7 results in English
Etymology
Etymologiae (Etymology) is the best known work by Saint Isidore of Seville (circa 560–636), a scholar and theologian considered the last of the great Latin Church Fathers. It takes its name from a method of teaching that proceeds by explaining the origins and meaning of each word related to a topic. Saint Isidore drew on many different sources in his attempt to summarize all ancient knowledge and save it for posterity. The fame of the work led to it being widely copied and disseminated, and its popularity lasted even ...
Contributed by National Library of Spain
"Jottings at the Dream Brook Studio," in the Family Collection of Chen Guyu, in 26 Juan
Mengxi bi tan (Jottings at the Dream Brook Studio) was written in encyclopedic form as a collection of hundreds of articles by Shen Kuo (1031−95), a Song polymath, scientist, statesman, and artist. The work was written at Mengxi (Dream Brook) Garden, his estate in Runzhou (near present-day Zhenjiang, Jiangsu), thus the title. This work’s extraordinarily broad coverage includes astronomy, physics, mathematics, geology, geography, biological medicine, contemporary politics, military affairs, economics, and anecdotes about the arts and literature. It is also a very important document in the history of ...
Contributed by National Library of China
Etymology, Books 1-9
Etymologiae (Etymology) by Saint Isidore of Seville (circa 560−636) is an extensive encyclopedia of the knowledge of Late Antiquity. The opus was widely circulated and read in the Middle Ages. Isidore dedicated his work to Bishop Braulio of Zaragoza (circa 585−circa 651), who copied it after Isidore’s death. This manuscript of Etymologiae was produced at the abbey of Prüfening near Ratisbon (present-day Regensburg) in circa 1160−65. Today it contains only the first nine books of the etymologies, although the catalogue of Prüfening Abbey from 1347 mentions ...
Contributed by Bavarian State Library
Trilingual Manuscript Copy of Part Two of Antonio de Nebrija’s “Dictionarium ex Hispaniensi in Latinum Sermonem”
Fray Bernardino de Sahagún was a Franciscan missionary who arrived in Mexico from Spain in 1529 and stayed until his death in 1590. He worked with the indigenous peoples of the area to document their cultures and religions, in large part motivated by the conviction that better understanding of their beliefs and practices would improve the efforts to convert them to Christianity. His methods have led some scholars to consider him the first ethnohistorian, and he is remembered today as much for his ethnographic and linguistic documentation of the Nahua ...
Contributed by The Newberry Library
Notes to the Complete Library of the Four Treasuries, Edited with Supplements
Even though the title indicates that this work is a supplement to Quan shu bei kao (Notes to the complete library of the four treasures), the existence of such a work cannot be confirmed. This edition contains very finely executed illustrations, which are of sociological and historical as well as artistic importance. Each volume has an inscription certifying that the volume was produced by Zheng Shangxuan at the printing shop, Ren Rui Tang (Hall of auspicious mankind). The contents of the work were mostly taken from Bu qiu ren (Not ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Meccan Revelations
Muḥyiddin ibn Arabi (1165–1240 AD, 560–638 AH), also known as al-Shaykh al-Akbar (the Great Shaykh), was a Muslim mystic and philosopher of Andalusian origin. He was born in Murcia but his family later moved to Seville. Ibn Arabi’s life was divided almost equally between West and East. After traveling extensively in North Africa, he embarked on a spiritual journey from his native Spain. He arrived in Mecca in 1202, where he spent three years. He then spent years traveling in Syria, Palestine, Iraq, and Turkey. He died ...
Contributed by Bibliotheca Alexandrina
The Golden Encyclopedia of Islamic Sciences
Born in Cairo and educated in Egypt, the United States, and Great Britain, Dr. Fatima Mahjoub is a historian, linguist, and author specializing in encyclopedias. Al-mawsoo’a al-thahabiya lil ‘aloom al-Islamiya (The golden encyclopedia of Islamic sciences) is one of three encyclopedias she has written. Organized according to the Arabic alphabet and published in nine volumes, the work covers nine branches or fields of Islamic scholarship in religious studies, such as Quran exegesis, Islamic doctrine, and Islamic jurisprudence. The encyclopedia also includes entries on sciences in which Muslim scholars excelled ...
Contributed by Bibliotheca Alexandrina