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17 results
Spinner in Vivian Cotton Mills, Cherryville, N.C.: Been at it 2 years. Where will her good looks be in ten years?
This image of a young girl working in a North Carolina textile mill in the early 20th century is from the Records of the National Child Labor Committee (NCLC) at the Library of Congress. The photograph is attributed to Lewis W. Hine (1874-1940), one of the leading American documentary photographers of the Progressive Era. Best known for his photography of urban social conditions in New York City, Hine also investigated conditions at cotton mills across the Carolina Piedmont. Working with the Reverend Alfred E. Seddon and journalist A.H. Ulm ...
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Library of Congress
Woman Weaving (Lauhala Weaver)
This photograph of a woman engaged in lauhala weaving is from the state of Hawaii in the United States. Lauhala is the traditional Hawaiian art of weaving the leaves of the hala (or pandanus) tree. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of life and culture in the Americas. Many of the photographs were taken by prominent photographers on OAS missions to member countries. The OAS was established in April 1948 when 21 ...
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Columbus Memorial Library, Organization of American States
Imperial Comments Concerning Illustrations of the Cotton Industry
This book is comprised of paintings by Fang Guancheng, with illustrations and text facing each other. The text is the same as in Fang’s memorial (on the cotton industry); the illustrations are slightly different. The first volume contains eight pictures, from “Planting” to “Ginning;” the second volume contains another eight pictures, from “Fluffing the Cotton” to “Bleaching and Dyeing.”
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Library of Congress
View of Podporozhe. Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress
Rescue Station on Onega Lake. Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress
View of the Sawmill. Kovzha. Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Monument to Emperor Aleksandr II, Commemorating the Completion of the Mariinskii System. Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress
Woodcutters on the Svir River. Russian Empire
The Volga-Baltic Waterway (formerly called the Mariinsk Canal System) links Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin. The Vytegra River was an important component of the Mariinsk System, because it connected to other bodies of water that eventually led to the Volga River basin. The caption of this 1909 photograph states that these are woodcutters on the Svir River, but  similar photographs in this collection suggest that the location is near the point where the Vytegra River empties into Lake Onega. Shown here are carefully trimmed and sawn sections of ...
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Library of Congress
Sawmill on the Kumsa River near the Medvezhia Gora Station
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Sawmill. Oka River
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Log Sawing. Kuzminskoe
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Cotton Textile Mill Interior, Probably in Tashkent
Cotton was an essential raw material for the large textile mills of the Russian Empire, which underwent rapid industrialization in the late 19th-early 20th century. Russian authorities made concerted efforts to find sufficiently warm areas in the empire for the cultivation of this crop. Shown here is a row of cotton gins (for separating the cotton fibers from the seed bolls) at the factory on the estate of Murgab near Bayramaly (present-day Turkmenistan). On the tile floor are mounds of cotton bolls ready to be fed into the gins. The ...
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Library of Congress
Cotton Textile Mill Interior, Probably in Tashkent
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Cotton Textile Mill Interior, Probably in Tashkent
Cotton was an essential raw material for the large textile mills of the Russian Empire, which underwent rapid industrialization in the late 19th-early 20th century. Russian authorities made concerted efforts to find sufficiently warm areas in the empire for the cultivation of this crop. Shown here is a cotton bale press at the estate of Murgab near Bayramaly (present-day Turkmenistan). On the left is an example of a finished cotton bale. The Murgab Oasis was incorporated into the Russian Empire through negotiations in 1884. The oasis takes its name from ...
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Library of Congress
Taylor and Teese, Saddlers, and A. R. Chambers, Currier, 67 and 69 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia
This lithographic advertisement shows the four-story adjacent storefronts for Andrew R. Chambers, leather dealer, and Taylor & Teese, saddlers, at 67−69 (now 223−25) Chestnut Street in Philadelphia. Signage for the businesses, the street numbers, and a drain pipe marked "1832" adorn the building. Merchandise fills the display windows of Taylor & Teese and the sidewalk in front of the store is piled up with a stack of trunks, a harness, saddles, and a feedbag. Rolled merchandise is also visible through the open doorway of Chambers. Taylor & Teese and Chambers were ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Bridesburg Machine Works. Alfred Jenks and Son, Manufacturers of Cotton and Wool Carding, Spinning, and Weaving Machinery, Shafting and Millgearing
This advertisement shows the busy industrial complex of Alfred Jenks & Son, located on the east side of Richmond Street between Franklin and Locust Streets in Bridesburg, Philadelphia. The firm was established circa 1819 by Alfred Jenks and enlarged in 1853. A horse-drawn flatbed truck enters the courtyard of the U-shaped complex containing several buildings surrounded by wood fencing. Within the yard, clusters of workers transport boxes and planks of wood. Outside the complex, a driver handles a four-horse team pulling a truck loaded with two large machines, as other factory ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Alfred Jenks and Son's Machine Works, Bridesburg
This illustration shows the busy industrial complex of Alfred Jenks & Son, located on the east side of Richmond Street between Franklin and Locust streets in Bridesburg, Philadelphia. The firm was established circa 1819 by Alfred Jenks and enlarged in 1853. A horse-drawn flatbed truck enters the courtyard of the U-shaped complex containing several buildings surrounded by wood fencing. Within the yard, clusters of workers transport boxes and planks of wood. Outside the complex, a driver handles a four-horse team pulling a truck loaded with two large machines, as other factory ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia