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The Uganda Journal, Volume I, Number 1, January 1934
The Uganda Literary and Scientific Society was established at Entebbe, Uganda Protectorate, in 1923. Its main activity consisted of the reading of papers and the delivery of lectures on topics relating to Uganda. In 1933 the society moved its headquarters to Kampala and decided to issue a regular publication, The Uganda Journal. The journal’s declared aim was “to collect and publish information which may add to our knowledge of Uganda and to record that which in the course of time might be lost.” Four issues per year were published ...
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National Library of Uganda
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A Mill Worker Watches Over the Loading of Powder Fine Phosphate
Major phosphate deposits were first discovered in Florida in Alachua County in the early 1880s. By the turn of the century, phosphate mining was a major industry as phosphate seams were identified in central and southwestern Florida, and mining became an essential economic engine for cities such as Dunnellon, Newberry, and Mulberry. From hand mining with wheelbarrows and picks, to large-scale mechanized mining employing hydraulic pumps and draglines, the industry changed dramatically in the course of the 20th century. Phosphate rock must be separated from the mud and other materials ...
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State Library and Archives of Florida
New Constitution–Bright Life
This book was published in 1947 to popularize the new Japanese constitution. Entitled Atarashii Kenpō Akarui Seikatsu (New constitution–bright life), it was distributed to every household in the country. Among the aims of the Allied occupation of Japan that followed World War II was the establishment of a democratic government, based on a new liberal constitution and the expressed will of the Japanese people. The Kenpō Fukyū Kai (Constitution Popularization Society) was founded on December 1, 1946, as a result of pressure from occupation officials to “thoroughly popularize the ...
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National Diet Library
10 Explanatory Illustrations of the Constitution of Japan
These colored illustrations were produced by Nihon University in 1947 to provide a straightforward explanation of the fundamental principles of the new Japanese constitution. They convey such themes as "the rights and duties of the people," "the rights of the individual," and "equality of the people," using beautiful colors and humorous illustrations. These illustrations, together with books and documents, were commissioned by the Kenpō Fukyū Kai (Constitution Popularization Society), which was founded on December 1, 1946 to popularize the spirit of the new constitution and raise awareness of it in ...
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National Diet Library
Letter on Birch Bark from Siberia by Voldemārs Mežaks, June 29, 1947
On August 5, 1940, the independent country of Latvia was forcibly incorporated into the Soviet Union, after having been occupied by the Red Army in June of that year. Estonia and Lithuania suffered a similar fate. Thousands of Latvians were arrested for having anti-Soviet views, taking part in resistance movements, being farmers, belonging to political parties, or refusing to join a collective farm. Many were deported to Siberia. People who were in prisons, concentration camps, or settlements in Siberia wrote letters to friends and relatives on birch bark, which was ...
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National Library of Latvia
Letter on Birch Bark from Siberia by Ernests Kirķis, May 23, 1947
On August 5, 1940, the independent country of Latvia was forcibly incorporated into the Soviet Union, after having been occupied by the Red Army in June of that year. Estonia and Lithuania suffered a similar fate. Thousands of Latvians were arrested for having anti-Soviet views, taking part in resistance movements, being farmers, belonging to political parties, or refusing to join a collective farm. Many were deported to Siberia. People who were in prisons, concentration camps, or settlements in Siberia wrote letters to friends and relatives on birch bark, which was ...
Contributed by
National Library of Latvia