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The Lincoln Bible
On March 4, 1861, Chief Justice Roger B. Taney administered the oath of office to Abraham Lincoln using a Bible provided by William Thomas Carroll, clerk of the Supreme Court, because Lincoln’s family Bible was packed with other belongings that still were en route to Washington from Springfield, Illinois. In the back of the velvet-covered Bible, along with the seal of the Supreme Court, the volume is annotated: "I, William Thos. Carroll, clerk of the said court do hereby certify that the preceding copy of the Holy Bible is ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Depictions of King Mindon’s Donations at Various Places from 1853 to 1857
This Burmese manuscript (Or 13681) from the British Library shows seven scenes of King Mindon’s donations at various places during the first four years of his reign (1853-57). The artist not only depicted the seven different historical merit-making ceremonies of King Mindon, but he also described the cost of the royal donations in detail. The mid-19th century parabaik (folding book) has red-tooled leather covers, the front cover bearing in gold letters the title “Depictions of King Mindon’s donations at various places beginning in the year 1215, first [volume ...
Contributed by
The British Library
Emigrant's Map and Guide for Routes to North America
This map by Gotthelf Zimmermann reflects the importance of German immigration to North America in the mid-19th century. When the Revolution of 1848 failed to produce desired reforms within the German confederation, droves of disillusioned Germans turned their sights abroad. Maps such as this helped show them the way. At the time, land in the United States was cheap, fertile, and plentiful, making it an ideal choice for immigrants eager to establish new settlements and to begin new lives. German communities in the United States became so prevalent that on ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Writing Manual
Sava Dobroplodni (1820–94) was a noted educator, dramatist, and literary figure during the era of the National Revival in Bulgaria. In his role as an educator, he wrote many textbooks, including this pismennik (writing manual). Published in 1853, Dobroplodni’s guide was one of the earliest Bulgarian manuals of writing, or orthography, as well as the first to provide definitions of such literary terms as metaphor, synonym, and allegory. The book showed the Slavic, Greek, German, and French alphabets, offered rules for writing, and gave examples of good writing ...
Contributed by
Central Library of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences
A Modern Version of the Tale of Genji in Snow Scenes
The term ukiyo-e, literally “pictures of the floating world,” refers to a genre of Japanese artwork that flourished in the Edo period (1600–1868). As the phrase “floating world” suggests, with its roots in the ephemeral worldview of Buddhism, ukiyo-e captured the fleeting dynamics of contemporary urban life. While being accessible and catering to “common” tastes, the artistic and technical details of these prints show remarkable sophistication, their subjects ranging from portraits of courtesans and actors to classical literature. This triptych is a joint work by Utagawa Kunisada (Toyokuni III ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
United States of North America: Perry Arrives in Uraga, Soshu Province
Commodore Matthew C. Perry (1794–1858) of the United States Navy entered the port of Yokohama in 1853 with an intimidating fleet of steam warships, in order to force Japan to open up after nearly two centuries of restricted foreign contact. The “black ships” that he came with became a common subject for popular prints. The Japanese people were increasingly exposed to Western culture as new trade agreements prompted cross-cultural interaction, and a mixture of curiosity, awe, and anxiety at the influx of unfamiliar technology and customs can be seen ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
The Pilgrimage of Alpha (Manuel Ancízar) in the Northern Provinces of New Granada, 1850–51
Peregrinación de Alpha (Manuel Ancízar) por las provincias del norte de la Nueva Granada, en 1850 i 51 (The pilgrimage of Alpha (Manuel Ancízar) in the northern provinces of New Granada, 1850–51) consists of articles written by Manuel Ancízar (1812–82), published in book form in 1853. Ancízar, who wrote under the pseudonym Alpha, was secretary of the Comisión Corográfica (Chorographic Commission) of New Granada (the Spanish viceroyalty that comprised all or parts of present-day Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, and Venezuela). Formed in 1849, the commission included engineers and geographers ...
Contributed by
National Library of Colombia
The Square of Barbacoas, Province of Barbacoas
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows several people in the main town square of Barbacoas (present-day Nariño Department), Colombia. Situated in a valley near the southwest Pacific coast, Barbacoas was the center of an extensive gold- and platinum-mining industry that flourished from the mid-17th century. The mines were worked by indigenous laborers and African slaves. Barbacoas was also the name of a province when Paz painted this picture in 1853. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of New ...
Contributed by
National Library of Colombia
Men Crafting Feluccas and Canoes, Province of Barbacoas
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows two men at work building boats in Barbacoas (present-day Nariño Department), Colombia. Located in the far southwest of Colombia near the border with Ecuador, Barbacoas is both a town and was the name of a province when Paz painted this picture. The man on the left is finishing a canoe. Behind the individual on the right is a felucca, inside the rough shelter. Transport of goods by river to the Pacific Ocean was an important aspect of the provincial economy of ...
Contributed by
National Library of Colombia
Porters in the Mountains of Barbacoas, Province of Barbacoas
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows two porters with heavy loads in the mountains of Barbacoas. One of the men has stopped to fix his shoe. Barbacoas is a municipality in present-day Nariño Department, in the far southwest of Colombia near the border with Ecuador. In 1853, when the picture was made, it was also the name of a province that stretched from the Pacific lowlands up to the mountains of the Cordillera Occidental. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of ...
