13 results
Creation of the Fifth Sun Festival
The creation of the fifth sun is an important element in Aztec mythology about the origins of the world. This photograph from Mexico of a festival celebrating the creation of the fifth sun shows musicians in costume wearing distinctive headdresses. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of life and culture in the Americas. Many of the photographs were taken by prominent photographers on OAS missions to member countries. The OAS was established ...
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Columbus Memorial Library, Organization of American States
Oaxacan Feather Dancer
This photograph from Mexico shows the imposing figure of an Oaxacan dancer in an elaborate costume that features intricate, detailed designs of feathers and beads on the headdress, breastplate, and shield. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of life and culture in the Americas. Many of the photographs were taken by prominent photographers on OAS missions to member countries. The OAS was established in April 1948 when 21 countries of the western ...
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Columbus Memorial Library, Organization of American States
Aucaner Signal on Apintie
This photograph from Suriname shows a Maroon in a seated position beating an apintie, a drum made out of wood and wild boar skins. Maroon refers to fugitive slaves from the West Indies and the northern part of South America, and their descendants. The Maroon community was especially numerous in Suriname, a former Dutch colony in which many slaves managed to escape to the jungle. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of ...
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Columbus Memorial Library, Organization of American States
Dance to Fertility Goddess
This photograph from Suriname shows a group of women performing a fertility dance. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of life and culture in the Americas. Many of the photographs were taken by prominent photographers on OAS missions to member countries. The OAS was established in April 1948 when 21 countries of the western hemisphere adopted the OAS Charter, in which they reaffirmed their commitment to the pursuit of common goals and ...
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Columbus Memorial Library, Organization of American States
Goat Racing
This photograph from Trinidad and Tobago shows goats outfitted for racing being led by their handlers. In the sport of goat racing, the jockeys run behind the goats to urge them on, making the race a test of both human and animal endurance and speed. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of life and culture in the Americas. Many of the photographs were taken by prominent photographers on OAS missions to member ...
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Columbus Memorial Library, Organization of American States
Esquimos Selling Their Fur Dolls
This photograph of an Eskimo woman displaying traditional craft items is from the state of Alaska, in the United States. Eskimos are the main indigenous people of the Arctic and sub-Arctic regions of Alaska, Canada, Greenland, and Siberia. They also are known by their own word for themselves, Inuit, which means “people.” The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of life and culture in the Americas. Many of the photographs were taken by ...
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Columbus Memorial Library, Organization of American States
Hawaii Religious Dance, Each Movement has a Meaning
This photograph of three young women performing a religious dance in traditional costume is from the state of Hawaii in the United States. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of life and culture in the Americas. Many of the photographs were taken by prominent photographers on OAS missions to member countries. The OAS was established in April 1948 when 21 countries of the western hemisphere adopted the OAS Charter, in which they ...
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Columbus Memorial Library, Organization of American States
Woman Weaving (Lauhala Weaver)
This photograph of a woman engaged in lauhala weaving is from the state of Hawaii in the United States. Lauhala is the traditional Hawaiian art of weaving the leaves of the hala (or pandanus) tree. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of life and culture in the Americas. Many of the photographs were taken by prominent photographers on OAS missions to member countries. The OAS was established in April 1948 when 21 ...
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Columbus Memorial Library, Organization of American States
Polynesian Fertility Rites
This photograph of a Polynesian fertility ceremony is from the state of Hawaii in the United States. The Polynesians came to Hawaii about 2,000 years ago and were the first people to inhabit the islands. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of life and culture in the Americas. Many of the photographs were taken by prominent photographers on OAS missions to member countries. The OAS was established in April 1948 when ...
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Columbus Memorial Library, Organization of American States
The Ukulele: Portuguese Gift to Hawaii
This photograph of two young Polynesian women, one playing the ukulele, is from the state of Hawaii in the United States. The ukulele is a distinctively Hawaiian instrument, adapted from the small, four-string guitars brought to the islands by immigrant workers from Portugal in the 19th century. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of life and culture in the Americas. Many of the photographs were taken by prominent photographers on OAS missions ...
Contributed by
Columbus Memorial Library, Organization of American States
Polynesian Prayer
This photograph of a young Polynesian woman engaged in traditional prayer is from the state of Hawaii in the United States. The Polynesians came to Hawaii about 2,000 years ago and were the first people to inhabit the islands. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of life and culture in the Americas. Many of the photographs were taken by prominent photographers on OAS missions to member countries. The OAS was established ...
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Columbus Memorial Library, Organization of American States
Lucreaty Clark Weaving a White Oak Basket
Lucreaty J. Clark was born in 1904 in Lamont, Florida. She continued the craft of making white oak baskets, which she learned from her mother and father. Her parents originally made these sturdy baskets for use on the plantation where they lived and worked in north Florida, an area where white oaks are plentiful. The baskets were used to hold cotton and carry vegetables. Before making baskets, Clark would select a tree of the right size and, once cut down, would split the logs into thin strips or “splits.” White ...
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State Library and Archives of Florida
Cuban Refugee Breaks Down Upon his Arrival at Key West, Florida from Mariel, Cuba During the Mariel Boatlift
The Mariel Boatlift was a mass exodus of Cubans from Mariel Port on the island of Cuba to Florida between April and November 1980. Departure by boat was permitted by the Castro government after several years of improving relations between Cuba and the United States under President Jimmy Carter, a period that coincided with a severe downturn in the Cuban economy. Perhaps as many as 125,000 Cubans made the journey to Florida on overcrowded craft of varying size and seaworthiness. Political opinion in the United States began to turn ...
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State Library and Archives of Florida