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Cuba
This detailed map of Cuba was published by the Rand McNally Company of Chicago in 1904. It shows provinces, principal cities and towns, and the 18 railroads then in operation in the country. The six provinces are indicated by different colors. A large inset map in the upper right shows the port and city of Havana; the key at the bottom of the main map indicates points of interest in Havana. Smaller inset maps depict Port Matanzas; Cardenas and Santa Clara Bays; the Port of Cienfuegos; and the Port of ...
Contributed by
Columbus Memorial Library, Organization of American States
Views of Great Tibet
These handwritten notes accompany a collection of 50 photographs of central Tibet acquired from the Imperial Russian Geographical Society in Saint Petersburg by the American Geographical Society on August 2, 1904. The photographs in this collection were taken by two Mongolian Buddhist lamas, G.Ts. Tsybikov and Ovshe (O.M.) Norzunov, who visited Tibet in 1900 and 1901. The notes were written in Russian for the Imperial Russian Geographical Society by Tsybikov, Norzunov, and other Mongolians familiar with central Tibet. Alexander Grigoriev, corresponding member of the American Geographical Society, translated ...
Contributed by
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Libraries
The Penetration of Arabia: A Record of the Development of Western Knowledge Concerning the Arabian Peninsula
David George Hogarth (1862–1927) was a British archaeologist and scholar who between 1887 and 1907 worked on excavations in Cyprus, Greece, and several countries of the Middle East. In 1904 he published The Penetration of Arabia, a work which, as the subtitle indicates, was an attempt to chronicle the growth of Western knowledge about the Arabian Peninsula, rather than a first-hand account based on travel to the region.  The book has two sections. “The Pioneers” analyzes the historical geography of the region from the time of Claudius Ptolemy (second ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Certified Charter Confirming the Election of Mikhail Fedorovich Romanov as Tsar of Moscow State
This book, published in Moscow in 1906, contains a copy of the certified charter confirming the election of Mikhail Fedorovich Romanov (1596−1645) as ruler of the Tsardom of Muscovy in 1613. The reproduction of the charter appears after page 96, following a lengthy introduction by Sergei A. Belokurov. Copies of the charter were made at Moscow University in 1904 by the Imperial Society of History and Antiquities of Russia to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the society. Belokurov, a historian of the Russian Orthodox Church and an active member ...
Contributed by
Boris Yeltsin Presidential Library
Crown of Roses, Issue 1, August 1904
Klílā d-warde (Crown of roses) was a magazine issued in Mosul (present-day Iraq) between August 1904 and July 1908. It was published by the Dominican Fathers, in the neo-Aramaic language using an East Syriac script, which was common to the Chaldean Catholics of the region. It contained devotional articles, with occasional coverage of cultural topics. The magazine was produced by a small staff of clergy based in Mosul. The Dominican presence in the city goes back to 1750, when Pope Benedict XIV sent a group of Italian friars to establish ...
Contributed by
Iraqi National Library and Archives
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Panama
This map of Panama was published in 1904, the year that construction of the Panama Canal began. The “Profile of the Panama Canal” at the top shows the plan for the canal. In 1881, a French company led by Ferdinand de Lesseps, the builder of the Suez Canal, had begun work on cutting a sea-level channel across the isthmus. The French venture collapsed in 1889 and work was halted. In 1903, the United States and Panama concluded the Hay-Bunau-Varilla Treaty that granted to the United States the right to build ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Korea
Angus Hamilton was a British journalist who reported for a number of newspapers and journals between 1894 and 1912. Among the events he covered were the Boer War in South Africa, the Boxer uprising in China, and the Russo-Japanese War of 1904–05. He spent several months in Korea as the Far East correspondent of the Pall Mall Gazette and produced this book on the basis of his observations. Korea was at the time little known in the West, and Hamilton’s book contained much information about the country’s ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
The African West and Catholic Missions, Congo and Oubangi
In the late 19th century, France competed with the International Congo Association of King Leopold of Belgium for control of the vast Congo River Basin. Under the leadership of the Franco-Italian explorer and empire builder Pierre Savorgnan de Brazza, between 1882 and 1891 France managed to conclude treaties with most of the rulers on the right bank of the river, placing their lands under French protection. In 1908, France organized its territories in the region into French Equatorial Africa, which included the colonies of Middle Congo (the present-day Republic of ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
The Uganda Protectorate: Attempt to Give Some Description of the Physical Geography, Botany, Zoology, Anthropology, Languages and History of the Territories under British Protection in East Central Africa
This two-volume work by Sir Henry Hamilton (Harry) Johnston, a British explorer, writer, and colonial official who spent much of his career in Africa, is an encyclopedic compilation of information about Uganda, which became a British protectorate in 1894. Johnston was asked by the crown, in 1899, to spend two years in Uganda as a special commissioner, in order to establish civilian administration after a period of disastrous military rule. He concluded an agreement with the ruling chiefs of Buganda that helped bring stability to the country. During his term ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Persia, Afghanistan and Baluchistan
This 1904 map of Persia (as Iran was then known), Afghanistan, and parts of present-day Pakistan is by the Americana Company of New York, publisher of the Encyclopedia Americana. Also included in the map are large parts of Central Asia (known as Turkestan) that were then part of the Russian Empire, the extreme western part of China, and the Persian Gulf. The late 19th and early 20th centuries were a period of intense rivalry for influence in this part of the world between the Russian and British empires. Railroad construction ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Full Map of Tibet
This map, dated July 1904, shows Tibet and surrounding regions. It was originally published in Russian and was translated into Chinese by the cartographic establishment of A. Ilyin, a prominent St. Petersburg-based map-production company founded in 1859 by Alexey Afinogenovich Ilyin. The firm published numerous geographical materials, including detailed atlases of the Russian Empire, as well as maps of various regions of Europe and Asia. The legend and summary in the bottom left corner explain that the green bands on the map mark the borders of districts, provinces, and neighboring ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Three Indian Children, Guatemala
This 1904 photograph from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress shows three Mayan Indian children in Guatemala. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
The Wonderful Story of Uganda. To Which is Added the Story of Ham Mukasa, Told by Himself
The Wonderful Story of Uganda by the Reverend Joseph Dennis (J.D.) Mullins is an account of the mission to Uganda undertaken in the 1870s by the London-based Church Missionary Society (CMS) and the spread of Christianity in Uganda in the following decades. Mullins characterized the mission as “a Christian miracle of modern days. A nation situated in Central Africa, which twenty-five years ago had not received the Gospel, and had not even a written language, is to-day the home of thirty thousand Christians under Christian chiefs; its language has ...
Contributed by
National Library of Uganda
The Humors, Devil to-Suppress "Kwai-Danzi"
The victory of Japan in the Russo-Japanese War of 1904–5, a collision over economic and political influence in Korea and Manchuria, marked the first victory of an Asian nation over a European power. This unexpected turn of events compelled the West to reassess the status of Japan in the international political order. Among Asian nations, it shattered the image of the invincibility of Western authority. While many in Japan were dissatisfied with the peace treaty that ended the war, Japan’s victory nevertheless confirmed the success of the Meiji ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Travel Views of Morocco
Arnold Genthe (1869-1942) was a German-born immigrant to America whose work included notable and historically important photographs of San Francisco’s Chinatown and its residents, portraits of presidents and society figures, and images of Anna Pavlova and other dancers. Genthe traveled to Morocco in 1904 to attend to the affairs of his brother Siegfried, who had been murdered there. Although he wrote at the time that he “was not in a frame of mind to appreciate the rich possibilities this North African country offered to [his] camera,” he managed to ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
La Coca, a Jarabe Dancer
This 1904 photograph of a female dancer in Mexico is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Lappland-Express to the Land of the Midnight Sun: Corridor Express Train Stockholm - Narvik
For centuries, Lapland has allured wayfarers and dazzled them with its magical geography and intrinsic cultural topography: the social environment of the indigenous Sami people, its rich and varied fauna, its seemingly endless natural resources, and the midnight sun. Field scientists, missionaries, tourists, or those simply driven by curiosity have, each for their own reasons, found their way to what is perhaps Europe’s last wilderness. This 1904 tourist poster by the Royal Administration of the Swedish State Railways advertises an express train to Lapland that ran from Stockholm, Sweden ...
Contributed by
National Library of Sweden
Farewell Present of Useful White Flag, Which Russian General's Wife Thoughtfully Gives When He Leaves for Front, Telling Him to Use It As Soon As He Sees Japanese Army
The Russo-Japanese War (1904–5) was documented in various forms of media, such as woodblock prints, photographs, and illustrations. The victories of the Japanese military in the early stages of the war inspired propaganda prints by Japanese artists. Kobayashi Kiyochika (1847–1915) contributed this farcical single-sheet print to the series, Nihon banzai hyakusen hyakushō (Long live Japan: 100 victories, 100 laughs). Kiyochika, known for producing woodblock prints using Western painting methods, had been under the brief tutelage of Charles Wirgman (1832–91), an English cartoonist for the Illustrated London News ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
General Kuropatkin Ready for Anything Awaits the Coming of the Japanese
The Russo-Japanese War (1904–5) was documented in various forms of media, such as woodblock prints, photographs, and illustrations. The victories of the Japanese military in the early stages of the war inspired propaganda prints by Japanese artists. Kobayashi Kiyochika (1847–1915) contributed this farcical single-sheet print to the series, Nihon banzai hyakusen hyakushō (Long live Japan: 100 victories, 100 laughs). Kiyochika, known for producing woodblock prints using Western painting methods, had been under the brief tutelage of Charles Wirgman (1832–91), an English cartoonist for the Illustrated London News ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Japan Holds the String When Russia Reaches to Grasp
The Russo-Japanese War (1904–5) was documented in various forms of media, such as woodblock prints, photographs, and illustrations. The victories of the Japanese military in the early stages of the war inspired propaganda prints by Japanese artists. Kobayashi Kiyochika (1847–1915) contributed this farcical single-sheet print to the series, Nihon banzai hyakusen hyakushō (Long live Japan: 100 victories, 100 laughs). Kiyochika, known for producing woodblock prints using Western painting methods, had been under the brief tutelage of Charles Wirgman (1832–91), an English cartoonist for the Illustrated London News ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Kuropatkin Secures Safety - Your Flag Does Not Work, Try Another
The Russo-Japanese War (1904–5) was documented in various forms of media, such as woodblock prints, photographs, and illustrations. The victories of the Japanese military in the early stages of the war inspired propaganda prints by Japanese artists. Kobayashi Kiyochika (1847–1915) contributed this farcical single-sheet print to the series, Nihon banzai hyakusen hyakushō (Long live Japan: 100 victories, 100 laughs). Kiyochika, known for producing woodblock prints using Western painting methods, had been under the brief tutelage of Charles Wirgman (1832–91), an English cartoonist for the Illustrated London News ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress