50 results in English
Central Asian Funerary Customs. A Group of Jewish Women at a Funeral
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Central Asian Funerary Customs. Indian Funerals. Three Men Laying Wood on Top of a Body Lying on a Wooden Bier
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Central Asian Funerary Customs. Preparation for a Kyrgyz Burial
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Central Asian Funerary Customs. Tajik Funerals. A Procession
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Kyrgyz Wedding Rites. An Elderly Woman Dies
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Syr Darya Oblast. Kyrgyz Cemetery
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Cutting Stone at the Sacred Phabongka Cemetery
This photograph shows a slab of stone where the corpses of the dead are cut to pieces at the sacred P'abon-k'a-ritod cemetery (also seen as Pabon-ka-ritod or Phabongka in other sources). It is from a collection of 50 photographs of central Tibet acquired in 1904 from the Imperial Russian Geographical Society in Saint Petersburg by the American Geographical Society. The photographer, G.Ts. Tsybikov, notes that the hermitage of P'abon-k'a-ritod is located about two English miles to the northwest of Sera. “The high priests, indeed, are ...
New Cemetery
The Thereza Christina Maria collection is composed of 21,742 photos assembled by Emperor Pedro II (1825-91) throughout his life and donated by him to the National Library of Brazil. The collection covers a wide variety of subjects. It documents the achievements of Brazil and Brazilians in the 19th century and also includes many photographs of Europe, Africa, and North America. This photograph depicts the New Cemetery of Petrópolis. This photograph is one of a series taken in the late 1860s by Pedro Hees, considered by many to be the ...
Unidentified Girl in Mourning Dress Holding Framed Photograph of Her Father
This photograph shows a girl holding a framed image of her father. Judging from her necklace, mourning ribbons, and dress, it is likely that her father was killed in the war. The man in the portrait is recognizable as a Union cavalryman with a sword, wearing a Hardee hat (the regulation hat for enlisted men). The photograph is from the Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs at the Library of Congress. The collection includes more than 1,000 special portrait photographs, called ambrotypes and tintypes, representing both Union and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Ruins of Muslim Graves in the Town of Hami, in the Gobi. Xinjiang, China, 1875
In 1874-75, the Russian government sent a research and trading mission to China to seek out new overland routes to the Chinese market, report on prospects for increased commerce and locations for consulates and factories, and gather information about the Dungan Revolt then raging in parts of western China. Led by Lieutenant Colonel Iulian A. Sosnovskii of the army General Staff, the nine-man mission included a topographer, Captain Matusovskii; a scientific officer, Dr. Pavel Iakovlevich Piasetskii; Chinese and Russian interpreters; three non-commissioned Cossack soldiers; and the mission photographer, Adolf Erazmovich ...
The Russian Cemetery Built in 18th Century. Beijing, 1874
In 1874-75, the Russian government sent a research and trading mission to China to seek out new overland routes to the Chinese market, report on prospects for increased commerce and locations for consulates and factories, and gather information about the Dungan Revolt then raging in parts of western China. Led by Lieutenant Colonel Iulian A. Sosnovskii of the army General Staff, the nine-man mission included a topographer, Captain Matusovskii; a scientific officer, Dr. Pavel Iakovlevich Piasetskii; Chinese and Russian interpreters; three non-commissioned Cossack soldiers; and the mission photographer, Adolf Erazmovich ...
