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Travels in South Africa in the Years 1849 to 1857
László Magyar (1814-64) was a Hungarian explorer who lived for 17 years in Angola and made important contributions to the study of the geography and ethnography of equatorial Africa. He was trained as a naval officer and served in the naval forces of Austria and Argentina. In 1846, he undertook his first expedition in Africa, a voyage up the Congo River. Magyar subsequently married a daughter of the King of Bihé and used his family connections to gain access to interior regions of the continent. Accompanied by a royal guard ...
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Library of Congress
László Magyar's Travels in Southern Africa Between 1849 and 1857
László Magyar (1814-64) was a Hungarian explorer who lived for 17 years in Angola and made important contributions to the study of the geography and ethnography of equatorial Africa. He was trained as a naval officer and served in the naval forces of Austria and Argentina. In 1846, he undertook his first expedition in Africa, a voyage up the Congo River. Magyar subsequently married a daughter of the King of Bihé and used his family connections to gain access to interior regions of the continent. Accompanied by a royal guard ...
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Library of Congress
Cool Evening at Shijogawara during the Gion Festival
This work depicting the Gion Festival in the mid-19th century is by Gountei Sadahide (circa 1807–78), also known as Utagawa Sadahide and Hashimoto Sadahide. The festival, one of the major summer events in Japan, dates back well over 1,000 years and is still held in Kyoto for the full month of July. Its purpose traditionally is to pray for the protection of the populace from disease during the hottest season of the year. Sadahide belonged to the Utagawa school and was a pupil of Kunisada, also known as ...
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National Diet Library
Map of the United States West of the Mississippi Showing the Routes to Pike's Peak, Overland Mail Route to California, and Pacific Railroad Surveys, 1859
D. McGowan and George H. Hildt’s 1859 map of the United States west of the Mississippi was based on an official map of 1857 produced by the Pacific railroad surveys. In the 1850s, Americans concluded that they needed to build a transcontinental railroad linking the east and center of the country with the Pacific coast. The U.S. Congress authorized the army topographical service to undertake engineering surveys and general assessments of five possible routes: from Saint Paul, Minnesota; from Council Bluffs, Iowa; from Saint Louis, Missouri; from Memphis ...
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Library of Congress