7 results in English
Travels in South Africa in the Years 1849 to 1857
László Magyar (1814-64) was a Hungarian explorer who lived for 17 years in Angola and made important contributions to the study of the geography and ethnography of equatorial Africa. He was trained as a naval officer and served in the naval forces of Austria and Argentina. In 1846, he undertook his first expedition in Africa, a voyage up the Congo River. Magyar subsequently married a daughter of the King of Bihé and used his family connections to gain access to interior regions of the continent. Accompanied by a royal guard ...
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László Magyar's Travels in Southern Africa Between 1849 and 1857
László Magyar (1814-64) was a Hungarian explorer who lived for 17 years in Angola and made important contributions to the study of the geography and ethnography of equatorial Africa. He was trained as a naval officer and served in the naval forces of Austria and Argentina. In 1846, he undertook his first expedition in Africa, a voyage up the Congo River. Magyar subsequently married a daughter of the King of Bihé and used his family connections to gain access to interior regions of the continent. Accompanied by a royal guard ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Cool Evening at Shijogawara during the Gion Festival
This work depicting the Gion Festival in the mid-19th century is by Gountei Sadahide (circa 1807–78), also known as Utagawa Sadahide and Hashimoto Sadahide. The festival, one of the major summer events in Japan, dates back well over 1,000 years and is still held in Kyoto for the full month of July. Its purpose traditionally is to pray for the protection of the populace from disease during the hottest season of the year. Sadahide belonged to the Utagawa school and was a pupil of Kunisada, also known as ...
Contributed by National Diet Library
Penn Steam Engine and Boiler Works. Foot of Palmer Street, Kensington, Philadelphia. Reaney, Neafie and Company Engineers, Machinists, Boiler Makers, Black Smiths and Founders
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows vessels docked in front of the engine and boiler works complex at the foot of Palmer Street on the busy Delaware River. Teams of several horses haul materials on trucks past the boiler works. Laborers work on the docks, piers, and boats at the complex. Docked vessels include the tugboats, steamboats, paddleboats, and a sailboat. The firm was established as Reaney, Neafie & Smith in ...
Cathedral of Saint Peter and Saint Paul, Philadelphia
This print from around 1859 is an exterior view of the Cathedral of Saint Peter and Saint Paul in Philadelphia. The Roman-Corinthian-style cathedral was built between 1846 and 1864 after the designs of Napoleon Le Brun (interior) and John Notman (exterior). Located on Eighteenth Street, north of Race Street, the church is modeled after the Lombard Church of Saint Charles (San Carlo al Corso) in Rome, Italy. Shown here is the Palladian facade of the building. Considered the greatest work by Notman, the facade features four massive stone Corinthian columns ...
Doctor Hoofland's Celebrated German Bitters and Balsamic Cordial. Prepared by Doctor C. M. Jackson, 418 Arch Street, Philadelphia
This colored advertising print from 1859 features an exterior view of the patent medicine shop operated by C.M. Jackson at 418 Arch Street in Philadelphia. The four-story building, adjacent to a walled courtyard, contains a date marker reading "1855"; lettering on the roof that spells out "C.M. Jackson"; and text on the side of the building that advertises "Dr. Hooflands German Bitters and Balsamic Cordial." Pedestrians walk and converse on the sidewalk and a horse-drawn carriage passes in the street. The illustration is surrounded by an arch-shaped decorative ...
Map of the United States West of the Mississippi Showing the Routes to Pike's Peak, Overland Mail Route to California, and Pacific Railroad Surveys, 1859
D. McGowan and George H. Hildt’s 1859 map of the United States west of the Mississippi was based on an official map of 1857 produced by the Pacific railroad surveys. In the 1850s, Americans concluded that they needed to build a transcontinental railroad linking the east and center of the country with the Pacific coast. The U.S. Congress authorized the army topographical service to undertake engineering surveys and general assessments of five possible routes: from Saint Paul, Minnesota; from Council Bluffs, Iowa; from Saint Louis, Missouri; from Memphis ...
Contributed by Library of Congress