16 results in English
General History of the Things of New Spain by Fray Bernardino de Sahagún: The Florentine Codex. Book VIII: Kings and Lords
Historia general de las cosas de nueva España (General history of the things of New Spain) is an encyclopedic work about the people and culture of central Mexico compiled by Fray Bernardino de Sahagún (1499–1590), a Franciscan missionary who arrived in Mexico in 1529, eight years after completion of the Spanish conquest by Hernan Cortés. Commonly referred to as the Florentine Codex, the manuscript consists of 12 books devoted to different topics. Book VIII is concerned with kings and nobles, forms of government, elections of rulers, and the customs ...
General History of the Things of New Spain by Fray Bernardino de Sahagún: The Florentine Codex. Book X: The People, Their Virtues and Vices, and Other Nations
Historia general de las cosas de nueva España (General history of the things of New Spain) is an encyclopedic work about the people and culture of central Mexico compiled by Fray Bernardino de Sahagún (1499–1590), a Franciscan missionary who arrived in Mexico in 1529, eight years after completion of the Spanish conquest by Hernan Cortés. Commonly referred to as the Florentine Codex, the manuscript consists of 12 books devoted to different topics. Book X is about Aztec society and covers such subjects as the virtues and vices of the ...
Customs of Central Asians. Two Men Greeting Each Other
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Customs of Central Asians. Two Men Greeting Each Other
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Snippets on the Three Calendars
Presented here is a manuscript copy of a Song edition of a collection of calendars, issued in the late-Ming dynasty by Jiguge, the largest private publishing house established in the late Ming. The work has three parts. Part one contains supplements on the auspicious days in each of the 12 months for the following activities: weddings, marriage proposals, gift giving, travel, boarding a ship, taking office, starting construction, scaffolding a house, digging the ground, moving into a house, burial, wearing and taking off a robe, filing a suit, opening a ...
Contributed by National Central Library
Funafuti; Or Three Months on a Coral Island: An Unscientific Account of a Scientific Expedition
Funafuti is a coral atoll that is part of Tuvalu, a sovereign nation located in the west-central Pacific Ocean, midway between Hawaii and Australia. This book is an account of a scientific expedition in 1897 to Funafuti, which at the time was part of the British protectorate of the Gilbert and Ellice Islands. The author, Janet William Edgeworth David, the wife of Professor T. W. E. David of Sydney University in Australia, accompanied her husband on the expedition. The object of the expedition was to take deep borings of coral ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
History of Corea, Ancient and Modern; with Description of Manners and Customs, Language and Geography
The Reverend John Ross was a Presbyterian minister who, in 1872, left his native Scotland to become a missionary in China. He opened a school for boys in 1873 and, having mastered Chinese, in 1877 published Mandarin Primer: Being Easy Lessons for Beginners, designed to help English speakers learn Chinese. After working for a time in Xin Zhuang, Liaoning Province, he moved to the Manchurian city of Mukden (present-day Shenyang), near the Chinese-Korean border. At the time, Korea followed a policy of isolation and did not permit missionaries on its ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Peasants Dancing, Bosnia, Austro-Hungary
This photochrome print is part of “Views of the Austro-Hungarian Empire,” a selection of photographs of late-19th-century tourist sites in Eastern and Central Europe (formerly the Austro-Hungarian Empire) in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. Bosnia was conquered by the Ottoman Turks in 1463. Following the Russo-Turkish War of 1877–78, the Congress of Berlin (1878) gave Austria-Hungary a mandate to occupy and govern Bosnia and Herzegovina, which remained under nominal Ottoman sovereignty until 1908. Shown here are peasants in traditional dress, performing a dance (identified on the print ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Scenes of the Everglades
Businessman and adventurer Homer Augustus Brinkley produced this film in 1928 after living for several months among the Seminole Indians in the Everglades. He later used the film in a traveling show that featured a live, caged bear and himself dressed as a Seminole. Photographed by William B. Feeland, the film contains some of the earliest moving footage of the Seminole. Beginning with panoramic shots of vegetation, waterways, and abandoned structures, the film includes footage of wildlife, such as an owl, raccoons, water moccasins, alligators, deer, a wild turkey, and ...
