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20 results
Mr. Vidigal's Diamond Mine in the Jequitinhonha River (Removing Gravel)
The Thereza Christina Maria Collection consists of 21,742 photographs assembled by Emperor Pedro II and left by him to the National Library of Brazil. The collection covers a vast range of subjects. It documents the achievements of Brazil and the Brazilian people in the 19th century, as well as includes many photographs from Europe, Africa, and North America. In 1868, the photographer Augusto Riedel took part in an expedition to the interior of Brazil that visited several mining towns. This photograph, taken by Riedel, shows a mine on the ...
Contributed by
National Library of Brazil
Porkknocker Ready for his Journey Across the Mountains, on his Back is a Warishi
This photograph shows a man on the savannahs of Guyana, carrying his equipment and belongings in a warashi (a knapsack-like basket) on his back. He appears to be prepared for a trek into the interior of Guyana, in search of gold and diamonds. A porkknocker is a Guyanese prospector and miner who extracts and processes gold and diamonds using simple methods. These rugged individualists have been responsible for some of the great discoveries of gold and diamonds in Guyana's interior. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus ...
Contributed by
Columbus Memorial Library, Organization of American States
Searching for Diamonds
This photograph shows three porkknockers in the interior of Guyana. A porkknocker is a Guyanese prospector and miner who extracts and processes gold and diamonds using simple methods. These rugged individualists have been responsible for some of the great discoveries of gold and diamonds in Guyana's interior. There are many stories of porkknockers who struck it rich, but then spent their fortunes in ways both tragic and comic. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45 ...
Contributed by
Columbus Memorial Library, Organization of American States
Nitrate Plant, Chile
This photograph is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and film negatives. The photograph appeared in Carpenter ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Mining Nitrate, Chile
This photograph of sodium nitrate mining in Chile in the first part of the 20th century is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16 ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
A Mill Worker Watches Over the Loading of Powder Fine Phosphate
Major phosphate deposits were first discovered in Florida in Alachua County in the early 1880s. By the turn of the century, phosphate mining was a major industry as phosphate seams were identified in central and southwestern Florida, and mining became an essential economic engine for cities such as Dunnellon, Newberry, and Mulberry. From hand mining with wheelbarrows and picks, to large-scale mechanized mining employing hydraulic pumps and draglines, the industry changed dramatically in the course of the 20th century. Phosphate rock must be separated from the mud and other materials ...
Contributed by
State Library and Archives of Florida
Quarry near Kannesemga (i.e., Kiappeselga) Station
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. This photograph shows a railroad siding extending to a quarry used to obtain sand for the track bed. Building in this marshy, uneven area required enormous amounts of ballast. The caption states the location as Kannesemga (corrected to Kiappeselga, 67 kilometers north of Kondopoga), but recent research suggests that the ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Quarry near Segezh Station
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. This photograph shows a railroad spur in a sand quarry probably located between Makselskaia and Segezha (to the north of Medvezhia Gora in Karelia). Construction of the railroad through this marshy, uneven territory required enormous amounts of ballast. On the track are several flatbed cars filled with sand. The low ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Kirosskii Quarry
The Murmansk Railroad was built by the Russian government during World War I to connect Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) to the ice-free port of Romanov-on-Murman (now Murmansk). Construction lasted from 1914 to the spring of 1917 when the line was completed. The caption in the photographer’s album of contact prints identifies this view as Kirosskii Quarry. The album captions are often inaccurate, but this may have been taken in Kirasozero (Kiras Lake) to the west of Segezha and Maiguba. Construction of the railroad through this marshy territory required enormous amounts ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Side View of Mine Works near the Satkinskii Plant
Shown here are excavation terraces at the Bakal iron mines, one of the world’s richest sources of ore. They are located on the west slope of Mount Irkustan, part of the southwestern Urals in what is now Cheliabinsk Oblast. In 1910, when this photograph was taken, the Bakal mines—which included the Tiazhelye (Heavy) Mines shown here—belonged to the Satkinskii Factory some 30 kilometers to the northeast in the town of Satka (on the other side of the near hills in this view). In the background are log ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Cable Railway from the Tiazhelyi Mine
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Probing Gallery with a Pile of Ironstone in Front of It
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Uncut Diamonds Gathered by Five Different Mines in Two Days, Kimberley, South Africa
This photograph is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855-1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890-1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and film negatives. F.H. Hancox, a South African photographer ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Colliery, Rhodesia
This photograph of a coal-mining operation in Rhodesia (present-day Zimbabwe) is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Washing Brown Iron Ore at the Shilovskii Mine Seven Versts from the Village of Makarovo
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Brown Iron Ore Excavated and Piled at the Same Mine
Originating in the southern Urals, the Chusovaya River flows some 590 kilometers to the northwest and empties into the Kama River near the city of Perm. The rocky, forested terrain along the Chusovaya is rich in minerals. Shown here is part of the laborious process for obtaining brown iron ore at the Shilov Mine, located seven kilometers from the village of Makareva on the Chusovaya in the vicinity of Ekaterinburg. The excavation site is in the foreground, and the rich iron-bearing rocks are piled in the center among pine and ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Gold Washing in the Río Guadalupe, Province of Medellín
This watercolor shows women panning for gold in the Guadalupe River, north of the city of Medellín, province of Medellín (present-day Antioquia Department), Colombia. The extraction of gold was one of the main economic activities in this area. The illustration is by Henry Price (1819–63), a British painter and musician who was one of the draftsmen of the Comisión Corográfica (Chorographic Commission), a body tasked with studying the geography, natural resources, natural history, regional culture, and agriculture of the Republic of New Granada (present-day Colombia and Panama). Price was ...
Contributed by
National Library of Colombia
A Gold-Washing Technique, Province of Barbacoas
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows people panning for gold along a riverbank in what was then Barbacoas Province, in the far southwest of Colombia near the border with Ecuador. Behind them, two men are fishing. In 1853, when the picture was painted, Barbacoas Province stretched from the Pacific lowlands up to the mountains of the Cordillera Occidental. It was the center of an extensive gold- and platinum-mining industry that flourished from the mid-17th century. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity ...
Contributed by
National Library of Colombia
Lorraine and Saar Minefields
In preparation for the peace conference that was expected to follow World War I, in the spring of 1917 the British Foreign Office established a special section responsible for preparing background information for use by British delegates to the conference. Lorraine and Saar Minefields is Number 31 in a series of more than 160 studies produced by the section, most of which were published after the conclusion of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. The study focuses on coal and iron-ore production in the 2,500-square mile (6,475-square kilometer) region ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
S.F. Jacoby and Company. Importers and Dealers in Foreign and Domestic Marble in All Their Varieties. J.K. and M. Freedley Dealers in American Marble
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement contains a montage of three titled views showing the sites involved in the operations of the Jacoby and Freedley companies. The scenes are separated and surrounded by an ornate border, comprised of patriotic imagery on top, including an eagle clutching the American flag and shield near a bust of George Washington and the state seals of Pennsylvania and Massachusetts. Filigree, foliage, and tassels decorate the ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia