95 results in English
Argentine Railways, 1899
Intensive railroad development took place in Argentina between 1880 and 1916, a period of rapid economic growth and national consolidation. The railroads made possible Argentina’s emergence as a major exporter of wheat, beef, and other products. The most important railroads were owned and built by British companies, which were granted concessions by the Argentine government because of their technical expertise and their ability to raise large sums on the London market to finance the construction. This 1899 map, issued by the Buenos Ayres and Pacific Railway Company, of London ...
The Mirror of Orrery
Aiana-e Jahan Numa (The mirror of orrery) is a prose work of fables in Persian, which are relevant to both religious and worldly affairs. An orrery is a model representing the movements of heavenly bodies around the sun. The book was published in 1899 in Kabul by lithography. It is thought that it may derive in part from a work by Ḥusayn Vāʻiẓ Kāshifī, but the name of the author is unknown. This copy is arranged in several sections. It has a typically late-19th century Afghan-style leather cover embossed with ...
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New York Police Parade, June 1st, 1899
The film shows members of "New York's Finest" parading at a crowded Union Square. Seen are members of the Bicycle Squad, mounted horses, and two regimental marching bands. At the time of filming, the New York City Police Department was still recovering from the corruption scandals of the early 1890's that had severely tarnished the reputation of the department. A State-Senate-appointed group known as the Lexow Committee investigated the department and issued a scathing report that detailed serious criminal activity within the department. In 1895, public opinion was ...
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Report Map on the Hydrogeographic Work of Expeditions to the Eastern Ocean and by Squadron Ships in the Eastern Ocean for 1898 and Preceeding Years
Hydrographic maps mainly serve the needs of navigators and mariners. Other uses include fishing, oceanography, and underwater prospecting. Hydrographic mapping was highly developed in 19th-century Russia, where it was carried out by the Ministry of Marine to create and constantly update navigational charts. This map is from a larger work entitled Sobranie otchetnykh kart gidrograficheskikh rabot (Collection of Report Maps of Hydrogeographic Work and Maps Indicating Shipwrecks for 1898 in the Black Sea, Sea of Azov, Caspian Sea, White Sea, Baltic Sea, and Parts of the Eastern Ocean and ...
Funafuti; Or Three Months on a Coral Island: An Unscientific Account of a Scientific Expedition
Funafuti is a coral atoll that is part of Tuvalu, a sovereign nation located in the west-central Pacific Ocean, midway between Hawaii and Australia. This book is an account of a scientific expedition in 1897 to Funafuti, which at the time was part of the British protectorate of the Gilbert and Ellice Islands. The author, Janet William Edgeworth David, the wife of Professor T. W. E. David of Sydney University in Australia, accompanied her husband on the expedition. The object of the expedition was to take deep borings of coral ...
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Mosque of Abderrahman, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print is from “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” in the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It depicts the Sidi Abderrahman [Abdul Rahman, Abdel Rahman, Abdurrahman] Mosque in Algiers, Algeria, circa 1899. According to Cook’s Practical Guide to Algiers, Algeria, and Tunisia (1904), “With the exception of the Djama el Kebir…this is the oldest religious building in Algiers…. The marabout [popular saint] Abd er Rahman et Thalebi was born in 1387 and died in 1471. The mosque was built between these dates and contains ...
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Cathedral, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print is from “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” in the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It depicts the Cathedral of St. Philippe in Algiers, originally the Ketchaoua mosque, which had been converted to a Christian place of worship under the French occupation. The structure was rededicated as a mosque following Algeria’s independence in 1962. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H ...
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The Harbor and Admiralty, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print is from “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” in the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It depicts Algiers's harbor, which had been redesigned and greatly expanded by the French in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H. Husher. They obtained the exclusive rights to use the Swiss "Photochrom" process for converting black-and-white photographs into ...
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Babel-Oued from Casbah, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print is from “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” in the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It depicts Babel-Oued (Bab El Oued), a neighborhood of Algiers, as seen from the fortified citadel, or Casbah. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H. Husher. They obtained the exclusive rights to use the Swiss "Photochrom" process for converting black-and-white photographs into color images and printing them ...
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Harbor by Moonlight, II, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. Dating from 1899, it depicts a section of the harbor of Algiers. The harbor was first constructed in 1518 under the reign of the Turkish admiral, Khair-ed-in. For hundreds of years, Algerian pirates maintained and secured the harbor against the naval powers of Europe. When the French occupied Algeria in the 1830s, they made the harbor a center of commerce and naval power, and greatly expanded the port, which ...
