20 results in English
Zhu Category D: Romance and Love-Related Ceremonies - Ji Feng
The Naxi language spoken by the Naxi people of Yunnan Province, China, is the only pictographic writing system in the world still in use. A member of the Tibetan-Burman language family, Naxi has many of the tonal and symbolic aspects of Chinese. The Naxi language has four tones; each sound complex has many different meanings based on its tone. The Naxi Dongba script is used exclusively by the dongba (shamans/priests) as an aid to the recitation of ritual texts during religious ceremonies and shamanistic rituals. Many of the individual ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Minaret of Jamaa el Kebir (the Great Mosque) of Tetouan
This photograph by the Junta de Andalucia shows the Great Mosque of Tetouan, Morocco, the largest mosque in the medina of Tetouan and one of the city's most beautiful historical monuments. The Great Mosque was built in the early 19th century, near the city's old Jewish quarter, which was moved to its present location at the other end of the medina. An entire 19th-century quarter bearing the mosque's name developed around the mosque. The mosque's minaret was constructed as the highest point in the medina, and ...
Contributed by Tetouan-Asmir Association
Arena Circus (2001), Khabarovsk, Russia
This photograph of the Khabarovsk State Circus in Gagarin Park was taken in 2001 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Founded in 1858 as a military outpost, Khabarovsk (population over 600,000) is strategically located at the confluence of the Ussuri and Amur rivers near the Chinese border. As one of the most important Russian cities in the Far East, Khabarovsk has a broad array of cultural institutions, but until the early ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Church of the Dormition (1674), North Facade, Varzuga, Russia
This north view of the Church of the Dormition at Varzuga (Murmansk Oblast) was taken in 2001 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Varzuga is located on the south shore of the Kola Peninsula, some 22 kilometers from where the Varzuga River enters the White Sea. By the mid-15th century, Varzuga was a notable outpost in the White Sea territory of the medieval trading center of Novgorod. Varzuga also had strong ties ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Church of the Dormition (1674), West Facade Detail, Varzuga, Russia
This detail of the west facade of the Church of the Dormition at Varzuga (Murmansk Oblast) was taken in 2001 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Varzuga is located on the south shore of the Kola Peninsula, 22 kilometers from where the Varzuga River enters the White Sea. By the mid-15th century, Varzuga was a notable outpost in the White Sea territory of the medieval trading center of Novgorod. Varzuga also had ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Church of the Dormition (1674) (Left), and Church of St. Afanasii (1857) (Right), West Facade, Varzuga, Russia
This west view of the Church of the Dormition and the Church of Saint Afanasii in Varzuga (Murmansk Oblast) was taken in 2001 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Varzuga is located on the south shore of the Kola Peninsula, 22 kilometers from where the Varzuga River enters the White Sea. By the mid-15th century, Varzuga was a notable outpost in the White Sea territory of the medieval trading center of Novgorod ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Church of the Dormition (1674) (Left), and Church of St. Afanasii (1857) (Right), Northwest View, Varzuga, Russia
This northwest view of the Church of the Dormition and the Church of Saint Afanasii in Varzuga (Murmansk Oblast) was taken on a mid-summer's evening in 2001 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Varzuga is located on the south shore of the Kola Peninsula, 22 kilometers from where the Varzuga River enters the White Sea. By the mid-15th century Varzuga was a notable outpost in the White Sea territory of the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Church of the Kazan Icon of the Virgin (1694), West Facade, Ustiuzhna, Russia
This west view of the Church of the Kazan Icon of the Virgin in Ustiuzhna (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 2001 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located on the Mologa River (a tributary of the Volga River), Ustiuzhna was known already in the mid-13th century for its rich deposits of iron ore. It rapidly became one of the earliest Russian centers of metalworking and achieved special prominence in the 16th century ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Church of the Kazan Icon of the Virgin (1694), South Facade, Ustiuzhna, Russia
This south view of the Church of the Kazan Icon of the Virgin in Ustiuzhna (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 2001 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located on the Mologa River (a tributary of the Volga River), Ustiuzhna was known already in the mid-13th century for its rich deposits of iron ore. It rapidly became one of the earliest Russian centers of metalworking and achieved special prominence in the 16th century ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Cathedral of the Nativity of the Virgin (1685-90), South Facade, Ustiuzhna, Russia
This southwest view of the Cathedral of the Nativity of the Virgin in Ustiuzhna (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 2001 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located on the Mologa River (a tributary of the Volga River), Ustiuzhna was known already in the mid-13th century for its rich deposits of iron ore. It became one of the earliest Russian centers of metalworking and achieved special prominence in the 16th century. Although the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Log Grade School (Left Bank) (Early 20th Century), Ustiuzhna, Russia
This photograph of an early 20th-century log grammar school in Ustiuzhna (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 2001 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located on the Mologa River (a tributary of the Volga River), Ustiuzhna was known already in the mid-13th century for its rich deposits of bog iron. It became one of the earliest Russian centers of metalworking and achieved special prominence in the 16th century. Although the town was decimated ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Church of the Annunciation (1762), Northwest View, Ustiuzhna, Russia
This northwest view of the Church of the Annunciation in Ustiuzhna (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 2001 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located on the Mologa River (a tributary of the Volga River), Ustiuzhna was known already in the mid-13th century for its rich deposits of iron ore. It rapidly became one of the earliest Russian centers of metalworking and achieved special prominence in the 16th century. The town’s former ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Panorama, with Left Bank of Mologa River and Church of the Intercession (1780), Ustiuzhna, Russia
This northeast view toward the left (north) bank of the Mologa River at Ustiuzhna (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 2001 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. At 456 kilometers in length, the Mologa originates in Tver’ Oblast and flows through eastern Novgorod Oblast before entering Vologda Oblast, where it eventually empties into the Rybinsk Reservoir--a component of the Volga River. The Ustiuzhna settlement was known already in the mid-13th century for its ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Church of the Intercession (1780), Southwest View, Ustiuzhna, Russia
This southwest view of the Church of the Nativity of Christ in Ustiuzhna (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 2001 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located on the Mologa River (a tributary of the Volga River), Ustiuzhna was known already in the mid-13th century for its rich deposits of iron ore. It rapidly became one of the earliest Russian centers of metalworking and achieved special prominence in the 16th century. The town ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Church of the Kazan Icon of the Virgin (1694), Southwest View, Ustiuzhna, Russia
This southwest view of the Church of the Kazan Icon of the Virgin in Ustiuzhna (Vologda Oblast) was taken in 2001 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located on the Mologa River (a tributary of the Volga River), Ustiuzhna was known already in the mid-13th century for its rich deposits of iron ore. It rapidly became one of the earliest Russian centers of metalworking and achieved special prominence in the 16th century ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Cathedral of the Dormition (1711-1717), North Chapel of Saints Zosima and Savvatii, Northeast View, Kem', Russia
This northeast view of the Cathedral of the Dormition in Kem' (Karelia) was taken in 2001 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located on the southwest shore of the White Sea, the Kem’ region belonged to the medieval trading center of Novgorod until the end of the 15th century. In the 16th century, Kem’ became an important outpost on Muscovy’s northwest flank and served as a gateway to the Solovetskii Islands ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Cathedral of the Dormition (1711-1717), West Facade, Kem', Russia
This west view of the Cathedral of the Dormition in Kem' (Karelia) was taken in 2001 by Dr. William Brumfield, American photographer and historian of Russian architecture, as part of the "Meeting of Frontiers" project at the Library of Congress. Located on the southwest shore of the White Sea, Kem’ was not only an important settlement in its own right, but also served as a gateway to the Solovetskii Islands. Built in 1711-17, the Cathedral of the Dormition is one of the most interesting wooden structures in Russian architecture—and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Song of Solomon
This work is a modern artist’s edition of the biblical Song of Songs, traditionally attributed to King Solomon. The Song of Songs has been interpreted in different ways, ranging from literal interpretations that focus on human love between a man and a woman to those that see it as a divine allegory of God’s love for the Jewish people. This edition, by Israeli artist Tamar Messer, emphasizes the connection between the Jewish people and the Land of Israel. The text is in Hebrew and English. The original silk ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Panoramic View of Tetouan
This panoramic photograph of Tetouan, Morocco, by the Tetouan-Asmir Association shows the five century-old medina, the early 20th century Spanish colonial city (or Ensanche) on the edge of Mount Dersa, as well as newly urbanized areas that stretch ten kilometers eastwards towards some of the most beautiful beaches on the Mediterranean. The medina's whitewashed walls, which have earned the city the title of “the White Dove,” and the city’s mountains and beaches reflect the combination of man-made and natural beauty for which Tetouan is known. Located on the ...
Contributed by Tetouan-Asmir Association
Torres House
This photograph by the Junta de Andalucia shows a house of the prestigious Torres family in the medina of Tetouan, Morocco. One of the medina’s most impressive private houses, the house was built during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and is an example of Tetouan's Andalusian architecture at its peak. Its features include a courtyard, a wall fountain supplied by water from a natural underground spring, typical Tetouani tiles (known as zellij), carved wooden doors, and beautifully furnished sitting rooms. Located on the Mediterranean Sea east ...
Contributed by Tetouan-Asmir Association