, (i.e., Il'inka), Moscow, Russia
This photochrome print of Place Ilinka in Moscow is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites Primarily in Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Place Ilinka is located in Kitai-Gorod, an area near Red Square. As described in Baedeker’s Russia with Teheran, Port Arthur, and Peking (1914), “[the] central and main street of the Kitai-Gorod, almost exclusively occupied by wholesale houses and banks, is named the Ilyinka.” Kitai-Gorod was one of Moscow’s commercial centers, as evidenced by the construction ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Bashkir Kitchen Garden. Ekhia
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Cape Zelenyi in Batum. In Baratov's Garden. Study
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
In the Monastery's Garden. Novyi Afon
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Type of Dacha on a Cultivated Lot
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Rosa Gustav Grunewald. Hybrid Tea Rose
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Settlement of Nikolaevka. A Settler's Kitchen Garden. Mugan Steppe
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
In Little Russia i.e. Ukraine
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Map Showing the Portions of the City of New York and Westchester County under the Jurisdiction of the Department of Public Parks
This map was made in 1870 during a time of great change for the New York City parks. A group of corrupt politicians, known as the Tweed Ring after William “Boss” Tweed, abruptly replaced the Board of Commissioners of Central Park with a new city agency, the Department of Public Parks. The new parks commissioner, Peter B. Sweeny, then fired designer of Central Park Frederick Law Olmsted, Calvert Vaux, and Andrew Haswell Green, the park comptroller. Tweed and Sweeny, along with the other key ring members, Mayor Abraham Oakey Hall ...
General View of Laurel Hill Cemetery
In the 1830s, a group of influential Philadelphians wanted to establish a rural cemetery that would be naturalistic, serene, and in genteel seclusion. They settled on Laurel Hill at 3822 Ridge Avenue, the former estate of merchant Joseph Sims, which had rocky bluffs and spectacular views and was about six kilometers from the city center. The cemetery, built in 1836–39 after the designs of Scottish-born architect and landscape designer John Notman, is seen in this bird's-eye view of part of the grounds. This view shows horse-drawn carriages and ...
General View of Laurel Hill Cemetery
In the 1830s, a group of influential Philadelphians wanted to establish a rural cemetery that would be naturalistic, serene, and in genteel seclusion. They settled on Laurel Hill at 3822 Ridge Avenue, the former estate of merchant Joseph Sims, which had rocky bluffs and spectacular views and was about six kilometers from the city center. The cemetery was built in 1836–39 after the designs of Scottish-born architect and landscape designer John Notman. In the foreground, horse-drawn carriages approach the main gate (visible at left) of the cemetery, which contains ...
Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia
In the 1830s, a group of influential Philadelphians wanted to establish a rural cemetery that would be naturalistic, serene, and in genteel seclusion. They settled on Laurel Hill at 3822 Ridge Avenue, the former estate of merchant Joseph Sims, which had rocky bluffs and spectacular views and was about six kilometers from the city center. The cemetery was built in 1836–39 after the designs of Scottish-born architect and landscape designer John Notman. This view shows the main gate. A man on horseback rides past the cemetery, in which the ...
Woodlands Cemetery. Main Entrance
This print shows the arched gateway entrance to the Woodlands Cemetery. The cemetery was chartered in 1840 on the former estate of botanist William Hamilton at 3900 Woodland Avenue in West Philadelphia. The view includes the classical entrance arch and two families, one entering and one exiting, both attired in black. The entranceway, built after the designs of John McArthur, Jr., was razed in 1936. McArthur was the architect of some of Philadelphia’s most important Civil War-era buildings. The print, by James Fuller Queen, a Philadelphia lithographer and pioneer ...