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13 results
Map of the Brazilian Empire
This detailed map of Imperial Brazil was drawn by Conrado Jacob Niemeyer (1788-1862) after an earlier map by Duarte da Ponte Ribeiro, the Baron of Ponte Ribeiro (1795-1878). After beginning his career as a doctor, Ponte Ribeiro became an important diplomat during the early years of Brazilian independence, representing his country in Portugal, Mexico, Peru, Bolivia, and Argentina. Niemeyer was an engineer best known for constructing, at his own expense, a major road connecting the different districts of Rio de Janeiro; this road now bears his name.
Contributed by
National Library of Brazil
Pinkas of the Talmud Torah Religious School from Kopychintsy
This pinkas (record book) of the Talmud Torah religious school from the town of Kopychintsy in eastern Galicia, Ukraine, reflects the activity of a religious school in the late 19th century. It consists of the traditional components of such works: the title page, the second title, blessings, the statutes, a list of members of society, and the diaries of the activities of the Talmud Torah school. All pages of the pinkas are richly decorated in the traditional manner of this type of Jewish document. The title pages are designed as ...
Contributed by
V.I. Vernadsky National Library of Ukraine
Maps of the Japanese Coastal Areas (Ino Maps)
Inō Tadataka (1745−1818) was a famous Japanese surveyor and cartographer during the Edo period. He is known for completing the first map of Japan based on actual measurements, which he himself made by traveling throughout the country over a period of many years. Dainihon enkai yochi zenzu (Maps of the Japanese coastal areas) was compiled as a final version of Tadataka’s many maps and was presented to the shogunate in 1821. The work, which covers almost the entire country, is composed of three sets of maps of different ...
Contributed by
National Diet Library
The Hidden Treasure on Arts and Crafts
Kitāb al-durr al-maknūn fī al-ṣanā’i‘ wa al-funūn (The hidden treasure on arts and crafts) is a compendium of several crafts and artisanal techniques by 19th century Lebanese author Jirjīs Ṭannūs ʻAwn. The book has nine chapters on different crafts: electroplating; the dyeing of fabric; photography; candle-making; and the manufacture of ink, glue, mirrors, ceramics, and soap. A tenth chapter discusses chemical compounds. Most of the book is devoted to three crafts: electroplating, including plating and galvanizing techniques involving copper, brass, gold, and silver; the dyeing of fabric, including natural ...
Contributed by
Qatar National Library
The Book of Sublime Marvels of the History of Constantinople
Kitab al-Tuhfah al-Saniyah fi-Tarikh al-Qustantiniyah (The book of sublime marvels of the history of Constantinople) is a historical miscellany, which opens with a brief history of the city of Constantinople from earliest times to the author’s own day. It includes descriptions of noteworthy features, such as impressive buildings, gardens, cemeteries, bazaars, and opulent residential quarters. This portion of the work might be considered a guidebook for Arab visitors. The author expresses his admiration for the city and praise of the sultan in a way that seems aimed at binding ...
Contributed by
Qatar National Library
Malay Annals
Sometime around the year 1400, a prince from Sumatra named Parameswara founded a settlement at the mouth of the Melaka River on the west coast of the Malay Peninsula. One of his successors embraced Islam, and Melaka soon grew to become the greatest Islamic kingdom in Southeast Asia. A center of the spice trade that was known as the “Venice of the East,” it attracted merchants from as far away as Arabia, India, China, and Japan. The wealth of Melaka proved irresistible to the Portuguese, who were the first Europeans ...
Contributed by
The British Library
Studio Portrait of Models Wearing Traditional Clothing from the Province of Selanik (Salonica), Ottoman Empire
Pascal Sébah was a prolific and well-known Ottoman photographer who worked for both Ottoman and Western clients. Sébah’s studio produced a number of collections of ethnographic and costume photos, some in collaborations with the painter and archaeologist Osman Hamdi Bey. This photomechanical print is drawn from one such collaboration, a book entitled Les costumes populaires de la Turquie en 1873 (Folk [or Traditional] costumes of Turkey in 1873). This album depicting ethnic costumes from throughout the Ottoman Empire was commissioned by the Ottoman government for the 1873 International Fair ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Illustrations of China and Its People: A Series of Two Hundred Photographs, with Letterpress Descriptive of the Places and People Represented
John Thomson (1837-1921) was the first known photographer to document the people and landscape of China for publication and dissemination to the Western world. Between 1868 and 1872, he traveled over 6,500 kilometers with his camera, equipment, and darkroom, capturing all aspects of Chinese life. The photographs in these four volumes show the many sides of China: sweeping landscapes, royalty and ruling classes, merchants and economic activity, everyday life, and the faces of men, women, and children. Thomson was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, the son of a tobacco spinner ...
Contributed by
Yale University Library
Studio Portrait of Models Wearing Traditional Clothing from the Province of Iles d'Archipel (Islands of the Archipelago), Ottoman Empire
Pascal Sébah was a prolific and well-known Ottoman photographer who worked for both Ottoman and western clients. Sébah’s studio produced a number of collections of ethnographic and costume photos, some in important collaborations with the painter and archaeologist Osman Hamdi Bey. This photomechanical print is drawn from one such collaboration, a book entitled Les costumes populaires de la Turquie en 1873 (Popular costumes of Turkey in 1873). This album depicting ethnic costumes from throughout the Ottoman Empire was commissioned by the Ottoman government for the 1873 International Fair in ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Santo Domingo, Past and Present, with a Glance at Hayti
Hispaniola was visited and named by Christopher Columbus during his first voyage in 1492. The present-day division of the island into two countries – French- and Creole-speaking Haiti and the Spanish-speaking Dominican Republic – can be traced to the 1697 Treaty of Ryswick, in which Spain recognized French sovereignty over the western third of the island. In 1869, the ruler of the Dominican Republic, by then an independent country, sought to join the United States as a way of dealing with bankruptcy and internal unrest. Secretary of State William H. Seward was ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Ito Hirobumi's Handwritten Diary of His Foreign Journey
In December 1871 (lunar November, Meiji 4), the Iwakura mission departed Japan, led by Iwakura Tomomi serving as ambassador plenipotentiary, and including Kido Takayoshi, Ōkubo Toshimichi, and Itō Hirobumi as deputy ambassadors. The mission lasted approximately two years, and its members made a circuit of the United States, Britain, France, Russia, and other European countries. One of its purposes was to promote international recognition of the Meiji Restoration, which returned Japan to imperial government in 1868 after the Tokugawa shogunate. The others were investigation of the institutions and cultures of ...
Contributed by
National Diet Library
Cuba Shall Be Free
This chromolithograph is an allegorical composition. It shows a Cuban soldier holding the national flag on the left, the winged figure of Victory at the right, a coat of arms at lower center with cannonballs and military band instruments, and ships in the background. The title reads Cuba Sera Libre (Cuba shall be free), with the dates October 31 to November 4, 1873 indicated on the banner at the bottom. The title and the dates refer to the Virginius Incident, in which the Virginius, a blockade runner previously employed in ...
Contributed by
Brown University Library
Geognostic Map of the Localities of Irkutsk, Verkholensk, and Balagansk Districts
The first geological (geognostic) maps in Russia were produced in the 1850s. This map of the Irkutsk region was published by the Siberian Department of the Imperial Russian Geographic Society under the leadership of Academician F.B. Schmidt. It shows the location of mines and minerals, caves, gaps, salt deposits, springs, landslides, and patterns of freezing on Lake Baikal. The colors denote different types of rock.
Contributed by
Russian State Library