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Government Place, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the 1905 catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It depicts Government Place in Algiers around 1899. This square was considered the heart of the city. According to Baedeker’s The Mediterranean: Handbook for Travelers (1911), it was “the noisiest place in the town, crowded with natives at all hours.” The white building is the Djemâa el-Djedid mosque, which Baedeker described as "curiously incongruous" for its mix of Byzantine, Italian, Andalusian, and Turkish architectural styles. Other buildings ...
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Interior of Notre Dame d'Afrique, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print is from “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” in the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It depicts the Cathedral of Notre Dame d’Afrique, which was established in 1872 under Cardinal Charles Lavigerie (the initiator of the Missionary Order of Our Lady of Africa, or “White Fathers”) and designed by the French architect Fromageau. Baedeker’s 1911 The Mediterranean described the cathedral as “a pilgrimage-church for sick persons and mariners…. From the terrace in front of the church, where the blessing of the sea by ...
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Museum: Entrance Hall, I, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print is from “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” in the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It depicts the entrance hall and courtyard of a museum in Algiers--most likely the Musée National des Antiquités Algeriennes, opened in 1897, and described by Baedeker’s The Mediterranean (1911) as “containing the finest collection of the kind in Algeria.” The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H ...
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Place de la Republique, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print is from “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” in the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It depicts the Place de la république (Republic plaza) in the capital city of Algiers, circa 1899. Baedeker’s 1911 The Mediterranean spoke admiringly of “the spacious Place de la République, with the gardens of Square Bresson, adorned with bamboos and magnolias, the Théâtre Municipal, and the most showy cafés.” The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher ...
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Great Mosque in the Marine Street, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print is from “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” in the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It depicts the Great Mosque (al-Djemaa al-Kabir), which Baedeker’s The Mediterranean described in 1911 as “the oldest and largest mosque in the town, founded in 1018 for believers in the Malekite ritual…. Both the mosque and its minaret, originally built by the Abdel-wadite Abû Tâkhfîn in 1322-3, have now been modernized. The entrance is by a portico in the Rue de la Marine, erected in 1837.” The Detroit Photographic ...
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Cathedral, Carthage, Tunisia
This photochrome print of the Cathedral of Saint Louis, in Carthage, is part of “Views of Architecture and People in Tunisia” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. The cathedral was built in 1884-90 and named after Louis IX, a French king who died in the siege of Tunis in 1270. At the time of construction, Tunisia was a French protectorate. The church was built on Byrsa Hill, the castle hill of the ancient city of Carthage. Under a 1964 agreement between the Vatican and the Republic of Tunisia ...
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Private Drawing Room, I, Kasr-el-Said, Tunisia
This photochrome print is part of “Views of Architecture and People in Tunisia” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It shows a private drawing room in the Kassar-Said Palace in Tunis. Baedeker’s The Mediterranean: Handbook for Travelers (1911) described the palace as “a château of the bey” to which admittance by tourists was not allowed. “Here, in 1881, was concluded the Bardo Treaty, which ended the independence of Tunisia.” Tunisia came under the control of the Ottoman Empire in 1574. Bey was originally the title of the ...
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Bedchamber of the Late Bey of Tunis, Kasr-el-Said, Tunisia
This photochrome print, from circa 1899, is part of “Views of Architecture and People in Tunisia” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It shows the chamber of the bey of Tunis in the Kassar-Said Palace in Tunis. Baedeker’s The Mediterranean: Handbook for Travelers (1911) described the palace as “a château of the bey” to which admittance by tourists was not allowed. Muhammad III as-Sadiq (1813–82) ruled Tunisia from September 1859 until his death in October 1882. He was succeeded by Ali Muddat ibn al-Husayn (1817–1902 ...
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Sousse, Tunisia
This photochrome print from around 1899 is from “Views of Architecture and People in Tunisia” in the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It depicts the seaside town of Sousse, Tunisia, which, according to Baedeker’s The Mediterranean: Handbook for Travelers (1911), followed Tunis and Sfax as the third most important seaport in Tunisia. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H. Husher. They obtained the exclusive rights ...
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General View from Paris Hotel, Tunis, Tunisia
This photochrome print from around 1899 is from “Views of Architecture and People in Tunisia” in the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It depicts the rooftops of the city of Tunis as seen from the Paris Hotel. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H. Husher. They obtained the exclusive rights to use the Swiss "Photochrom" process for converting black-and-white photographs into color images and printing them ...
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Mosque of St. Catherine, Tunis, Tunisia
This photochrome print from around 1899 is from “Views of Architecture and People in Tunisia” in the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It depicts the Mosque of Youssef Sahib at-Taba'a (sometimes called the Halfouine Mosque), in Place Halfouine, Tunis. Construction of the mosque began in 1812 but was not completed until 1970. It is described by Baedeker’s The Mediterranean: Handbook for Travelers (1911) as being “founded on blocks of stone from Carthage.” The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s ...
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Souc-el-Trouk, Tunis, Tunisia
This photochrome print from around 1899 is from “Views of Architecture and People in Tunisia” in the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It depicts the Souc-el-Trouk, or bazaar, in the city of Tunis. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H. Husher. They obtained the exclusive rights to use the Swiss "Photochrom" process for converting black-and-white photographs into color images and printing them by photolithography. This process ...
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Sadiky Hospital, Tunis, Tunisia
This photochrome print from around 1899 is from “Views of Architecture and People in Tunisia” in the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It depicts the Sadiky Hospital in the city of Tunis. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H. Husher. They obtained the exclusive rights to use the Swiss "Photochrom" process for converting black-and-white photographs into color images and printing them by photolithography. This process permitted ...
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Bardo, Tribunal Chamber, Tunis, Tunisia
This photochrome print of the tribunal chamber in the Bardo Palace in Tunis is part of “Views of Architecture and People in Tunisia” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. Baedeker’s The Mediterranean: Handbook for Travellers (1911) informed its readers that the Bardo, located in the fertile plain to the west of Tunis, was a 13th- century palace that was “the former winter-residence of the beys.” It once “formed a little town by itself” and housed “a treasury, a mosque, baths, barracks, and a prison.” This photo shows ...
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Procession, Kairwan, Tunisia
This photochrome print of a procession in Kairwan, Tunisia, is part of “Views of Architecture and People in Tunisia” in the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. Kairwan was once the political and religious center of Tunisia and was considered the country's holiest city. In his 1908 book Tunis, Kairouan & Carthage: Described and Illustrated by Forty-Eight Paintings, the British artist and author Graham Petrie (1859–1940) declared that "it is the absolute duty of every visitor to Tunis to make a pilgrimage to the holy city of Kairouan," which ...
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The Colony of Eritrea from its Origins until March 1, 1899
Italy, which achieved its national unity in 1859–60, was a relative latecomer to the scramble among the European powers for colonies in Africa. Italian ambitions initially settled upon a region along the Red Sea coast once occupied by the Ottoman Turks and subsequently claimed by both Egypt and Ethiopia. Between 1869 and 1880 the Rubattino Navigation Company purchased tracts of land along the Red Sea coast from the local sultan. These acquisitions were transferred to the Italian state in 1882, and in 1885 Italian troops landed at Massawa, Aseb ...
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The Victoria Nyanza. The Land, the Races and their Customs, with Specimens of Some of the Dialects
Lake Victoria (in the Bantu language, Victoria Nyanza), is the largest lake in Africa and the second largest body of fresh water in the world, surpassed only by Lake Superior in North America. The lake is crossed by the equator, and is the chief source of the Nile River. The first European to reach the lake was the British explorer John Hanning Speke in 1858, who named it after Britain’s Queen Victoria. In 1890, at the height of the European scramble for colonies in Africa, Britain and Germany divided ...
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Immigration Handbook for Scandinavian Settlers in Canada, with Comprehensive Descriptions of Manitoba, the Northwest Territories and British Columbia
This immigration handbook was published by the Canadian Department of Interior in 1889 for the express purpose of recruiting settlers from Sweden. It includes an introduction to Canada and Canadian society, an immigration procedures handbook, and a topographical description of Manitoba, the Northwest Territories, and British Columbia. Special attention is paid to already-existing Scandinavian settlements.
The Gentleman Digger: Being Studies and Pictures of Life in Johannesburg
The Gentleman Digger is a fictional work set in Johannesburg, South Africa, in 1889. Following the discovery of gold in the 1880s, Johannesburg became a boomtown that attracted miners and prospectors from all over the world. The book depicts the rapid growth of the city and the squalor, glitter, drunkenness, and crime that characterized the early mining camps. The book’s author, the Comtesse de Brémont (1864–1922), was born Anna Dunphy to Irish parents in Cincinnati, Ohio. At the age of 17, she married the Comte de Brémont, a ...
Togo under the German Flag
Germany, a latecomer to the competition among the European powers for colonies in Africa, established the Togoland Protectorate in 1884. Encompassing the territory of present-day Togo and the Volta Region District of Ghana in western Africa, Togo was portrayed by German imperial circles as a model colony, financially self-sufficient and benefiting from bridges, roads, and railroads built to support an agricultural industry based on cacao, coffee, and cotton exports. Later historians disputed this characterization, noting the often harsh treatment of the Togolese under German rule. The German authorities used scientific ...
