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The People of Taiwan Parading to a Ritual Sacrifice (for Generals Fan and Xie)
The annual ritual sacrifices for General Fan and Xie at the temple to the city gods in Taipei were especially important to the people of Taiwan during the period of Japanese occupation, which lasted from 1895 to 1945. Extra trains in and out of Taipei were scheduled to accommodate the crowds that came to this event from all over Taiwan.
Contributed by
National Central Library
Some of the Tsar's Gifts. Goritskii Monastery, Russian Empire
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Altar Image in the Church of John the Theologian. Russian Empire
A major component of the Volga-Baltic Waterway (formerly called the Mariinsk Canal System), linking Saint Petersburg with the Volga River basin, is the Sheksna River, which drains the southeastern part of White Lake (Beloe ozero). The original length of the Sheksna was 395 kilometers, from White Lake to the Sheksna’s confluence with the Volga at the town of Rybinsk. Resevoirs created in the mid-20th century submerged much of the land along the river. A lost landmark was the John the Baptist convent at the village of Leushino, located on ...
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Library of Congress
Iconostasis in the Chapel on the Site Where Mikhail Nikitich Romanov Was Imprisoned. The Village of Nyrob. Ural
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Ascension-Trinity Monastery, Church of St. Michael Malein (1731), South View, with Procession of the Cross, Saturday, August 12, 2000, Solikamsk, Russia
This view of the Procession of the Cross at the Ascension-Trinity Monastery in Solikamsk was taken in 2000 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. The procession took place on August 12, 2000, and was part of the rededication of the main monastic Church of the Trinity . In the background is the Church of St. Michael Malein. The Ascension Monastery was founded circa 1590 by local tradesmen and free peasants. Its buildings were ...
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Library of Congress
Antimens Sacramental Cloth from the Time of Empress Elizabeth Petrovna Kept in the City of Cherdyn Assumption Church
This photograph depicts an antimension (sacramental cloth) dating from the reign of Empress Elizabeth Petrovna (1742–61). The antimension (derived from the Greek for “in place of a table”) is an essential part of administering the Eucharist in the Orthodox liturgy and must be blessed by a bishop, whose property it remains. It indicates that the church is authorized to celebrate the Divine Liturgy, during which it is unfolded on the altar. As illustrated here, the square cloth usually contains images of the Descent from the Cross, the four Evangelists ...
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Library of Congress
Board with an Inscription on the Chapel of Our Savior. Cherdyn
Settled as early as the 9th century, Cherdyn became an important eastern outpost of Muscovy in the latter half of the 15th century. In January 1547, the settlement was attacked by a large force of Nogai Tatars. This iron tablet, attached to a wall of the Spas Nerukotvornyi (Chapel of the Savior), commemorates 85 people killed in the raid. At the top of the tablet is an image of the Orthodox cross. The conquest, in 1552 by Ivan the Terrible, of Kazan, capital of the Tatar khanate on the Volga ...
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Library of Congress
Vessels and Vozdukhi Sacramental Cloth Cover from 1793. During the War They Were Buried in a Grave. Borodino
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Vessels and Vozdukhi Sacramental Cloth Cover. A Gift from Alexander II to Borodino's Church. Borodino
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Tin Tabernacles and Pyxes from the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries. In the Rostov Museum. Rostov Velikii
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Some Articles from the Staritsa Monastery Sacristy: Saint Dionysius' Mitre, Saint Dionysius' Censer and Cross. Patriarch Iov's Cross
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Patriarch Iova's Sakkos Bishop's Robe. Staritsa Assumption Monastery
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Antimens Alter Table Cloth. Orsha Ascension Monastery Twenty-Two Versts from Tver
The Ascension Monastery at Orsha is located some 22 kilometers from Tver. Shown here are three antimensions (sacramental cloths) held at the monastery. The antimension (derived from the Greek for “in place of a table”) is an essential part of administering the Eucharist in the Orthodox liturgy and must be blessed by a bishop, whose property it remains. It indicates that the church is authorized to celebrate the Divine Liturgy, during which it is unfolded on the altar. The antimension usually contains images of the Descent from the Cross, the ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Church Utensils. Orsha Ascension Monastery, Twenty-Two Versts from Tver
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Intricate Icon Setting and a Cross. Orsha Ascension Monastery Twenty-Two Versts from Tver
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Shroud, a Gift from Dimitrii Ivanovich Godunov. Ipatevskii Monaster, Kostroma
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Second Shroud, a Gift from Dimitrii Ivanovich Godunov. Ipatevskii Monastery, Kostroma
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Censer. Gift from I. I. Godunov. In the Vestry of Ipatevskii Monastery. Kostroma
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Aspergillums with Handles, an Artistic Work. In the Vestry of the Ipatevskii Monastery. Kostroma
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Miter of the Patriarch Adrian. In the Vestry of the Ipatevskii Monastery. Kostroma
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Candle. In the Vestry of Ipatevskii Monastery. Kostroma
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944) used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire.
Contributed by
Library of Congress