Antiquities of Samarkand. Tomb of the Saint Kusam-ibn-Abbas (Shah-i Zindah) and Adjacent Mausoleums. Grave Where the Sepulcher of the Saint Stands. Grave of the Saint Kusam-ibn-Abbas (Shah-i Zindah) Who Died in 57 A.H
This sketch of the interior of the Kusam-ibn-Abbas Mausoleum in the northern cluster of shrines at the Shah-i Zindah necropolis in Samarkand is from the archeological part of Turkestan Album. The six-volume photographic survey was produced in 1871-72, under the patronage of General Konstantin P. von Kaufman, the first governor-general (1867-82) of Turkestan, as the Russian Empire's Central Asian territories were called. The album devotes special attention to Samarkand’s Islamic architecture, such as 14th- and 15th-century monuments from the reign of Timur (Tamerlane) and his successors. The Shah-i ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Antiquities of Samarkand. Kurgan in the Vicinity of Samarkand. Location of Kafir Muri
This photograph of the ruins of a fortress mound at Kafir Muri, near Samarkand (Uzbekistan), is from the archeological part of Turkestan Album. The six-volume photographic survey was produced in 1871-72 under the patronage of General Konstantin P. von Kaufman, the first governor-general (1867-82) of Turkestan, as the Russian Empire’s Central Asian territories were called. The album devotes special attention to Samarkand’s architectural heritage. There are a number of such fortresses in the vicinity of Samarkand, presumably built by Sogdian kings before the Arab conquest at the turn ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Antiquities of Samarkand. Kurgan in the Vicinity of Samarkand. Location of Khan Charbag
This photograph of the ruins of a fortress at Khan Charbag, near Samarkand (Uzbekistan), is from the archeological part of Turkestan Album. The six-volume photographic survey was produced in 1871-72 under the patronage of General Konstantin P. von Kaufman, the first governor-general (1867-82) of Turkestan, as the Russian Empire’s Central Asian territories were called. The album devotes special attention to Samarkand’s architectural heritage. The Samarkand region has a number of fortress ruins such as the one shown here. The fortifications were typically built by Sogdian kings, before the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Antiquities of Samarkand. Kurgan in the Vicinity of Samarkand. Location of Pai Fasad. General View of the Tumulus from Its Base
This photograph of fortress ruins at Pai Fasad, near Samarkand (Uzbekistan), is from the archeological part of Turkestan Album. The six-volume photographic survey was produced in 1871-72 under the patronage of General Konstantin P. von Kaufman, the first governor-general (1867-82) of Turkestan, as the Russian Empire’s Central Asian territories were called. The album devotes special attention to Samarkand’s architectural heritage. The mound shown here is possibly a remnant of one of the fortresses built by Sogdian kings before the Arab conquest at the turn of the 8th century ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Antiquities of Samarkand. Kurgan in the Vicinity of Samarkand. Location of Pai Fasad. View of the Kurgan from Its Summit
This photograph of the remains of an earthen mound at Pai Fasad, near Samarkand (Uzbekistan), is from the archeological part of Turkestan Album. The six-volume photographic survey was produced in 1871-72 under the patronage of General Konstantin P. von Kaufman, the first governor-general (1867-82) of Turkestan, as the Russian Empire’s Central Asian territories were called. The album devotes special attention to Samarkand’s architectural heritage. The mound shown here is possibly a remnant of one of the fortresses built by Sogdian kings before the Arab conquest at the turn ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Antiquities of Samarkand. Kurgan in the Vicinity of Samarkand. Location of Kafir Kala
This photograph of the ruins of the Kafir Kala fortress, to the south of Samarkand (Uzbekistan), is from the archeological part of Turkestan Album. The six-volume photographic survey was produced in 1871-72 under the patronage of General Konstantin P. von Kaufman, the first governor-general (1867-82) of Turkestan, as the Russian Empire’s Central Asian territories were called. The album devotes special attention to Samarkand’s architectural heritage. There are a number of locations in Central Asia with the name “Kafir-Kala,” meaning “infidels’ fortress,” presumably in reference to fortresses built before ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Antiquities of Samarkand. Kurgan in the Vicinity of Samarkand. Ruins of the Citadel of Afrasiab
This photograph of the ancient settlement of Afrosiab, on the northern outskirts of Samarkand (Uzbekistan), is from the archeological part of Turkestan Album. The six-volume photographic survey was produced in 1871-72 under the patronage of General Konstantin P. von Kaufman, the first governor-general (1867-82) of Turkestan, as the Russian Empire’s Central Asian territories were called. The album devotes special attention to Samarkand’s architectural heritage. In 1874 -- a few years after this photograph -- the first excavations began on the Afrasiab site. Subsequent major excavations have revealed a wealth of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Antiquities of Samarkand. Mausoleum of Sheikh Burkhaneddin Kilich. Rukhabad. General View
This photograph of the Rukhabad mausoleum in Samarkand (Uzbekistan) is from the archeological part of Turkestan Album. The six-volume photographic survey was produced in 1871-72 under the patronage of General Konstantin P. von Kaufman, the first governor-general (1867-82) of Turkestan, as the Russian Empire’s Central Asian territories were called. The album devotes special attention to Samarkand’s Islamic architectural heritage. In the center of this view is the mausoleum known as Rukhabad (“dwelling of the soul”), a centralized domed structure probably built in the 1380s for the sage and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Antiquities of Samarkand. Mosque of Khodzha Akhrar. General View of the Crypt of Saint Khodzha Akhrar and the Mosque
