11 results in English
Map of the Territory of the United States from the Mississippi to the Pacific Ocean
The United States gained vast territories in the West through the Mexican War of 1846−48 and the 1846 Oregon Treaty with Great Britain. By the early 1850s, government and commercial interests were debating the possibilities of building a transcontinental railroad to the Pacific. The Army Appropriations Act of 1853 provided for the completion of railroad surveys to determine possible routes. This map, issued in 1858 by Secretary of War Jefferson Davis, depicts the United States west of the Mississippi on the eve of the Civil War. California and Texas ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Asia: South Western Sheet
This map showing the Arabian Peninsula, Persia (present-day Iran), Afghanistan, and Baluchistan (present-day Iran and Pakistan) was copyrighted in 1858 by J.H. Colton & Company of New York. Coloring is used to indicate borders and certain provinces or settled areas. The map shows cities, mountains, and roads, and includes some notes on topographical features. The old Qatari city of al-Zabarah is shown. The map appeared in other editions of Colton’s General Atlas and reflects the general level of geographic knowledge of the Middle East in mid-19th-century America. J.H. Colton & Company was founded in New York City, most likely in 1831, by Joseph Hutchins Colton (1800–93), a Massachusetts native who had only a basic education and little or no formal training in geography or cartography. Colton built the firm into a major publisher of maps and atlases by purchasing the copyrights to other maps and republishing them before it began creating its own maps ...
Contributed by Qatar National Library
A Narrative of the Mission Sent by the Governor-General of India to the Court of Ava in 1855, with Notices of the Country, Government, and People
In December 1852, at the conclusion of the second Anglo-Burmese War, the British annexed the southern and coastal regions of Burma (known as Lower Burma). Pagan Min, and later his brother Mindon Min, continued to rule Upper Burma. In 1855, Arthur Phayre, the British commissioner for the annexed territories, visited the court of Ava in Upper Burma as part of an effort to improve relations with Mindon. Henry Yule was secretary to Phayre and accompanied him on the mission. This work, written by Yule, is a modified version of the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Pacho Ironworks, Province of Bogotá
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820–1902) shows the rural village of Pacho, in Bogotá Province (present-day Cundinamarca Department), Colombia, with the large ironworks in the foreground. The foundry, which was the first in Latin America, was established in 1814 to exploit the extensive iron deposits in the local mountains. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of Colombia and depicted the daily activities and traditional customs of the country’s different ethnic, racial, and social groups. Paz was born in ...
View of the City of Cipaquirá, Province of Bogotá
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820–1902) shows the city of Cipaquirá in the province of Bogotá (present-day Zipaquirá, Cundinamarca Department), Colombia. The caption on the painting indicates that this was where a rich mine of sal gema (halite) was found. The Cathedral of the Holy Trinity and Saint Anthony of Padua is prominent in the image. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of Colombia and depicted the daily activities and traditional customs of the country’s different ethnic, racial ...
Bridge of the Common over the Funza River or Bogotá River, Province of Bogotá
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820–1902) shows the Bridge of the Common over the Bogotá River in the province of Bogotá (present-day Cundinamarca Department), Colombia. The bridge over the Bogotá (previously called the Funza) was built by a Spanish engineer, Domingo Esquiaqui, and opened to traffic in 1796. The name of the bridge derives from its having been paid for by local landowners and others who benefited from its construction. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of Colombia and ...
View of the Department for White Children of the House of Refuge
This print depicts the buildings of the Department for White Children of the House of Refuge in Philadelphia, including the girls’ dormitories (first and second class), the girls’ work and sitting room, the officers’ rooms and main entrance, the boys’ dormitories, and the boys’ workshop. The lithograph is one of a pair of illustrations also printed on textile in 1858, as well as was used as the frontispiece to the Thirtieth Annual Report of the Board of Managers of the House of Refuge, the other being “View of the Department ...
View of the Department for Colored Children of the House of Refuge
This print depicts the buildings of the Department for Colored Children of the House of Refuge in Philadelphia, including the girls’ dormitories, the girls’ dining and sewing rooms, the supervisors’ rooms and the main entrance, the boys’ dormitories, and the boys’ school rooms. A tall brick wall surrounds the rear and sides of the complex of buildings and two men and a boy are seen talking in the foreground. The lithograph is also used as one of a pair of illustrations printed on textile in 1858, as well as the ...
The Little Canon
This book contains the Arabic text of Mahmud ibn Muhammad al-Jaghmini’s medical book, the Qānūncha, or Qānūnja. The title refers to Avicenna's seminal work on medicine, al-Qānūn (The canon). The suffix -cha is a diminutive in Persian, so the title of al-Jaghmini's work can be translated as the Little Canon or Mini-Canon. The name al-Jaghmini refers to the place of origin of the author in modern-day Uzbekistan (known during al-Jaghmini’s time as Khwarazm). The author of the Qānūncha has been occasionally identified with the 13th-century astronomer ...
Contributed by Qatar National Library
The Spears of the Party of the Merciful against the Throats of the Party of the Reviled
Timbuktu (present-day Tombouctou in Mali), founded around 1100 as a commercial center for trade across the Sahara Desert, was also an important seat of Islamic learning from the 14th century onward. The libraries there contain many important manuscripts, in different styles of Arabic scripts, which were written and copied by Timbuktu’s scribes and scholars. These works constitute the city’s most famous and long-lasting contribution to Islamic and world civilization. Sufis (mystics) form an important element in Islamic society, and al-Hājj 'Umar ibn Sa'id al-Futi‏ Tal (1797-1864) provides ...
The Rewards of the Enlightened for their Defense of the Status of God’s Chosen Saints
Timbuktu (present-day Tombouctou in Mali), founded around 1100 as a commercial center for trade across the Sahara Desert, was also an important seat of Islamic learning from the 14th century onward. The libraries there contain many important manuscripts, in different styles of Arabic scripts, which were written and copied by Timbuktu’s scribes and scholars. These works constitute the city’s most famous and long-lasting contribution to Islamic and world civilization. This text explains the basic principles of Sufism, pointing out the various stages of knowledge that Sufi mystics pass ...