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Products of Mexico and Central America
This black-and-white sketch map showing the products of Mexico and Central America was prepared for publication in the Bulletin of the Pan American Union. It is now preserved in the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States, successor organization to the Pan American Union. Typed or written on the map are the locations of centers of both agricultural and mineral production. The map shows mineral production located mainly in Mexico, with asphalt, coal, gold, lead, petroleum, precious stones (opals), quicksilver (mercury), and silver listed. Mexico is also shown ...
Contributed by
Columbus Memorial Library, Organization of American States
Map of Bolivia, Showing Forest and Agriculture Areas, and Mineral Localities
This 1912 map shows the agricultural, forest, and mineral wealth of Bolivia. Mineral production is shown as located mainly in the western part of the country, in or near the Andes Mountains. The locations of mines producing antimony, bismuth, copper, gold, lead, silver, wolfram, and tin, Bolivia’s most important mineral product, are indicated. Tin was mined in the departments of Cochabamba, La Paz, Oruro, and Potosí. Production boomed in the late-19th century–early 20th century, as the extension of the rail line to Oruro made possible the export of ...
Contributed by
Columbus Memorial Library, Organization of American States
Grading Dried Tea. Yangloudong Village, Hubei Province, China, 1874
In 1874-75, the Russian government sent a research and trading mission to China to seek out new overland routes to the Chinese market, report on prospects for increased commerce and locations for consulates and factories, and gather information about the Dungan Revolt then raging in parts of western China. Led by Lieutenant Colonel Iulian A. Sosnovskii of the army General Staff, the nine-man mission included a topographer, Captain Matusovskii; a scientific officer, Dr. Pavel Iakovlevich Piasetskii; Chinese and Russian interpreters; three non-commissioned Cossack soldiers; and the mission photographer, Adolf Erazmovich ...
Contributed by
National Library of Brazil
Tea Drying and Roasting before Transportation. Yangloudong Village, Hubei Province, China, 1874
In 1874-75, the Russian government sent a research and trading mission to China to seek out new overland routes to the Chinese market, report on prospects for increased commerce and locations for consulates and factories, and gather information about the Dungan Revolt then raging in parts of western China. Led by Lieutenant Colonel Iulian A. Sosnovskii of the army General Staff, the nine-man mission included a topographer, Captain Matusovskii; a scientific officer, Dr. Pavel Iakovlevich Piasetskii; Chinese and Russian interpreters; three non-commissioned Cossack soldiers; and the mission photographer, Adolf Erazmovich ...
Contributed by
National Library of Brazil
Tea Wholesaler Testing and Tasting Teas. Yangloudong Village, Hubei Province, China, 1874
In 1874-75, the Russian government sent a research and trading mission to China to seek out new overland routes to the Chinese market, report on prospects for increased commerce and locations for consulates and factories, and gather information about the Dungan Revolt then raging in parts of western China. Led by Lieutenant Colonel Iulian A. Sosnovskii of the army General Staff, the nine-man mission included a topographer, Captain Matusovskii; a scientific officer, Dr. Pavel Iakovlevich Piasetskii; Chinese and Russian interpreters; three non-commissioned Cossack soldiers; and the mission photographer, Adolf Erazmovich ...
Contributed by
National Library of Brazil
Thousands of Live Alligators on Free Exhibition
This broadside, dating from about 1950, is an advertisement for Osky’s, also known as Osky’s Curio Shop or Osky’s Alligator Store, a Jacksonville mercantile store that sold gift items, rare or bizarre decorative items, and goods made out of alligator skin, including lamps, purses, and wallets. The shop also exhibited live alligators and other reptiles. Jacksonville was home to many of Florida’s earliest tourist attractions, including the Florida Alligator Farm. Operating for several decades on Jacksonville’s historic Bay Street, Osky’s promoted itself through postcards ...
Contributed by
State Library and Archives of Florida
Gathering Rubber Sap, Java, Indonesia
This photograph of workers at a rubber plantation in Java, Indonesia is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
A Large Proportion of Interior Ireland Consists of Bogs from Which Peat Is Dug
This photograph of a peat cutter and a woman at a bog in Ireland is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Tapping a Rubber Tree, Motagua Valley, Guatemala
This photograph from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress shows a man tapping a rubber tree in the valley of the Motagua River in Guatemala. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Braden Copper Mines, Sewell, Chile
This photograph from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress shows the Braden Copper Mines in the town of Sewell, located on the slopes of the Andes Mountains in Cachapoal Province, Chile. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
An Earthen Hell. The Women Dressed in Rags Stand All Day in Hot Oil Shoveling up the Refuse to a Terrace above Them and Thence into Cars So That Not a Speck of Oil Is Wasted...
