5 results
Prayer of Wessobrunn
This manuscript, dating from the early ninth century, contains the Wessobrunner Gebet (Prayer of Wessobrunn) and many other short works. The prayer itself, in prose, which gives the text as a whole its name, is preceded by a short creation poem, which, in nine lines of alliterative verse, seeks to explain the creation of the world out of chaos. This small literary monument is among the earliest written examples of poetry in Old High German. It has come down to us in a composite (mainly Latin) manuscript written before 814 ...
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Bavarian State Library
The Six Books of the Hexaemeron (The Six Days) by Ambrose
In his Hexaemeron, Saint Ambrose treats the six days of creation. In this manuscript, written in the Benedictine monastery of Saint Emmeram in Ratisbon (present-day Regensburg), Bavaria, the six days are illustrated with full-page pen drawings; another representation of the creator resting on the seventh day concludes the cycle. Representations of the Hexaemeron appear from the late 11th century onwards as a new subject of Romanesque illumination, above all in Bibles or in liturgical works, such as choir books and missals. The Ratisbon school of illumination, responsible for this work ...
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Bavarian State Library
The Science of Theology: Book Three
This manuscript contains an Arabic translation of a theological work in Latin by Jean-Claude (de la Poype) de Vertrieu (1655–1732), Bishop of Poitiers, France. Much of the work is in question and answer format, and the part included here discusses, among a number of topics, questions of law and custom, love, true worship, and doubt. The text was copied in the 19th century by a scribe named George, who resided in Dayr al-Qamar (the Monastery of the Moon) in south-central Lebanon.
Contributed by
Holy Spirit University of Kaslik
The Rewards of the Enlightened for their Defense of the Status of God’s Chosen Saints
Timbuktu (present-day Tombouctou in Mali), founded around 1100 as a commercial center for trade across the Sahara Desert, was also an important seat of Islamic learning from the 14th century onward. The libraries there contain many important manuscripts, in different styles of Arabic scripts, which were written and copied by Timbuktu’s scribes and scholars. These works constitute the city’s most famous and long-lasting contribution to Islamic and world civilization. This text explains the basic principles of Sufism, pointing out the various stages of knowledge that Sufi mystics pass ...
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Mamma Haidara Commemorative Library
The Goal of Seekers, a Commentary on the Work “The Mother of Proofs”
Timbuktu (present-day Tombouctou in Mali), founded around 1100 as a commercial center for trade across the Sahara Desert, was also an important seat of Islamic learning from the 14th century onward. The libraries there contain many important manuscripts, in different styles of Arabic scripts, which were written and copied by Timbuktu’s scribes and scholars. These works constitute the city’s most famous and long-lasting contribution to Islamic and world civilization. Bughyat al-Tālibīn li-mā Taḍammanatuhu Umm al-Barāhīn (The goal of seekers, a commentary on the work “The mother of ...
Contributed by
Mamma Haidara Commemorative Library