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44 results
Syr Darya Oblast. Kara Tiube, near Kazalinsk
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
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Library of Congress
Syr Darya Oblast. Crossing via the Syr Darya River
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Syr Darya Oblast. Ferry Crossing the Syr Darya at the City of Chinaz
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Syr Darya Oblast. Ferry on the Arys River
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Oscarshal, Christiania, Norway
According to the 1892 edition of Baedeker’s Norway, Sweden and Denmark, the “château of Oscarshall was erected in the English Gothic style by Nebelong for King Oscar I in 1849-52, and adorned with paintings by eminent Norwegian artists. It was sold to the government by Charles XV, but it is still kept up as a royal residence. It deserves a visit for the sake of its pictures and the view.” This photomechanical print from the Detroit Publishing Company shows how a late 19th-century tourist would have approached ...
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Library of Congress
Panama Canal—West Lirio Slide
This 1923 photograph from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress documents a recent landslide in the West Lirio section of the Panama Canal and its effects on eastbound and westbound shipping. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his ...
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Library of Congress
On the Saimaa Canal. Finland
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress
River Steamboat "Okeehumkee" by Landing
The rivers and springs of Florida attracted tourists from the northern states of the United States, and from abroad, after the end of the Civil War. This image, from about 1886, shows the Okeehumkee, one of the Florida steamboats specially designed to navigate narrow, often shallow interior waterways to ferry tourists and merchants to cities and settlements away from the Atlantic and Gulf coasts. Vermont-born Hubbard L. Hart (1827–95) was an entrepreneur and developer of travel routes in Georgia and Florida who pioneered a line of Florida steamboats, which ...
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State Library and Archives of Florida
Rafts on the Peter the Great Canal. City of Shlisselburg. Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress
Guardhouse at the Thirty-Second Verst of the Emperor Peter the Great Canal. Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
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Library of Congress
Tow Rope Bridge in the Village of Lava. Russian Empire
The Mariinskii Canal system links Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin. Among the system’s components is the Old Ladoga Canal, where this view was taken near the fortress town of Shlisselburg. Visible on the far side of the canal is a granite outflow regulator built at the end of the 18th century. The structure serves as a bridge for the canal towpath. Behind the far bridge railing, with granite posts, is a wooden house known as the Prokhorov dacha, which originally belonged to Vasilii A. Prokhorov (1818–82 ...
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Library of Congress
Village of Naziia. Emperor Peter the Great Canal. Russian Empire
The Mariinsky Canal System (now known as the Volga-Baltic Waterway) links Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin. Among the system’s components was the Old Ladoga Canal, formerly known as the Emperor Peter I Canal, which followed the southern shore of Lake Ladoga and was intended to protect shipping from the sudden storms that frequently arose over the lake. By the late 19th century this canal had silted up and was replaced with a parallel New Ladoga Canal. This 1901 photograph shows the village of Naziia, located where the ...
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Library of Congress
Right Bank of the Onezhskii Canal. Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Barge on the Mariinskii Canal System. Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Stone-Excavating Machine in the Canal. Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Onezhskii Canal near Voznesene. Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Tank Barge of the Nobel Brothers. Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Type of Old Sluice Gates. Belozerskii Canal. Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Flat-Bottomed Canal Boat. Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Near the Small Town of Iustili, on the Saimaa Canal
This idyllic autumn view was taken in 1903 on the Saimaa Canal near the village of Juustila, situated to the northwest of Saint Petersburg in what was then the Grand Duchy of Finland. Opened for transportation in 1856 and renovated in the 20th century, the Saimaa Canal is 57 kilometers in length and connects Lake Saimaa (Finland) with the Gulf of Finland near the city of Vyborg (present-day Leningrad Oblast). The canal now operates by joint agreement between Russia and Finland. Juustila was the site of villas for Vyborg’s ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
On the Saimaa Canal. Finland
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress