12 results
Commentary on the First Part of Avicenna’s “Canon of Medicine” and “Chapter on the Limbs” by Giano Matteo Durastante
This volume contains a Latin commentary on the first part of Avicenna’s Al-Qānūn fī al-ṭibb (The canon of medicine) by the Italian physician and philosopher Giovanni Battista da Mónte (known as Montano, 1498–1551), published in Venice in 1557. Montano was born in Verona. After first working in Brescia, he taught medicine at the University of Padua. He translated various works from Greek into Latin and wrote numerous commentaries on treatises by Hippocrates, Galen, and Avicenna, most of which were published posthumously by his followers. He ...
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Qatar National Library
A Hundred Verses on Manifestations of Cold Damage Disorders
In one of the prefaces to his works, the author Xu Shuwei (1079–1154) describes a certain Hua Tuo, a scholar born around 140 AD during the Han dynasty, who, after seeing many people die in epidemics, famines, and wars, chose to abandon scholarship to pursue a medical career. Referring to himself, Xu Shuwei writes, “every time I think of the lack of good physicians and of patients who are resigned to die, how could someone with capability sit by and not help? Therefore I have buried my fame as ...
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National Central Library
New Edition with Supplemental Annotations of The Inner Canon of the Yellow Emperor. Su wen
The ancient medical text Huangdi nei jing (The inner canon of the Yellow Emperor) was already listed in Yi wen zhi (Treatise on literature) of Han shu (Book of Han), the classical Chinese history completed in 111 AD. It had two texts: Su wen (Basic questions) and Ling shu (Spiritual pivot), each in nine juan. Su wen deals with the theoretical foundation of Chinese medicine and its diagnostic methods, while Ling shu discusses acupuncture therapy in great detail. The title Huangdi nei jing often refers only to the more ...
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National Central Library
Traditional Chinese Medical Methods of Treatment of Smallpox and Measles
This work was compiled by Wan Quan (1495–1580), a famed physician of the Ming dynasty. A native of Luotian, Hubei Province, Wan Quan came from a family of physicians. His works, such as one on Su wen (Basic questions), followed the schools of Zhang Zhongjing, Liu Hejian, Li Dongyuan and Zhu Danxi, the four great physicians of the Jin and Yuan dynasties (1115–1368). At least ten works are known to have been written by Wan Quan. His subjects cover a wide range of topics, including fevers, maintenance of ...
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National Central Library
Abridged Version of “De arte phisicali de cirurgia”, “Fistula in ano”, Including an Obstetrical Treatise
Manuscript X 188 in the National Library of Sweden dates to around 1425–35 and contains two works by John Arderne (active 1307–70), an abridged version of De arte phisicali et de cirurgia (Of the physical arts and surgery) and Fistula in ano. Also included is a tract on obstetrics by another author, Muscio. De arte phisicali et de cirurgia is a textbook on medicine and surgery; Fistula in ano deals with rectal disorders. The manuscript is written in two long columns on a parchment roll that is 542 ...
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National Library of Sweden
Tables of the Body for Treatment
The well-known author of this manuscript, Abū Alī Yahyā ibn Īsā ibn Jazla (died, Sha’bān AH 493 [May–June 1100]), also wrote several other books, such as Al-minhāj fi al-tibb (The guide in medicine), and Taqwīm al-abdān (Curing the bodies). He was born to Christian parents but converted to Islam around 1074 (AH 466) and later wrote a rebuttal of Christianity. He had studied medicine with Saīd ibn Hibat-Allāh. In Taqwīm al-abdān fī tadbīr al-insān (Tables of the body for treatment), Abū Alī Yahyā provides information in tabular form ...
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National Library and Archives of Egypt
The Little Treatise on the Medical Treatment of the Back and of Hemorrhoids
The present manuscript preserves a copy of a brief medical treatise by the erudite polymath Aḥmad ibn ʻAbd al-Munʻim al-Damanhūrī (1690–1778). The name of al-Damanhūrī more traditionally is connected with his activity as a professor at Al-Azhar University in Cairo and with his numerous treatises on politics, Islamic law, logic, and rhetoric. One of his works, a fatwa in which he criticized the building of new churches and the reopening of old ones in 18th-century Cairo, recently has been published in English translation. The treatise in this manuscript shows ...
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Library of Congress
Save the Serbians from Cholera
This World War I poster, issued in New York in 1918 to raise funds for the Franco-Serbian Field Hospital of America, shows the figure of Death reaching down from storm clouds to menace a devastated populace. Of all the belligerents on either side in the war, Serbia suffered the highest number of military deaths as a share of the population: 22.7 percent killed of all males between the ages of 15 and 47, and 5.7 percent killed of the total population. War-related casualties were compounded by the effects ...
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Library of Congress
Curing Diseases and Defects Both Apparent and Hidden
Timbuktu, founded around 1100 as a commercial center for trade across the Sahara Desert, was also an important seat of Islamic learning from the 14th century onward. The libraries of Timbuktu contain many important manuscripts, in different styles of Arabic scripts, which were written and copied by Timbuktu’s scribes and scholars. These works constitute the city’s most famous and long-lasting contribution to Islamic and world civilization. This compilation of cures (date unknown) instructs the reader about methods of diagnosing and medicating the sick. The author explains the use ...
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Mamma Haidara Commemorative Library
Treatise on Diagnoses and Treatments of Zang and Fu Organs with Illustrations of Human Body
This printed edition, in eight juan, with two juan of supplements, in six volumes, was published in the 34th year of the Wanli reign (1608). The work has some characteristic features of Ming printing, its woodblocks being cut with extreme care and precision, the typeface mostly cut in square shape, and the binding stitch-bound. The author of the original work is unknown. The preface dated 1606 by Qian Lei, a Ming dynasty physician from Siming (present-day Ningbo Shi, Zhejiang Province), states that he had acquired a book entitled Zang ...
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Library of Congress
New Methods in Medicine
Symphorien Champier (circa 1472–circa 1535) was a French physician and a pioneer in the fields of medical history and medical bibliography. He was born in Saint-Symphorien and studied medicine at Montpellier. After serving as personal physician to the duke of Lorraine, he settled in Lyon, where he practiced medicine and founded L’Ecole des médicins de Lyon (The Medical School of Lyon). Lyon was a major publishing center for medical books in 16th-century Europe, and Champier produced a number of works on medicine. Practica nova in medicina (New methods ...
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Qatar National Library
Tables of the Body for Treatment
Between 1050 and 1150, a new medical literary form was espoused by several physicians living in different cities in the Arab world—the tabular form. One of these physicians was Yaḥyá ibn ʻĪsá ibn Jazlah, a Christian born in Baghdad, who converted to Islam in 1074 and died in Baghdad in 1100. In this work, Taqwīm al-abdān fī tadbīr al-insān (Tables of the body for treatment), Ibn Jazlah divides diseases into 44 categories. Each category comprises eight conditions, and each condition is discussed in 12 columns, with the following titles ...
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Yale University Library