6 results
Titusville, Pennsylvania, 1896
This panoramic map shows Titusville, Pennsylvania, as it appeared in 1896. Located in western Pennsylvania, Titusville is known as the place where the modern oil industry began. In 1859, the recently formed Seneca Oil Company hired retired railroad conductor Edwin L. Drake to investigate suspected oil deposits near Titusville. Drake used an old steam engine to drill a well that began the first large-scale commercial extraction of petroleum. By the early 1860s, western Pennsylvania had been transformed by the oil boom. The numbered index at the bottom of the map ...
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Library of Congress
Timbuctoo the Mysterious
This book is an English translation of Tombouctou la mystérieuse, published in Paris in 1897. The author, Felix Dubois (1862–1945), was a French journalist who in 1895 traveled from Paris to Dakar, Senegal, and from there down the River Niger in what was then called French Sudan. He visited the town of Jenne, which he called the “jewel of the valley of the Niger” and from there proceeded to the ancient city of Timbuktu. Citing an old Sudanese chronicle that called Timbuktu “the meeting-place of all who travel by ...
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Library of Congress
Tourist's House, Spitzbergen, Norway
This photochrome print is part of “Landscape and Marine Views of Norway” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. The photo depicts a tourist house on Spitsbergen Island, part of the Svalvard Archipelago, located within the Arctic Circle, some 550 kilometers north of the Norwegian mainland. There were no tourist accommodations on Spitsbergen until around 1896, when the Vesteraalens Steamship Company constructed a tourist house along the coast of Advent Bay to accommodate an influx of visitors. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in ...
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Library of Congress
After Great Hurricane of 1896
This image shows the devastation caused by the Great Hurricane of 1896 that struck the Gulf and Atlantic coasts of Florida. With its 2,200-kilometer coastline, Florida is the U.S. state most vulnerable to these storms. More than 450 recorded tropical storms and hurricanes have reached its shores since European exploration began. The hurricane of September 1896 destroyed most of the residential area of the town of Cedar Key on the upper west coast of the Florida peninsula, killing dozens of residents and destroying most of Cedar Key’s ...
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State Library and Archives of Florida
Map of the Belgian Congo
Little is known about the actual cartographer and engraver of this map, Léon de Moor. More is known about the publishing house, J. Lebègue and Co. The firm published many geographical documents, including maps and travel accounts. In 1896, when this map was published, the Belgian Congo–known as the Congo Free State–was actually a personal possession of King Leopold II and not an official Belgian colony. The king was engaged in a vigorous publicity campaign aimed at convincing the other European powers to recognize the legitimacy of his ...
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Library of Congress
Map Showing the Colony of Eritrea and the Adjacent Regions, Scale of 1:250,000
Italy, a relative latecomer to the scramble by the European powers for African colonies, took control of coastal areas of present-day Eritrea in 1885. The Treaty of Wichale (Uccialli) of 1889, concluded with Emperor Menelik of Ethiopia, gave Italy sovereignty over the territory that the Italians called Eritrea, a name derived from Mare Erythraeum, the Roman designation for the Red Sea. The Italian government tasked the Florence-based Institute for Military Geography to produce detailed and precise topographical maps of the new colony. The institute published this map in 1896. The ...
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Library of Congress