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General View from Mustapha, I, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of Algiers, taken from the neighborhood of Mustapha, is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Mustapha, at the southern end of the city, was described in the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers as “the industrial quarters of Algiers.” However, as this image shows, Mustapha Supérieur also had fine hotels and villas set in beautiful gardens. The photograph depicts the harbor with a splendid view of the ...
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General View from Mustapha, II, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of Algiers, taken from the neighborhood of Mustapha, is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Mustapha, at the southern end of the city and at that time sometimes considered a separate entity, was described in the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers as “the industrial quarters of Algiers.” The photograph depicts the harbor with a splendid view of the bay as well as of the Champ de ...
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From the Admiralty, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the harbor in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). According to the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers, “the sole Harbour, prior to the French period, was the Ancien Port, or Darse de l’Amirauté, constructed by Kheireddin Barbarossa.” Barbarossa (circa 1478–1546) was a Greco-Turkish pirate, Ottoman admiral, and pasha of Algiers. The French expanded the port at great cost in the mid-19th ...
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The Harbor from the Lighthouse, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the harbor in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). According to the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers, “the sole Harbour, prior to the French period, was the Ancien Port, or Darse de l’Amirauté, constructed by Kheireddin Barbarossa.” Barbarossa (circa 1478–1546) was a Greco-Turkish pirate, Ottoman admiral, and pasha of Algiers. The French expanded the port at great cost in the mid-19th ...
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Harbor by Moonlight, I, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the harbor in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). According to the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers, “the sole Harbour, prior to the French period, was the Ancien Port, or Darse de l’Amirauté, constructed by Kheireddin Barbarossa.” Barbarossa (circa 1478–1546) was a Greco-Turkish pirate, Ottoman admiral, and pasha of Algiers. The French expanded the port at great cost in the mid-19th ...
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Moonlight View, with Lighthouse, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the harbor in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Also seen in the image is one of the harbor’s lighthouses, built in 1544, on the site of an old Spanish castle and the fort of Peñón. According to the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers, “the sole Harbour, prior to the French period, was the Ancien Port, or Darse de l’Amirauté, constructed ...
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The Admiralty, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the admiralty in the port of Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The original Spanish port was destroyed and rebuilt by Kheireddin Barbarossa (circa 1478–1546), a Greco-Turkish pirate, Ottoman admiral, and pasha of Algiers. The French greatly expanded the port and occupied the neo-Moorish Palais de l’Amirauté (Admiralty Palace). As described by the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers, “one could traverse ...
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The Cemetery, with Chapel, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of a cemetery in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers described several cemeteries in the city. The Cimetière Musulman de Belcourt was “the finest Mohammedan burial-ground in Algiers, containing a number of handsome monuments and the picturesque Kubba [tomb] of Sidi Abderrahman Bu-Kobrin (died 1793), a famous Algerian saint, a native of Great Kabylia.” On the sides of ...
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The Cemetery, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of a cemetery in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers described several cemeteries in the city. The Cimetière Musulman de Belcourt was “the finest Mohammedan burial-ground in Algiers, containing a number of handsome monuments and the picturesque Kubba [tomb] of Sidi Abderrahman Bu-Kobrin (died 1793), a famous Algerian saint, a native of Great Kabylia.” On the sides of ...
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Part of the Cemetery, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of a cemetery in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers described several cemeteries in the city. The Cimetière Musulman de Belcourt was “the finest Mohammedan burial-ground in Algiers, containing a number of handsome monuments and the picturesque Kubba [tomb] of Sidi Abderrahman Bu-Kobrin (d. 1793), a famous Algerian saint, a native of Great Kabylia.” On the sides of ...
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Fountain in Mosque of El Kebir, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the Great Mosque in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). Al-Djamaa el-Kabir (the Great Mosque) was first built in about 1097 and, although subsequently much modified, is regarded as a rare architectural survival of the Almoravid period in North Africa. Abu Takhfin added the minaret in 1322–24; the French added the gallery on the outside of the building in 1837–40 when they rebuilt the street. According to the 1911 edition ...
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Museum: Entrance Hall, II, Algiers, Algeria
This photochrome print of the Musée National des Antiquités Algériennes in Algiers is part of “Views of People and Sites in Algeria” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company (1905). The museum, which opened in 1897, was described in the 1911 edition of Baedeker’s The Mediterranean, seaports and sea routes: Handbook for Travellers as containing “the finest collection of the kind in Algeria.” The print depicts the museum’s entrance hall, holding part of the collection of ancient columns and sculpture. The hall shows the fine decorative architectural ...
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