10 results in English
Suffrage Parade, New York City, May 6, 1912
The suffrage parade was a new development in the fight for women’s suffrage in the United States. It was a bold tactic, adopted by suffragists and the more militant suffragettes shortly after the turn of the century. Although some women chose to quit the movement rather than march in public, others embraced the parade as a way of publicizing their cause and combating the idea that women should be relegated to the home. Parades often united women of different social and economic backgrounds. Because they were carried out in ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Meeting Minutes of the First Plenary Session of the Cabildo of Gran Canaria
The Cabildo de Gran Canaria (Council of Gran Canaria) is an administrative and legislative body that was first formed in 1913 under the Ley de Cabildos (Councils Act) passed the previous year in the Kingdom of Spain. Such councils were an instrument of governance used by the old regime in both the Canary Islands and the Americas. During the dictatorship of Francisco Franco members of the Cabildo were appointed by the government, and its functions were limited to administration, focusing on such matters as public health and welfare and roads ...
Letter by Mahatma Gandhi Addressed to Slovak Dušan Makovický
Presented here is a letter by Mahatma Gandhi (1869−1948) received by Dušan Makovický (1866−1921), a Slovak who was personal physician and secretary to Russian novelist Count Leo Tolstoy (1828−1910). Makovický lived with Tolstoy at his estate Yasnaya Polyana, located some 200 kilometers from Moscow. In the letter, Gandhi thanks Makovický for his explication of Tolstoy’s views on the concept of passive resistance. Probably the only original Gandhi manuscript preserved in the collections of any Slovak institution, the document is a testimony to the unique contacts the ...
Contributed by Slovak National Library
Draft of the "Petition for the Establishment of a Popularly Elected Assembly" (Three Versions)
In January 1874, Japan’s first political party, Aikoku Kōtō (Public Party of Patriots), was established by Itagaki Taisuke, Gotō Shōjirō, Soejima Taneoi, and Etō Shinpei (also seen as Eto Shimpei‏), a year after they had gone into opposition following the political upheaval of 1873, when the governing alliance of senior officials split over a proposed military expedition against Korea. Gotō and Itagaki were among the leaders of the losing faction, most of whom had favored the expedition. They were also joined by Furusawa Shigeru, who had returned from studying ...
Contributed by National Diet Library
Draft of the "Public Party of Patriots Pledge"
In January 1874, the first political party in Japan, Aikoku Kōtō (Public Party of Patriots), was established by Itagaki Taisuke, Gotō Shōjirō, Soejima Taneoi, and Etō Shinpei (also seen as Eto Shimpei‏), a year after they had gone into opposition following the political upheaval in 1873, when the governing alliance of senior officials split over a proposed military expedition against Korea. Gotō and Itagaki were among the leaders of the losing faction, most of whom had favored the expedition. They were also joined by Furusawa Shigeru, who had returned from ...
Contributed by National Diet Library
Draft of the "Public Party of Patriots Appended Pledge"
In January 1874, the first political party in Japan, Aikoku Kōtō (Public Party of Patriots), was established by Itagaki Taisuke, Gotō Shōjirō, Soejima Taneoi, and Etō Shinpei (also seen as Eto Shimpei‏), a year after they had gone into opposition following the political upheaval in 1873, when the governing alliance of senior officials split over a proposed military expedition against Korea. Gotō and Itagaki were among the leaders of the losing faction, most of whom had favored the expedition. They were also joined by Furusawa Shigeru, who had returned from ...
Contributed by National Diet Library
Draft Proposal of the “Rikken Seiyukai (Association of Friends of Constitutional Government) Bylaws”
Itō Hirobumi (1841−1909) had mulled over the formation of a new party in Japan, to be composed mainly of his supporters from among the government bureaucrats, with support from the urban commercial-industrial interests. At the same time, the Constitutional Party led by Hoshi Tōru, in collaboration with powerful figures from the clan-dominated government, were exploring ways to accede to power. Both those groups joined forces to form the Rikken Seiyūkai (Association of Friends of Constitutional Government) on September 15, 1900. It is said that more than 1,400 people ...
Contributed by National Diet Library
Copy of “Rikken Seiyukai (Association of Friends of Constitutional Government) Bylaws”
Itō Hirobumi (1841−1909) had mulled over the formation of a new party in Japan, to be composed mainly of his supporters from among the government bureaucrats, with support from the urban commercial-industrial interests. At the same time, the Constitutional Party led by Hoshi Tōru, in collaboration with powerful figures from the clan-dominated government, were exploring ways to accede to power. Both those groups joined forces to form the Rikken Seiyūkai (Association of Friends of Constitutional Government) on September 15, 1900. It is said that more than 1,400 people ...
Contributed by National Diet Library
Republic of Malawi, July 4-7 1966, Souvenir Programme
This 1966 souvenir program celebrates the declaration of Malawi as a republic. Malawi (formerly Nyasaland) became an independent member of the British Commonwealth on July 6, 1964, and adopted a republican constitution two years later. The move to the republican form of government was primarily the work of Hastings Kamuzu Banda (1896?-1997), who served as prime minister in 1964-66 and as the country’s first president from 1966 until 1994. Banda was trained as a doctor in the United States and the United Kingdom and practiced medicine in London ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Presidential Succession of 1910: The National Democratic Party
La sucesión presidencial en 1910: El Partido Nacional Democrático (The presidential succession of 1910: the National Democratic Party) caused an immediate sensation among the political class in Mexico when it was published in late 1908. The book’s author, Francisco I. Madero, was a member of a prominent family of landowners and businessmen from the state of Coahuila. Madero was committed to liberal politics and for many years provided intellectual and material support to dissidents arrayed against the government of Porfirio Díaz (president 1876–1911, except for 1880–84 and ...