This photograph of the Khodzha Akhrar shrine in Samarkand (Uzbekistan) is from the archeological part of Turkestan Album. The six-volume photographic survey was produced in 1871-72 under the patronage of General Konstantin P. von Kaufman, the first governor-general (1867-82) of Turkestan, as the Russian Empire’s Central Asian territories were called. The album devotes special attention to Samarkand’s Islamic architectural heritage. The shrine contains several structures dedicated to the memory of the renowned 15th-century mystic Khodzha Akhrar (1403-89). The main components are a winter and a summer mosque. The ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Antiquities of Samarkand. Mosque of Khodzha Abdu-Berun. Tomb (sagana) of the Saint
This photograph of the grave at the Khodzha Abdu-Berun memorial complex in Samarkand (Uzbekistan) is from the archeological part of Turkestan Album. The six-volume photographic survey was produced in 1871-72 under the patronage of General Konstantin P. von Kaufman, the first governor-general (1867-82) of Turkestan, as the Russian Empire’s Central Asian territories were called. The album devotes special attention to Samarkand’s Islamic architectural heritage. The Khodzha Abdu-Berun ensemble was dedicated to a revered 9th-century Arab judge of the Abdi clan, with the word berun (outer) added to specify ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Antiquities of Samarkand. Mosque of Khodzha Akhrar. Family Crypt (sagana) of Khodzha Akhrar
This photograph of the Khodzha Akhrar shrine in Samarkand (Uzbekistan) is from the archeological part of Turkestan Album. The six-volume photographic survey was produced in 1871-72 under the patronage of General Konstantin P. von Kaufman, the first governor-general (1867-82) of Turkestan, as the Russian Empire’s Central Asian territories were called. The album devotes special attention to Samarkand’s Islamic architectural heritage. This shrine is dedicated to the memory of the renowned 15th-century mystic Khodzha Akhrar (1403-89), an ascetic and adherent of Sufism, who wielded great spiritual influence in Central ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Sart Cemetery near Syr-Darya. Golodnaia Steppe
Seen here is a Sart cemetery in the steppe near the Syr-Darya River (just visible in the right background). “Sart” was a term with various ethnic meanings in the late 19th century, and was often used to refer to inhabitants of this area before the coming of Uzbek tribes in the 16th century. The burial mounds were a widespread practice not only in the country but also in cities such as Samarkand. On the right the burial place of a venerated sage is marked by a mazar (ancient shrine) covered ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Site Where the Relics of Grand Duchesses Evfrosiniia and Evdokiia Are Interred. Goritskii Monastery, Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Exterior Cover for the Sepulchre of the Venerable Kirill. A Donation from the Nun Tsarina Maria Nagikh Kirillo-Belozerskii Monastery, Kirillov, Russian Empire
A major component of the Volga-Baltic Waterway (formerly called the Mariinsk Canal System), linking Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin, is the Sheksna River, which drains the southeastern part of White Lake (Beloe ozero). One of the most important settlements near the Sheksna is Kirillov, founded in 1397 by the monk Kirill (Cyril) as part of his Dormition Monastery, subsequently named the Kirillo-Belozersky Monastery. Seen in this 1909 photograph is a gold embroidered silk memorial pokrov (or covering) for the sepulcher containing the relics of Saint Kirill in the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Cemetery at Assumption Hermitage. Russian Empire
A major component of the Volga-Baltic Waterway (formerly called the Mariinsk Canal System), linking Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin, is the Sheksna River, which drains the southeastern part of White Lake (Beloe ozero). The original length of the Sheksna was 395 kilometers, from White Lake to the Sheksna’s confluence with the Volga at the town of Rybinsk. Resevoirs created in the mid-20th century submerged much of the land along the river. A lost landmark was the John the Baptist convent at the village of Leushino, located on ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Grave of Tuchkova and Her Son in a Church She Built in Spaso-Borodinskii Monastery. Borodino
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Tomb on the Same Side in the Passage of the Dead. Samarkand
The Shah-i Zindah (Persian for “living king”) necropolis is located at the outskirts of Samarkand. Situated on an ancient burial ground, it is revered as a memorial to Kusam-ibn-Abbas, a cousin of the Prophet Muhammad. Shown here is an unidentified mausoleum located to the north of the mausoleum built by Usto Ali Nesefi. Despite severe losses to the facade, surviving fragments reveal a decorative structure with faience panels and Arabic script, as well as majolica tiles in geometric patterns. These forms are framed by interlocking ceramic bands of intricate design ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Grave in the Shah-i Zindah Mosque. Samarkand
The Shah-i Zindah (Persian for “living king”) necropolis is located at the outskirts of Samarkand. Situated on an ancient burial ground, it is revered as a memorial to Kusam-ibn-Abbas, a cousin of the Prophet Muhammad. Shown here are tombs and burial mounds on the hillside of the complex. Of special interest is the tomb in the foreground, enclosed with a wooden railing. The front of the tomb is marked by a traditional burial pole, with a colorful banner and horsetail ornament indicating the noble status of the deceased. The Shah-i ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Tomb on the Mountain in Shah-i Zindah. Samarkand
Located on an ancient burial ground on the outskirts of Samarkand, Shah-i Zindah (Persian for “living king”) is revered as a memorial to Kusam-ibn-Abbas, a cousin of the Prophet Muhammad. The patron of this mausoleum, built around 1380, is unknown; therefore, it is referred to by the name of its master builder, Usto Ali Nesefi.  Despite severe losses to the main facade, surviving ornamentation reveals one of the most elaborate decorative programs in the entire necropolis. The ceramic work includes polychrome majolica tiles in geometric patterns, faience panels, and Arabic ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Pogost Country Church with Cemetery in a Forest One Verst from Zubtsov along the Volga River
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Grave of the Gagarin Princes, Village of Suchki 60 Versts from Tver
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Monument to Ermak in Tobolsk
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
Adobe Buildings and Burial Mounds in Desert Area
This view shows the Tekin Cemetery near the town of Bayramaly (present-day Turkmenistan).The earthen mounds, which often were reinforced with brick, are burial plots typical of Central Asia. Some of the mounds still have poles that were used as grave markers. Visible on the left are adobe walls that enclose special burial grounds. Bayramaly, situated in Mary Province on the railroad from Ashgabat to Tashkent, is known as a dry spa with a favorable climate. Nearby are the remains of the ancient city of Merv. The image is by ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Tomb on the Mountain in Shakh-I Zindeh. Samarkand
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Custom of Aztec Burial
The Tovar Codex, attributed to the 16th-century Mexican Jesuit Juan de Tovar, contains detailed information about the rites and ceremonies of the Aztecs (also known as Mexica). The codex is illustrated with 51 full-page paintings in watercolor. Strongly influenced by pre-contact pictographic manuscripts, the paintings are of exceptional artistic quality. The manuscript is divided into three sections. The first section is a history of the travels of the Aztecs prior to the arrival of the Spanish. The second section, an illustrated history of the Aztecs, forms the main body of ...
Contributed by John Carter Brown Library
The Funeral Rites of Auitzotl
The Tovar Codex, attributed to the 16th-century Mexican Jesuit Juan de Tovar, contains detailed information about the rites and ceremonies of the Aztecs (also known as Mexica). The codex is illustrated with 51 full-page paintings in watercolor. Strongly influenced by pre-contact pictographic manuscripts, the paintings are of exceptional artistic quality. The manuscript is divided into three sections. The first section is a history of the travels of the Aztecs prior to the arrival of the Spanish. The second section, an illustrated history of the Aztecs, forms the main body of ...
Contributed by John Carter Brown Library
The Cemetery, with Chapel, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of a cemetery in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers described several cemeteries in the city. The Cimetière Musulman de Belcourt was “the finest Mohammedan burial-ground in Algiers, containing a number of handsome monuments and the picturesque Kubba [tomb] of Sidi Abderrahman Bu-Kobrin (died 1793), a famous Algerian saint, a native of Great Kabylia.” On the sides of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Cemetery, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of a cemetery in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers described several cemeteries in the city. The Cimetière Musulman de Belcourt was “the finest Mohammedan burial-ground in Algiers, containing a number of handsome monuments and the picturesque Kubba [tomb] of Sidi Abderrahman Bu-Kobrin (died 1793), a famous Algerian saint, a native of Great Kabylia.” On the sides of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Part of the Cemetery, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of a cemetery in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers described several cemeteries in the city. The Cimetière Musulman de Belcourt was “the finest Mohammedan burial-ground in Algiers, containing a number of handsome monuments and the picturesque Kubba [tomb] of Sidi Abderrahman Bu-Kobrin (d. 1793), a famous Algerian saint, a native of Great Kabylia.” On the sides of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Marabut near Biskra, Algeria
This photochrome print of the tomb of a marabout (a Muslim holy man or mystic) in Biskra, Algeria, is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Located on the northern edge of the Sahara, the town goes back at least to the time of the Romans, who valued the health-giving properties of the sulfur springs in the area and built a small fortification, which they called Vescera, close to the nearby oases. The French garrisoned the town in 1844 ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Sacred Wood, Blidah, Algeria
This photochrome print from Blida, Algeria, is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). According to the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers, the town was “one of the pleasantest provincial towns in Algeria, with a strong garrison … charmingly situated at the N. base of the Tell Atlas, on the right bank of the Oued el-Kebir.” Blida was a Roman military site, but the town “is said to have been founded ...
Contributed by Library of Congress