Contributed by
National Library of Colombia
Exterior View of Palm Huts on the Beaches Across from Gorgona Island, Province of Barbacoas
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) depicts a village scene on the Pacific coast of Colombia, across the water from the island of Gorgona. Shown are two palm huts on stilts, surrounded by lush growth. Ships are visible in the bay. In the foreground a man is working with an axe. In 1853, when the picture was painted, Barbacoas Province stretched from the Pacific lowlands up to the mountains of the Cordillera Occidental. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population ...
Contributed by
National Library of Colombia
The Marimba, a Popular Musical Instrument, Province of Barbacoas
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows a man playing a marimba while another man listens. Similar to the xylophone but with a greater range of musical tones, the marimba consists of a series of bars that are struck with mallets. The instrument originated in Africa and made its way to Central and South America with the slaves brought from Africa to these regions. The painting is set in what was then Barbacoas Province, in the far southwest of Colombia near the border with Ecuador. The watercolor is ...
Contributed by
National Library of Colombia
The Interior of a Home on the Beach at Boquerones, Province of Barbacoas
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows the interior of a beachfront home and its inhabitants and possibly guests. On the right, a marimba hangs from the ceiling. The painting is set in what was then Barbacoas Province, in the far southwest of Colombia near the border with Ecuador. In 1853, when the picture was painted, Barbacoas Province stretched from the Pacific lowlands up to the mountains of the Cordillera Occidental. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of Colombia ...
Contributed by
National Library of Colombia
A Gold-Washing Technique, Province of Barbacoas
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows people panning for gold along a riverbank in what was then Barbacoas Province, in the far southwest of Colombia near the border with Ecuador. Behind them, two men are fishing. In 1853, when the picture was painted, Barbacoas Province stretched from the Pacific lowlands up to the mountains of the Cordillera Occidental. It was the center of an extensive gold- and platinum-mining industry that flourished from the mid-17th century. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity ...
Contributed by
National Library of Colombia
Indians Living by the Banks of the Tapaje River, Province of Barbacoas
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows a group of three Indians, described in the caption as living on the banks of the Tapaje River in what was then the Province of Barbacoas. The painting implicitly contrasts the large pot being fashioned by the person seated on the left, and the commercially-manufactured bottle held by the boy. In the distance are palm trees and a tropical blue sky. Located in the far southwest of Colombia near the border with Ecuador, Barbacoas Province stretched from the Pacific lowlands up ...
Contributed by
National Library of Colombia
Poncho Weaver in Cali, Province of Buenaventura
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows a man making woolen ruanas (ponchos) on a large foot-pedaled loom. Weaving of this kind was one of the most important crafts of the Indians of the Cordillera Occidental, in the Andean region in Colombia. In 1853, when Paz painted the picture, Cali was in the province of Buenaventura; it is now the capital of Valle del Cauca Department. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of Colombia and depicted the daily activities ...
Contributed by
National Library of Colombia
View of Cali and of the Snow-Capped Mount Huila, Province of Buenaventura
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows a view of the city of Cali with Mount Huila in the background. The mountain lies about 80 kilometers southeast of Cali and is an active volcano. Santiago de Cali, also known simply as Cali, is the third-largest city in present-day Colombia. In 1853, when Paz painted this picture, Cali was in the province of Buenaventura; today it is the capital of Valle del Cauca Department. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population ...
Contributed by
National Library of Colombia
Campesinos of Cali, Province of Buenaventura
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows three campesinos (Amerindian and mixed-race farmers or farm laborers) in a rural area of Cali, in what was then the province of Buenaventura in western Colombia. Cali is now the capital of Valle del Cauca Department. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of New Granada and depicted the daily activities and traditional customs of the country’s different ethnic, racial, and social groups. Paz was born in Almaguer in the province of ...
Contributed by
National Library of Colombia
View of the Mountains above Cali from a City Street, Province of Buenaventura
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows the streets of Cali, formally known as Santiago de Cali, in western Colombia. The majestic mountains in the background to the west of the city, known as the Farallones (rocky cliffs), are a part of the Cordillera Occidental of the Colombian Andes. At the time the watercolor was made, Cali was a part of Buenaventura Province. It is now the capital of Valle del Cauca Department. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population ...
Contributed by
National Library of Colombia
Mestizos of Cartago in a Roadside Shop, Province of Cauca
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows a mestizo (of mixed Amerindian and European ancestry) couple inside their roadside shop, possibly a food stall, from which they are about to make a sale to a passer-by. The scene is set in Cartago in western Colombia, then in the province of Cauca but now a part of the department of Valle del Cauca. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which captured the diversity of the population of New Granada and depicted the daily activities and traditional customs ...
Contributed by
National Library of Colombia
A Llapanga and a Mestizo of Cauca, Province of Cauca
This watercolor by Manuel María Paz (1820−1902) shows a distinctively clad llapanga arm in arm with a well-dressed mestizo. The llapangas, a term corrupted since Paz’s time to ñapangas, were working-class, mixed-race women. Llapanga means “barefoot,” one of the characteristics of these women, who tended to wear a cotton blouse with red or azure embroidery and a full flannel skirt with embroidered hem, and to have neat and well-groomed bare feet. Llapangas usually did embroidery, dressmaking, or shop work. The watercolor is typical of Paz’s work, which ...
Contributed by
National Library of Colombia