13 results in English
The Wonderful Story of Uganda. To Which is Added the Story of Ham Mukasa, Told by Himself
The Wonderful Story of Uganda by the Reverend Joseph Dennis (J.D.) Mullins is an account of the mission to Uganda undertaken in the 1870s by the London-based Church Missionary Society (CMS) and the spread of Christianity in Uganda in the following decades. Mullins characterized the mission as “a Christian miracle of modern days. A nation situated in Central Africa, which twenty-five years ago had not received the Gospel, and had not even a written language, is to-day the home of thirty thousand Christians under Christian chiefs; its language has ...
Uganda in Transformation: 1876–1926
Herbert Gresford Jones (1870–1958) was an Anglican cleric and missionary to Uganda. He studied at Cambridge University and was ordained in 1895. After serving as a vicar at churches in England and as a chaplain with the British forces in World War I, he went to Uganda in 1920, where he was bishop suffragan of Kampala until 1923. Uganda in Transformation: 1876–1926 is Jones’s account of the development of the Anglican Church in Uganda since the arrival of the first British missionaries in 1877. In a series ...
Uganda by Pen and Camera
Charles William Hattersley (1866–1934) was a British missionary who joined the Church Missionary Society in early 1897 after having managed a cutlery works in Sheffield. In September of that year he left England for Uganda, where he helped to set up the system of primary education, was involved in educating the sons of Ugandan chiefs, and eventually served as headmaster of the Church Missionary Society school on Mengo Hill in Kampala. An enthusiastic amateur photographer, Hattersley became the official photographer to the Ugandan court and the church. His Uganda ...
In Uganda for Christ: The Life Story of the Rev. John Samuel Callis B.A., of the Church Missionary Society
In Uganda for Christ is a biography of the Reverend John Samuel Callis (1870–97), an early Christian missionary to Uganda. Callis was born in England and graduated from Saint Catharine’s College, Cambridge. Moved by the death of his eldest sister, he decided to dedicate his life to the church. After studying theology and working among the poor in London, he was ordained an Anglican priest on May 28, 1893. He served three years as curate outside London and then offered himself to the Church Missionary Society for the ...
The Church in Uganda: A Charge to the Missionaries of the Uganda Mission, 1913
The Church in Uganda: A Charge to the Missionaries of the Uganda Mission, 1913 contains the text of a document by J.J. Willis, bishop of Uganda, addressed to the Anglican missionaries in Uganda on the eve of the 1913 meeting of the Uganda synod. The document has two parts: the first is an overview of the situation of the church in Uganda and of the work done in the previous year; the second part deals with problems encountered by the Uganda mission in the field. The report on the ...
Duty of the Church to the Empire and the World: Especially to Africa
Duty of the Church to the Empire and the World: Especially to Africa is a report to an Anglican Church congress by the Reverend Alfred R. Tucker (1849-1914), who had served as the first bishop of Uganda from 1899 to 1911. Tucker made three main points: the work of evangelism in Africa should be assumed, to the greatest possible extent, by native Africans; church government should be based on African national or tribal methods; and education in the vernacular—in the local languages—was a great duty of the church ...
Policy of the Uganda Mission
Policy of the Uganda Mission is the report by J.J. Willis (1872–1954) that he presented to an Anglican Church congress in July 1912, the same year that he became the second bishop of Uganda, succeeding Alfred R. Tucker. The report begins with an overview of the area, population, and the church’s missionary policy in the six provinces of the Diocese of Uganda. This is followed by sections on church organization, education, discipline, finance, and the role, both positive and in some respects problematic, of European settlers in ...
Ecclesia Anglicana: For What Does She Stand?
Frank Weston (1871–1924) was an Anglican clergyman who served as bishop of Zanzibar (present-day Tanzania) in 1908–24. He was a staunch Anglo-Catholic, meaning he belonged to the wing of the Anglican Church that emphasized the church’s continuity with its Roman Catholic heritage rather than its Protestant identity. Weston became involved in the bitter Kikuyu controversy of 1913–14, which arose from a 1913 conference in Kikuyu (present-day Kenya), British East Africa, where Anglicans, Methodists, and Presbyterians agreed to federate in response to a perceived threat from non-Christian ...
Steps towards Reunion: A Statement for the Consultative Committee
At a conference in Kikuyu (present-day Kenya) in 1913, British missionaries from the Anglican, Methodist, and Presbyterian churches agreed to a Scheme of Federation to help them compete with non-Christian groups in Africa and to avoid transplanting the “unhappy divisions” among the churches of Britain to the mission field. The conference gave rise to a bitter controversy within the Anglican Church. Frank Weston, bishop of Zanzibar (present-day Tanzania), objected to federation with the other churches. He accused two of the leading Anglicans involved in the conference, William George Peel, bishop ...
The Case against Kikuyu: A Study in Vital Principles
Frank Weston (1871–1924) was an Anglican clergyman who served as bishop of Zanzibar (present-day Tanzania) in 1908–24. He was a staunch Anglo-Catholic, meaning he belonged to the wing of the Anglican Church that emphasized the church’s continuity with its Roman Catholic heritage rather than its Protestant identity. Weston became involved in the bitter Kikuyu controversy of 1913–14, which arose from a 1913 conference in Kikuyu (present-day Kenya), British East Africa, where Anglicans, Methodists, and Presbyterians agreed to federate in response to a perceived threat from non-Christian ...
Kikuyu
At a conference in Kikuyu (present-day Kenya) in 1913, British missionaries from the Anglican, Methodist, and Presbyterian churches agreed to a Scheme of Federation to help them compete with non-Christian groups in Africa and to avoid transplanting the “unhappy divisions” among the churches of Britain to the mission field. The conference gave rise to a bitter controversy within the Anglican Church. Frank Weston, bishop of Zanzibar (present-day Tanzania), objected to federation with the other churches. He accused the leading Anglicans involved in the conference, William George Peel, bishop of Mombasa ...
Eighteen Years in Uganda and East Africa
Eighteen Years in Uganda and East Africa is an account in two volumes by Alfred R. Tucker (1849–1914) of his work as Anglican bishop of Eastern Equatorial Africa in 1890–99 and as the first bishop of Uganda from 1899 until 1908, when the book was published. Volume 1 includes a review of the early history of European involvement in East Africa, from the arrival of the first Church Missionary Society (CMS) missionary in Mombasa (present-day Kenya) in 1844. It recounts Tucker’s arrival in Africa in 1890 and ...
Tucker of Uganda: Artist and Apostle, 1849-1914
Tucker of Uganda: Artist and Apostle, 1849-1914 is a biography of Alfred R. Tucker, the first bishop of Uganda. The book traces Tucker’s early life in England, his training and success as an artist, his studies at Oxford, his work as an Anglican clergyman, and his call to go to Africa as a missionary. Consecrated bishop of Eastern Equatorial Africa by the Archbishop of Canterbury on April 25, 1890, Tucker left for Africa the same day. He made a survey trip of the Uganda Protectorate in late 1890–early ...