Bulgarian Folk Songs
Bulgarian Folk Songs is the most important National Revival-era compilation of Bulgarian folk material. Gathered and edited by Dimitrii Miladinov (1810–62) and his brother Konstantin (1830–62), the work contains folk songs, riddles, games, and proverbs from both the western and eastern parts of Bulgaria. The Miladinovs were born in Struga (in present-day Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia) in what was then the Ottoman Empire. With its 665 songs, Bulgarian Folk Songs had a strong influence on Bulgarian literature and culture as well as on the development of Slavic ...
Bulgarian Folk Calendar for Leap Year 1868
Bulgarian Folk Calendar for Leap Year 1868 is one of a number of popular folk calendars produced by En’o Kŭrpachev (1833–1916), a publisher in Constantinople (present-day Istanbul), during the National Revival era in Bulgaria. The first published Bulgarian calendar appeared in 1818. Over 100 of them were published during the National Revival era alone. The wave of popularity for Bulgarian calendars began in the 1840s and continued long past the end of the Revival period. Calendars were a popular genre of reading material in the 19th century, and ...
Record of Songs and Dances Performed by Professional Female Entertainers
Gyobanggayo is a collection of 19th-century songs and dances by the gisaeng (the Korean equivalent of geisha). Gyobang were the facilities that trained and controlled gisaeng, who belonged to the provincial government office during the Joseon Dynasty, and gayo meant songs. The book includes not only ariettas, lyrics, poems, and folksongs (all collected using Hangul, the Korean alphabet) but also colored manuscripts of dances with detailed movements for the gisaeng. It has a distinct historical value by providing insight into the cultural and social situations of the provinces at that ...
Contributed by National Library of Korea
Nursery Tales, Traditions, and Histories of the Zulus in their Own Words: With a Translation into English, and Notes by the Rev. Canon Callaway. Volume 1
Nursery Tales, Traditions, and Histories of the Zulus in Their Own Words is a compilation of Zulu literature gathered by the Reverend Henry Callaway (1817–90) in the Natal region of South Africa in the late 1850s and 1860s. Callaway left the United Kingdom in 1856 to become a Church of England missionary. In 1858 he settled near the Umkomanzi River in Natal and began to study the Zulu language, religious beliefs, and oral traditions. As Callaway mastered the language, he wrote down tales dictated to him by native storytellers ...
Ceremonial Etiquette for the Newly Appointed Officials
Xin guan dao ren yi zhu (Ceremonial etiquette for the newly appointed officials) is a Ming edition of two juan, in two volumes, on ceremonies and rules for new officials. The author is unknown, but inside the book is an inscription indicating that it was a reprint of an original edition printed by imperial order. The preface, dated 1565, was written by Guo Banshan and states that the original work was owned by Liu Zizhen, who reprinted the book on the advice of one of his friends. Many similar works ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Twelve Months by Toyokuni: First Dancing Practice of the New Year
This nishiki-e (Japanese multicolored woodblock print) is one of a 12-part series depicting annual events and the changing of people’s lives with the seasons, from January to December, modeled on beautiful women in Edo (present-day Tokyo) in the early 19th century. This picture, a happy and brilliant scene that symbolizes the New Year, represents January and is titled in the top left-hand corner. It shows two young women having their first dancing practice of the New Year to a shamisen accompaniment. The dance is Harukoma, which expresses the wish ...
Contributed by National Diet Library
The Lango: A Nilotic Tribe of Uganda
This 1923 study of the Lango people of north-central Uganda narrates the origins and history of the group, which had a form of government based on minor clan chiefs, rather than a king or superior chief, before the arrival of the British rule. Jack Herbert Driberg (1888–1946) was a British official in the service of the Uganda Protectorate in 1912–21 and lived and worked among the Lango, for whom he had both sympathy and admiration. He describes the ethnology of the Lango nation; their environment, including the fauna ...