9 results in English
Spinner in Vivian Cotton Mills, Cherryville, North Carolina: Been at it Two Years. Where Will Her Good Looks Be in Ten Years?
This image of a young girl working in a North Carolina textile mill in the early 20th century is from the Records of the National Child Labor Committee (NCLC) at the Library of Congress. The photograph is attributed to Lewis W. Hine (1874-1940), one of the leading American documentary photographers of the Progressive Era. Best known for his photography of urban social conditions in New York City, Hine also investigated conditions at cotton mills across the Carolina Piedmont. Working with the Reverend Alfred E. Seddon and journalist A.H. Ulm ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Woman Weaving (Lauhala Weaver)
This photograph of a woman engaged in lauhala weaving is from the state of Hawaii in the United States. Lauhala is the traditional Hawaiian art of weaving the leaves of the hala (or pandanus) tree. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of life and culture in the Americas. Many of the photographs were taken by prominent photographers on OAS missions to member countries. The OAS was established in April 1948 when 21 ...
Imperial Comments Concerning Illustrations of the Cotton Industry
This book is comprised of paintings by Fang Guancheng, with illustrations and text facing each other. The text is the same as in Fang’s memorial (on the cotton industry); the illustrations are slightly different. The first volume contains eight pictures, from “Planting” to “Ginning;” the second volume contains another eight pictures, from “Fluffing the Cotton” to “Bleaching and Dyeing.”
Contributed by Library of Congress
Cotton Textile Mill Interior, Probably in Tashkent
Cotton was an essential raw material for the large textile mills of the Russian Empire, which underwent rapid industrialization in the late 19th-early 20th century. Russian authorities made concerted efforts to find sufficiently warm areas in the empire for the cultivation of this crop. Shown here is a row of cotton gins (for separating the cotton fibers from the seed bolls) at the factory on the estate of Murgab near Bayramaly (present-day Turkmenistan). On the tile floor are mounds of cotton bolls ready to be fed into the gins. The ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Cotton Textile Mill Interior, Probably in Tashkent
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Cotton Textile Mill Interior, Probably in Tashkent
Cotton was an essential raw material for the large textile mills of the Russian Empire, which underwent rapid industrialization in the late 19th-early 20th century. Russian authorities made concerted efforts to find sufficiently warm areas in the empire for the cultivation of this crop. Shown here is a cotton bale press at the estate of Murgab near Bayramaly (present-day Turkmenistan). On the left is an example of a finished cotton bale. The Murgab Oasis was incorporated into the Russian Empire through negotiations in 1884. The oasis takes its name from ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Potter & Carmichael, Oil Cloth Manufacturers. Warehouse, Number 135, North Third Street, Philadelphia
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the busy factory complex on Second Street above the Reading Railroad (i.e., 135 North Third Street above Race Street). A "Franklin-ville, Oilcloth Works" sign tops the roof of the main factory building around which workers stretch cloth on long flat racks. Cloth is also stretched down the sides of buildings. Other men move a roll of carpet into a hatch, load materials into ...
Bridesburg Machine Works. Alfred Jenks and Son, Manufacturers of Cotton and Wool Carding, Spinning, and Weaving Machinery, Shafting and Millgearing
This advertisement shows the busy industrial complex of Alfred Jenks & Son, located on the east side of Richmond Street between Franklin and Locust Streets in Bridesburg, Philadelphia. The firm was established circa 1819 by Alfred Jenks and enlarged in 1853. A horse-drawn flatbed truck enters the courtyard of the U-shaped complex containing several buildings surrounded by wood fencing. Within the yard, clusters of workers transport boxes and planks of wood. Outside the complex, a driver handles a four-horse team pulling a truck loaded with two large machines, as other factory ...
Alfred Jenks and Son's Machine Works, Bridesburg
This illustration shows the busy industrial complex of Alfred Jenks & Son, located on the east side of Richmond Street between Franklin and Locust streets in Bridesburg, Philadelphia. The firm was established circa 1819 by Alfred Jenks and enlarged in 1853. A horse-drawn flatbed truck enters the courtyard of the U-shaped complex containing several buildings surrounded by wood fencing. Within the yard, clusters of workers transport boxes and planks of wood. Outside the complex, a driver handles a four-horse team pulling a truck loaded with two large machines, as other factory ...