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223 results
Great Trading Routes of the Sahara
This 1889 map of trans-Saharan trading routes by French explorer Edouard Blanc reflects the growing priority that Europeans gave to land-based trade during the late 19th-century imperial “scramble for Africa.” In articles about his work, Blanc stressed the importance of identifying “natural” geographic routes that would connect French colonial possessions in west Africa, such as Senegal, to Algeria in north Africa, and link the Mediterranean coast to Sudan and central Africa. Blanc based his maps not only on his own travels but also on nearly a century of reports from ...
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Library of Congress
Guide to Kiev and Its Environs, Including an Address Section, Map and Phototype Views of Kiev
This 1890 guidebook provides comprehensive information for visitors to Kiev. It includes a history of the city and details of places of interest, such as Kiev-Pechersk Lavra, the cathedrals and other churches, historical monuments, public gardens and wooded areas, public and administrative buildings, and bridges over the Dnieper River. Included is useful information for travelers, such as timetables for trains, steamships, and other passenger transport and a directory for hotels, restaurants, doctors, banks, stores, baths, libraries, clubs, and city and church authorities. The guide anticipates by 24 years Baedeker’s ...
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National Parliamentary Library of Ukraine
Memoirs of Babur
This book is a lithograph edition of the Persian translation of Bāburnāmah (Memoirs of Babur), the autobiography of Ẓahīr al-Dīn Muḥammad Bāburshāh (1483–1530), the first Mughal emperor of India. Bāburnāmah originally was written in Chagatai Turkish and was translated into Persian during the reign of the Mughal emperor Akbar. The translation was undertaken by Bairam Khan (died 1561), an Afghan bureaucrat and military commander who served under Emperor Humayun and who was briefly appointed regent over his successor, Emperor Akbar, when Akbar was a child. This book was printed ...
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Library of Congress
Costa Rica
This map of Costa Rica was published by the International Bureau of the American Republics (instituted in 1910 as the Pan American Union), an agency established in 1890 in Washington D.C., by resolution of the International Conference of American States. The bureau published handbooks, maps, and a monthly bulletin for disseminating information relating to the promotion of trade among the countries of the Americas. The map shows the routes of steamship lines from the ports of Limon, Puntarenas, and San Juan del Sur (Nicaragua); undersea telegraph cables; railroads; and ...
Contributed by
Columbus Memorial Library, Organization of American States
Ciniselli Circus Water Pantomime
This poster by an unknown artist is devoted to the Ciniselli Circus water pantomime (probably The Four Elements). Produced in Berlin by the firm Dinse & Eckert, the picture is a colored lithograph with the letters written in gold. The water pantomime was performed for the first time in Russia in 1892. In The Four Elements, water rushed down in a cascade and fountains gushed out in different places of the arena. Deer, elephants, and horses with riders swam in the arena lake. Pantomime, an art form in which the story ...
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The Bolshoi St. Petersburg State Circus - Museum of Circus Art
Comprehensive Map of Vietnam’s Provinces
This undated brush and ink manuscript map of Vietnam during the 19th century combines features of the traditional cartography practiced in both China and Vietnam with some Western elements. The place names and a text block in the lower right-hand corner are in classical Chinese calligraphy, the writing system used by both Chinese and Vietnamese scholar-officials. Traditional elements include its pictorial style (mountains, trees, and structures such as the border gate between Vietnam and China), lack of precise scale, and emphasis on mountains and water. A large number of mountains ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Members of Gaucho Tribe, Argentina
This photograph of gauchos at work in Argentina is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and film ...
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Library of Congress
Immigrants Being Transported on Horse-Drawn Wagon, Buenos Aires, Argentina
This photograph of newly arrived immigrants in Buenos Aires, Argentina is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass ...
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Library of Congress
Busload of Immigrants, Buenos Aires, Argentina
This photograph of immigrants in Buenos Aires, Argentina is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and film ...
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Library of Congress
The Entrance to the Temple of Jupiter
This photograph depicting the ruins of the entrance to the Temple of Jupiter in Baalbek, Lebanon, is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16 ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Barbados, Native Huts
This photograph is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and film negatives. The easternmost island in the ...
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Library of Congress
Fredericksborg Castle, Copenhagen, Denmark
This photochrome print is from the “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Copenhagen, Denmark” section in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It shows Fredericksborg Castle as it appeared in the last decade of the 19th century. The 1892 edition of Baedeker’s Norway, Sweden, and Denmark: Handbook for Travellers offered the following information about the castle: “This palace was erected in 1602-20 by Christian IV in a plain and vigorous Renaissance style, on the site of an older building of Frederick II. The massive edifice, which consists ...
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Library of Congress
Royal Theater, Copenhagen, Denmark
This photochrome print is from the “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Copenhagen, Denmark” section in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It shows the Royal, or National Theater, which is identified in the 1892 edition of Baedeker’s Norway, Sweden, and Denmark: Handbook for Travellers as “a handsome Renaissance structure by Petersen and Dahlerup, built in 1872-74.” To the right and left of the entrance are bronze statues of the Danish poets Ludvig Holberg (1684-1754) and Adam Oehlenschläger (1779-1850). The theater is located on Kongens Nytorv (King ...
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Library of Congress
Saviour Church, Copenhagen, Denmark
This photochrome print from circa 1890-1900 is from the “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Copenhagen, Denmark” section in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It shows Our Savior’s Church (Vor Frelsers Kirke), a large baroque church in the Christianshavn district of the city, that was built in 1682-96. The church was constructed in a Palladian-Netherlandic style for King Christian V by the court builder, Lambert van Haven (1630-95). Lauritz de Thurah (1706-59) designed the spire, which was completed in 1752, more than 50 years after the ...
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Library of Congress
Klampenborg Hermitage, with View of Park, Copenhagen, Denmark
This photochrome from circa 1890-1900 is from the “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Copenhagen, Denmark” section in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It shows the Eremitage Hunting Lodge in the Jaegersborg Deer Park near Klampenborg, Denmark, which was built in 1734-36 by King Christian VI for royal hunting dinners. The deer park was established in 1669 by King Frederik III as a private hunting reserve, and was opened to the public in 1756. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the ...
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Library of Congress
The Tivoli Park Entrance, Copenhagen, Denmark
This photochrome from circa 1890-1900 is from the “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Copenhagen, Denmark” section in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It shows the entrance to Tivoli Gardens, which opened in 1843, and is the second-oldest amusement park in the world (after Dyrehavsbakken, also in Denmark). The park was inspired by the romantic pleasure gardens of Europe, which were landscaped according to the naturalistic English tradition rather than the French style based on geometric lines. Tivoli's founder, Georg Carstensen (1812-57), had seen pleasure gardens ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Helsingborg, Sweden
This photochrome print is from the “Views of Architecture and Other Sites in Copenhagen, Denmark” section of the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts a ship entering the harbor at Helsingborg, Sweden, which, between 1874 and 1896, was connected to Copenhagen by regular ferry service. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H. Husher. They obtained the exclusive rights to use the Swiss "Photochrom" process for ...
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Library of Congress
University, Belgrade, Servia
This photochrome print of Kapetan Misino zdanje (Captain Misa's building) in Belgrade, Serbia, is part of “Views of Belgrade, Serbia” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. Built between 1858 and 1863, the structure was designed by Czech architect Jan Nevole (1812-1903). It was intended to be the residence of the wealthy merchant and proponent of education, Captain Misa Anastasijevic, who donated it to the city on the condition that it be used for educational and cultural pursuits. The building, with its many domes and portals, recalls the ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Landing Place and Cathedral, Belgrade, Servia
This photochrome print of Belgrade as seen from the neighborhood of Kalemegdan is part of “Views of Belgrade, Serbia” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. At the top of the hill is the Saborna Crkva (Cathedral church), the great Serbian Orthodox cathedral dedicated to St. Michael, built by Prince Miloš Obrenović in 1837-40. The waterway is the Sava River, which flows into the Danube River. The “landing space,” or the port of Sava, played a role in Belgrade's history since the Roman occupation in the 3rd century ...
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Library of Congress
From the West, Cetinje, Montenegro
This late-19th century photochrome print is from “Views of Montenegro” in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts the town of Cetinje, the capital of Montenegro, an independent principality that separated from the Ottoman Empire in 1878. According to Baedeker’s Austria, Including Hungary, Transylvania, Dalmatia, and Bosnia (1900), Cetinje had 3,000 inhabitants at the time. “In some respects the place resembles a little German country town, but it has several distinctive features of its own. It may be seen in an hour, but a whole day ...
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Library of Congress
The Convent, Cetinje, Montenegro
This late 19th-century photochrome print is part of “Views of Montenegro” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts the Cetinje Monastery at the foot of Mount Lovćen in Cetinje. The monastery was built in 1701 by Bishop–Prince Danilo (1670–1735), the founder of the Petrović Njegoš dynasty, following the destruction by Venetian forces of the medieval Cetinje Monastery, a Serb Orthodox monastery built by Ivan the Black in 1484. The monastery has great historical significance for the Montenegrin people. It contains the remains of Saint Peter ...
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Library of Congress