11 results
Marittima Italiana: Bombay Line
Marittima Italiana was an Italian shipping company, established in 1936 as an offshoot of the long-established firm of Lloyd-Triestino, which in the late 1930s operated shipping lines between Italy and east Africa, southern Africa, Asia, and Australia. Shown here is a map of Marittima Italiana’s line from Genoa to Bombay (Mumbai), India. Distances are given for the different sections of the route: from Genoa to Naples, Naples to Port Said, Port Said to Aden, and Aden to Bombay. Inset maps show these five ports and the Suez Canal, with ...
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Library of Congress
Pier in the Town of Hankou, Hubei Province, China, 1874
In 1874-75, the Russian government sent a research and trading mission to China to seek out new overland routes to the Chinese market, report on prospects for increased commerce and locations for consulates and factories, and gather information about the Dungan Revolt then raging in parts of western China. Led by Lieutenant Colonel Iulian A. Sosnovskii of the army General Staff, the nine-man mission included a topographer, Captain Matusovskii; a scientific officer, Dr. Pavel Iakovlevich Piasetskii; Chinese and Russian interpreters; three non-commissioned Cossack soldiers; and the mission photographer, Adolf Erazmovich ...
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National Library of Brazil
Fort Jefferson Lighthouse
This photograph shows Fort Jefferson Lighthouse, one of 30 historic lighthouses in the state of Florida. The origins of the structure go back to 1825, when a 65-foot (20-meter) tower was completed at Bush Key (now known as Garden Key) in the Dry Tortugas and fitted with a light consisting of 23 lamps in 14-inch (35-centimeter) reflectors. Construction of Fort Jefferson began in 1847. The fort covered the entire island and incorporated the lighthouse in its south wall. In 1856 a taller lighthouse was constructed, and in 1858 the Garden ...
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State Library and Archives of Florida
Entrance to Port, Ostend, Belgium
This photochrome print of the port in Ostend is part of “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Belgium” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Located in West Flanders on the coast of the North Sea, Ostend is one of Belgium’s main port cities. Baedeker’s Belgium and Holland including the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg (1905) called Ostend “the second seaport and the most fashionable sea-bathing resort of Belgium.” Visible to the right is the Western Pier, which was built in 1837 to accommodate the city’s ...
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Library of Congress
Cherepovets Harbor. Russian Empire
The Mariinsky Canal system (now known as the Volga-Baltic Waterway) links Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin. When this photograph was taken, in 1909, a primary component of the waterway was the Sheksna River, which drained White Lake at its southeast corner and flowed west to the Volga. The Sheksna and Volga merged near the town of Rybinsk. (The course of the Sheksna is now largely hidden by vast reservoirs.) Cherepovets, the main town on the Sheksna, was first settled in the 14th century at the site where the ...
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Library of Congress
Embankment in the City of Cherepovets. Russian Empire
A major component of the Volga-Baltic Waterway (formerly called the Mariinsk Canal System), linking Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin, is the Sheksna River, which drains the southeastern part of White Lake (Beloe ozero). The original length of the Sheksna was 395 kilometers, from White Lake to the Sheksna’sconfluence with the Volga at the city of Rybinsk. Much of that length is now submerged by two large reservoirs created in the in the mid 20th century as a part of Soviet river navigation and hydroelectric policy. Between the ...
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Library of Congress
Dredging Machine, "Sheksninskaia" No. 1, with Scoops and a Delivery Pipeline. Russian Empire
A major component of the Volga-Baltic Waterway (formerly called the Mariinsk Canal System), linking Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin, is the Sheksna River, which drains the southeastern part of White Lake (Beloe ozero). The original length of the Sheksna was 395 kilometers, from White Lake to the Sheksna’s confluence with the Volga at the town of Rybinsk. At the turn of the 20th century the Ministry of Transportation devoted considerable resources to improving the Sheksna for water transportation. Shown in this 1909 photograph is a self-propelled steam ...
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Library of Congress
Ice Breakers on the Iurezan River. Ust-Katav
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress
Disembarking from a Ship, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of passengers disembarking from a ship in the harbor in Algiers, and being helped into small boats for transfer to shore, is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). After seizing Algiers from the Ottomans in 1830, the French made the city a military and administrative headquarters for their colonial empire in North and West Africa. The city was particularly important for its strategic harbor, located in the Bay of Algiers. The French promoted immigration to ...
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Library of Congress
Passengers Disembarking, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of passengers disembarking from a ship in the harbor in Algiers into a fleet of boats for transfer to shore is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). After seizing Algiers from the Ottomans in 1830, the French made the city a military and administrative headquarters for their colonial empire in North and West Africa. The city was particularly important for its strategic harbor, located in the Bay of Algiers. The French promoted immigration to Algiers ...
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Library of Congress
Steamship "Normannia", Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the steamship Normannia in the harbor in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Constructed in Glasgow, Scotland, in 1890, the Normannia was one of four twin-propeller steamers belonging to the Hamburg-American Line that regularly crossed the Atlantic from Hamburg, Germany, and Southampton, England to New York. The ship displaced 8,374.26 metric tons and was 152.40 meters long and 17.53 meters wide. The Normannia was severely damaged in January ...
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Library of Congress