This 1923 photograph depicting a scene from the early history of the petroleum industry in Romania is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16 ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
A Zero Job! Shoveling Out Refuse from the Hot Pools of Oil That Comes up from a Spouting Well
This 1923 photograph depicting a scene from the early history of the petroleum industry in Romania is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16 ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Successive Stages of Grinding a Stone Egg. Imperial Lapidary Works, Ekaterinburg
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Tea Factory in Chakva. Chinese Foreman Lau-Dzhen-Dzhau
By the beginning of the 20th century, the plantation and processing plants at Chakva, Georgia, north of the port of Batumi, had become one of the main suppliers of tea to the Russian Empire. Seen here is the leading Chinese specialist at the Chakva tea plantation, Lau-Dzhan-Dzhau, who is dressed in a traditional Chinese style. Proudly displayed on his silk tunic is a Russian medal in recognition of his substantial contribution to the demanding and highly profitable cultivation of tea. Behind him are carefully tended trellised rows of plants arranged ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Drying Ovens for Tea. Tea Factory in Chakva
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Packaging Department. Borzhom
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Weighing Tea: Ceylon
This photograph of work in the tea industry of Ceylon is from the George Grantham Bain Collection at the Library of Congress. The collection contains approximately 40,000 glass plate negatives and 50,000 photographic prints, most dating from the 1900s to the mid-1920s. Bain, who was born in 1865 and died in 1944, founded the New York-based Bain News Service in 1898. Specializing in news about New York City and to a lesser degree the eastern United States, Bain distributed its own pictures, and those purchased from other commercial ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Village of Razsolnaia. Extraction of Brown Iron Ore. Chusovaia River
The Chusovaya River originates in the southern Urals, flows some 590 kilometers to the northwest, and empties into the Kama River near the city of Perm. Bounded in many places by high, rocky cliffs, the Chusovaya was known for its dramatic scenery. The village of Rassol’naia, shown here, is perched on the riverbank, with a forest of tall firs in the background. Among the barns and sheds is a large two-story log house. The original caption indicates that this area was a source for rich brown iron ore. A ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Men Crafting Feluccas and Canoes, Province of Barbacoas
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows two men at work building boats in Barbacoas (present-day Nariño Department), Colombia. Located in the far southwest of Colombia near the border with Ecuador, Barbacoas is both a town and was the name of a province when Paz painted this picture. The man on the left is finishing a canoe. Behind the individual on the right is a felucca, inside the rough shelter. Transport of goods by river to the Pacific Ocean was an important aspect of the provincial economy of ...
Contributed by
National Library of Colombia
Cigar Maker, Province of Cauca
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows a cigar maker, a common sight in 19th-century Colombia, where tobacco was an important export crop. The woman is sitting on the floor of the shop rolling tobacco leaves, while a man wearing a ruana (poncho) enters the shop carrying a basket. In the background are blue sky and a palm tree. The scene is set in the Province of Cauca (present-day Cauca Department) in southwest Colombia. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the ...
Contributed by
National Library of Colombia
Franklin Marble Mantel Manufactory, Race Street between 6th and 7th Street, Philadelphia
This lithograph of 1831 depicts the Franklin Marble Mantel Manufactory, located on Race Street between 6th and 7th Streets in Philadelphia. A sign on the facade of the building advertises “Marble Mantels, Tombs &c. neatly executed by Peter Fritz.” Workmen are seen on the sidewalk alongside the building while a clerk looks out the front door. The print was published in James Mease and Thomas Porter's Picture of Philadelphia from 1811 to 1831: Giving an Account of its Origin, Increase and Improvements in Arts, Sciences, Manufactures, Commerce and Revenue (Philadelphia, 1831). The illustration is by William L. Breton, a watercolorist and early lithographer of Philadelphia scenes, who was active in the city between about 1825 and 1855. Born in England circa 1773, Breton immigrated to Philadelphia around 1824. In the late 1820s, he contributed illustrations to Annals of Philadelphia, compiled by the antiquarian John F. Watson. In 1829 Breton entered the lithographic trade to execute the illustrations for the Annals. He worked extensively with the firm of Kennedy & Lucas, operated by David Kennedy and William B. Lucas, which produced Annals of Philadelphia. Breton also contributed to other publications at this time, including Mease and Porter's Picture of Philadelphia, also produced by Kennedy & Lucas, the first commercial lithographers in Philadelphia.
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia