Narrow results:

Place

Time Period

Topic

Additional Subjects

Type of Item

Language

Institution

A Dream Play
August Strindberg (1849–1912) was one of Sweden’s most important writers. From the 1870s until his death, he was a dominant figure in Swedish literary circles. Internationally, he is known for his plays. Strindberg grew up in Stockholm and studied at Uppsala University. From 1874 to 1882 he worked at the National Library of Sweden in Stockholm. It was there that he acquired much of his considerable knowledge of cultural history and literature. His breakthrough came in 1879 with publication of the novel The Red Room. Strindberg traveled extensively ...
Contributed by
National Library of Sweden
Topsy-Turvy Land: Arabia Pictured for Children
Samuel Zwemer (1867–1952) was an American missionary who became known as the “Apostle to Islam” for his strenuous if not always successful evangelization efforts in Islamic countries. He attended Hope College in Holland, Michigan, and the New Brunswick Seminary in New Jersey. In 1889 he and a classmate founded the American Arabian Mission, which later received sponsorship from the Reformed Church. The next year he departed for the Arabian Peninsula. In 1896 he met and married Amy Wilkes (died 1937), an Australian fellow missionary and nurse. The Zwemers spent ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Germany and Its Colonies: Travels through the Empire and Its Overseas Possessions, with the Collaboration of Arthur Achleitner, Johannes Biernatzki, et al.
This 538-page work with its 1,367 illustrations reflects German national pride in the early 20th century, a period of rapid economic growth and scientific and cultural achievement in the German Empire. Most of the book deals with Germany proper, which at that time included Alsace-Lorraine, conquered from France in the Franco-Prussian War of 1870-71. A concluding chapter is devoted to Germany’s overseas empire, which had grown rapidly since the achievement of national unity in 1871. Germany’s colonies included Togo, Cameroon, German South-West Africa (present-day Namibia), German East ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Across Iceland
This book is an account of a journey across central Iceland, from the northeast to the southwest, made in the summer of 1900 by a party of five men and one woman. The author and expedition leader, William Bisiker, was an English geographer associated with the Oxford School of Geography. The group included Arthur W. Hill, a noted botanist and later director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and the geologist Herbert H. Thomas, later a noted paleobiologist and archaeologist. In addition to the overland journey, the book recounts a ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
King Bihuazin [i.e. Béhanzin] of Dahomey, and His Two Wives [Standing on Porch]: French Government Prisoner in Martinique, Fort de France
This photograph was taken in Fort de France on the French island of Martinique around 1902. It shows the former King Béhanzin (1844-1906) of Dahomey (present-day Benin), who was banished to the Caribbean territory in 1894. The Kingdom of Dahomey, with its capital at Abomey, was founded in the 17th century. French colonial expansion into west Africa in the late 19th century and French efforts to suppress the slave trade led to conflict between France and the kingdom. In 1892, the kingdom was defeated in a war with France and ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
General View of Niagara Falls from Bridge
This Detroit Publishing Company photographic print from around 1901 shows Niagara Falls, the spectacular natural wonder on the Niagara River, which forms part of the border between Canada and the United States. The photograph is a cyanotype, a process that was invented in 1842 by the British astronomer and photography pioneer Sir John Herschel (1792-1871) and came into widespread use in the 1880s. Herschel discovered that water-soluble iron salts, when exposed to sunlight, form the compound known as Prussian Blue (a complex molecule that contains the compound cyanide, hence the ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
East African Official for Germany, Formerly a Sultan, Tanganyika, Africa
This photograph of an official in Tanganyika (present-day Tanzania) is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Commentary on "The Intersections of the Seas", Volume 2
Majma` al-Anhur fī Sharh Multaqā al-Abḥur (Commentary on "The intersections of the seas") is a commentary by 'Abd al-Rahman ibn Muhammad Shaikh-Zādeh (died 1667) on Multaqā al-Abḥur (The intersections of the seas) by Muhammad bin Ibrahim al-Halabi al-Hanafi (died 1549), an important Islamic jurist who was born in Syria and studied and worked in Cairo and Istanbul. The work deals with issues of jurisprudence disputed among scholars of the Hanafi Mahdab (one of the four schools of law within Sunni Islam). The commentary analyzes the terms and concepts, explains their ...
Contributed by
National Academic Library of the Republic of Kazakhstan, Astana
Lyric Poems of Hāfiz
Shams al-Dīn Muḥammad Shīrāzī (known as Hāfiz; circa 1320–90) is considered by many to be the greatest lyric poet of Persia (present-day Iran) and one of the most remarkable Eastern poets. Born to a poor family in Shiraz, where he lived most of his life, Hāfiz enjoyed the patronage of Shah Shujah for many years and in his last years that of Timur (Tamerlane). This work presents ghazals (lyric poems) of Hāfiz. As in all Sufi poetry, the ghazals are layered with meanings, from the most basic to the ...
Contributed by
National Academic Library of the Republic of Kazakhstan, Astana
In Memoriam. An Address, on the Occasion of the Service in Memory of Queen Victoria, February 2, 1901
“In Memoriam” is an address delivered by Alfred R. Tucker (1849–1914), bishop of Uganda, in the Cathedral Church of Saint Paul, Mengo, Uganda, on February 2, 1901, on the occasion of the service in memory of Queen Victoria, who had died on January 22. Tucker thanked God for Victoria’s “life and noble example,” her “wise and sympathetic rule,” and “that high and holy courage with which she bore the burdens of state.” Victoria’s reign, he concluded, “will stand out as the brightest and most glorious page in ...
Contributed by
National Library of Uganda
Homestead, Pennsylvania, 1902
This panoramic map shows Homestead, Pennsylvania, as it appeared in 1902. Homestead was the site of a major steel mill owned by Andrew Carnegie and of a bloody strike in 1892 resulting from a dispute between the Carnegie Steel Company and the steelworkers union. The index at the bottom indicates points of interest, including the steel works and other major industrial facilities, railroad stations, schools, churches, and the city’s Carnegie Library. The number and variety of houses of worship—a synagogue and churches for Presbyterian, Baptist, Lutheran, Polish Catholic ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 1902
This panoramic map shows Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, as it appeared in 1902. The numbered index at the bottom indicates points of interest, including major railroad stations, the post office, Fort Pitt blockhouse, the courthouse, and the Frick, Carnegie, and Park buildings. With its elevated view, the map shows the growth of the city along the banks of Monongahela and Allegheny Rivers, which meet at Pittsburgh to form the Ohio River. The panoramic map was a cartographic form popularly used to depict U.S. and Canadian cities and towns in the late ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
The Healing Gifts: Commentary on a Poem Explaining the Terminology of the Hanbali Mathhab
Al-minah al-shaafiyah bi sharh nazm al-mufradat al-waafiyah (The healing gifts: commentary on a poem explaining the terminology of the Hanbali mathhab) is an exposition on the mathhab (school of religious and juridical doctrine) of Imam Aḥmad ibn Muḥammad Ibn Ḥanbal (780–855). The title refers to the gifts that cure the thirst for knowledge, and the commentary expounds on the 1,000-line poem by Shams ad-Din Abu Abdullah Muhammad bin Ahmed ibn Abdul Hadi al-Maqdisi (died circa 1343). The work presented here is by Mansoor ibn Yousuf ibn Salahuddeen ibn ...
Contributed by
King Abdulaziz University Library