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17 results
Map of Asian Turkey, Persia, Afghanistan, Balochistan, and the Khanate of Bukhara, with Some of the Neighboring Countries
This 1848 map of the Middle East and parts of Central and South Asia is by the French cartographer and engraver Pierre M. Lapie (1779-1850), a colonel in the French army and head of the topographical section in the Ministry of War. Accurate and beautifully detailed, the map reflects the high quality of French cartography, and military cartography in particular. The territory covered includes the Nile Valley and the Nile delta, Cyprus and present-day Turkey, the countries of the eastern Mediterranean, Persia, Afghanistan, and Bukhara and other khanates in Central ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
A Protester during the Riots of February 1848
This daguerreotype portrait of a protester was made at the end of the riots of February 1848 in Paris. The unidentified photographer was most likely inexperienced in the technique, as the text on the flag, “République Liberté Egalité Fraternité 22, 23, 24 février” (Republic Liberty Equality Brotherhood, 22, 23, 24 February), is reversed. A professional photographer would have used the mirror system invented earlier to correct the image in the dark room. Beyond this misstep, however, the viewer can sense the photographer’s intense desire to immortalize the face of ...
Contributed by
National Library of France
Attack on a Barricade in Paris, 1848
This unsigned early pencil sketch by British artist John Everett Millais (1829-96) shows the chaos of the February 1848 revolution in Paris that ended the reign of Louis-Philippe and established the French Second Republic. In February 1848, the French merchant classes erected barricades throughout Paris to protest their lack of political rights and the difficulties caused by an extended economic depression. In an incident outside the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, a soldier fired into a crowd, inciting a riot. By the end of February, Louis-Philippe had fled and the opposition ...
Contributed by
Brown University Library
The Little Treatise on the Medical Treatment of the Back and of Hemorrhoids
The present manuscript preserves a copy of a brief medical treatise by the erudite polymath Aḥmad ibn ʻAbd al-Munʻim al-Damanhūrī (1690–1778). The name of al-Damanhūrī more traditionally is connected with his activity as a professor at Al-Azhar University in Cairo and with his numerous treatises on politics, Islamic law, logic, and rhetoric. One of his works, a fatwa in which he criticized the building of new churches and the reopening of old ones in 18th-century Cairo, recently has been published in English translation. The treatise in this manuscript shows ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Ancient Monuments of the Mississippi Valley
Early in the 19th century, as wagon trains streamed into the Ohio and Mississippi valleys, settlers came upon vast numbers of abandoned earthworks that they attributed to a sophisticated race of long-gone mound builders. Giving rise to often-loaded questions about human origins, the mounds and the artifacts found within them became the focus of early American efforts toward a science of archaeology. Ancient Monuments of the Mississippi Valley (1848) was the first major work in the nascent discipline as well as the first publication of the newly established Smithsonian Institution ...
Contributed by
Smithsonian Institution
Dance Performance of "Tsuri Shinobu Mebae no Fusuzuka"
The term ukiyo-e, literally “pictures of the floating world,”refers to a genre of Japanese artwork that flourished in the Edo period (1600–1868). As the phrase “floating world” suggests, with its roots in the ephemeral worldview of Buddhism, ukiyo-e captured the fleeting dynamics of contemporary urban life. While being accessible and catering to “common” tastes, the artistic and technical details of these prints show remarkable sophistication, their subjects ranging from portraits of courtesans and actors to classical literature. This nishiki-e, orfull-color print, by Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1798–1861) shows a ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
The Courtesan Shigeoka of Okamoto-ya; The Courtesan Sugatano of Sugataebi-ya; The Courtesan Hanamurasaki of Tama-ya
The term ukiyo-e, literally “pictures of the floating world,” refers to a genre of Japanese artwork that flourished in the Edo period (1600–1868). As the phrase “floating world” suggests, with its roots in the ephemeral worldview of Buddhism, ukiyo-e captured the fleeting dynamics of contemporary urban life. While being accessible and catering to “common” tastes, the artistic and technical details of these prints show remarkable sophistication, their subjects ranging from portraits of courtesans and actors to classical literature. Bijin-ga (pictures of beautiful women) capture the trends in feminine beauty ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Locomotive: Newspaper for the Political Education of the People, No. 1, April 1, 1848
The radical 1848 newspaper Locomotive is the most important journalistic work of Friedrich Wilhelm Alexander Held (1813–72). After pursuing a military career as an officer in the Prussian army, Held returned to civilian life and worked for a time as an actor and writer. In 1843, he moved to Leipzig where he published the newspaper, Die Lokomotive (The locomotive). The paper quickly achieved success, its circulation reaching some 12,000 copies per day. His paper was soon banned, even though Held was less a political radical than an advocate ...
Contributed by
Berlin State Library - Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation
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Penn Hotel & Denny's Harness Shop
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the building containing the hotel and tavern operated by John Thompson at 329 Market Street and Robert Denny's saddlery and harness store at 327½ Market Street. Harnesses and other horse paraphernalia hang above the shop's display window and entranceways, including a stable entrance marked "Entertainment for Horses." A man walks his horse through to the rear and a clerk from Denny's ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Saint John's Church, Philadelphia
This print shows an exterior view of the Gothic-style Roman Catholic Church, Saint John the Evangelist, located at 23–25 South 13th Street in Philadelphia. The church opened for services in April 1832. The print shows parishioners walking up the steps of the building and two women conversing on the sidewalk. An iron fence protects the building. The print was originally published as plate 19 in Views of Philadelphia, and Its Vicinity, published by the firm J.C. Wild & J.B. Chevalier, Lithographers (Philadelphia, 1838). The lithographic stones for the ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
State House. Philadelphia
This lithographic print shows the State House (Independence Hall) on Chestnut Street between 5th and 6th Streets in Philadelphia. Completed in 1753, to designs by Edmund Woolley and Andrew Hamilton, it first served as the colonial legislature for Pennsylvania. The building is best known as the site where the Declaration of Independence was adopted in 1776. The Greek Revival facade shown here was added by architect John Haviland in 1830. The print is by John Caspar Wild (circa 1804-46), a Swiss-born artist and lithographer who arrived in Philadelphia from Paris ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
The Eastern Penitentiary
This hand-colored lithograph shows a view looking over farmland toward the Eastern Penitentiary of Pennsylvania. In the foreground, a man and two boys survey the pastoral scene before the splendid gothic prison building. The penitentiary was built in 1823–36 after the designs of John Haviland and opened in an unfinished state in 1829. Located at 2101–99 Fairmount Avenue, it was one of the largest and most expensive structures of its day and was most unusual in having flush toilets and heating in the cells. The print is by ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Philadelphia from the Navy Yard
The shipyard at Front Street on the Delaware River in the Southwark section of Philadelphia became operational in 1776. In 1801 it became the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard and the first official base of the United States Navy. The larger ironclad warships introduced into the navy after the American Civil War required more space, and in 1871 the shipyard moved to League Island at the confluence of the Schuylkill and Delaware Rivers. This print by John Caspar Wild (circa 1804−46) shows the Delaware bustling with an assortment of vessels, including ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
U.S. Naval Asylum
The main building of the U.S. Naval Asylum (Biddle Hall) was designed by William Strickland (1787–1854) in 1826 and completed in 1833. Strickland was one of the first architects of the Greek Revival style in the United States and also a civil engineer. The columns on the asylum’s balconies were an innovative use of cast-iron as a building material. The U.S. Navy commissioned the building to house officers and seamen who had been disabled on duty as well as elderly and impoverished naval personnel. This print ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Custom House. Late U.S. Bank
This view looking east shows the Custom House, formerly the Second Bank of the United States, built in 1821–24 after the designs of William Strickland (1788–1854) at 420 Chestnut Street in Philadelphia. Also visible is the neighboring Bank of Philadelphia, completed in 1837, also after the designs of Strickland, at 400–408 Chestnut Street. Pedestrians traverse the sidewalks in front of the banks and across from the buildings. Couples promenade and greet each other and patrons convene in front of the Bank of Philadelphia. Also seen are two ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Philadelphia Horse & Carriage Bazaar, Southeast Corner of Ninth and George Streets, between Walnut and Chestnut Streets, Philadelphia
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows a view of Alfred M. Herkness' circular auction house on the 800 block of George Street (later Sansom Street). A man, possibly Herkness, stands in the doorway. Signs advertise the sale of horses, carriages, and harnesses, "twice every week." Harnesses are tacked along the doorway. Carriages, harnessed to horses and free-standing, line the streets, and men wait alongside the building. Also pictured are the ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Moyamensing Prison
This view shows the prison built in 1832−35 after the designs of Thomas Ustick Walter (1804−87) at Tenth and Reed Streets in Philadelphia. A horse-drawn wagon used to carry convicts, known as a Black Maria, draws toward the front of the Gothic-style building. Two men watch the carriage from near the road and two others are visible close to one of the battlement towers. The prison, which operated under a system of solitary confinement, was demolished in 1968. The print was originally published as Plate 9 in Views ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia