9 results
All Essential Matters on Firearms
This treatise, with rich illustrations, is entitled Huo gong qie yao (All essential matters on firearms). Its alternative title is Ze ke lu (Rules for defense). The text was originally dictated by Tang Ruowang (the Chinese name of the German Jesuit missionary Johann Adam Schall von Bell, 1592–1666) in 1643 and copied by the late-Ming scholar and expert on firearms, Jiao Xu (active 1643). Jiao Xu expressed his view that the technical standards of Chinese cannons and other artillery weapons were not inferior to those of the West and ...
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National Central Library
Work on Trigonometry
This work is a treatise on trigonometry by Li Madou, the Chinese name of the Italian Jesuit Matteo Ricci (1552–1610). Ricci left for China in 1581 and arrived in Macao in 1582. Together with Luo Mingjian (Michele Ruggieri, 1543–1607), he began his mission in Zhaoqing, Guangdong Province, where he published his Wan guo yu tu (Map of 10,000 countries), which was well received by Chinese scholars. He was expelled from Zhaoqing and went to Jiangxi, where in 1596 he became the superior of the mission. He lived ...
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National Central Library
Grammar of the Slavic Language
Ivan N. Momchilov was a noted teacher and textbook writer during the 19th-century era of the Bulgarian National Revival. As a teacher, he recognized the need for a basic primer for his pupils on Church Slavic, and set about writing such a work. His 1847 Grammar of the Slavic Language was Momchilov’s first textbook and the first Church Slavic grammar to be published in Bulgarian and by a Bulgarian. It was compiled using several other grammars as its foundation, namely those by the Russian Ivan Stepanovich Peninskii, by the ...
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Central Library of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences
The Sumo Wrestler Kagamiiwa of the West Side
The term ukiyo-e, literally “pictures of the floating world,” refers to a genre of Japanese artwork that flourished in the Edo period (1600–1868). As the phrase “floating world” suggests, with its roots in the ephemeral worldview of Buddhism, ukiyo-e captured the fleeting dynamics of contemporary urban life. While being accessible and catering to “common” tastes, the artistic and technical details of these prints show remarkable sophistication, their subjects ranging from portraits of courtesans and actors to classical literature. This sumo-e (pictures of sumo wrestlers), by Utagawa Toyokuni II, is ...
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Library of Congress
Treatise on Geometry
Yuan rong jiao yi (Treatise on geometry) is an 1847 edition of a work dictated in 1608 by the Italian Jesuit Matteo Ricci (1552–1610) to official and scholar Li Zhizao (1565–1630). Ricci, whose Chinese name was Li Madou, was one of the founding figures of the Jesuit mission in China. Li Zhizao was baptized by Ricci in 1610 and took the name Leo. He studied with Ricci and wrote prefaces to a number of his books. Ricci dictated several works to Li, who put them into acceptable Chinese ...
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National Central Library
January Sekku Festival
Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1797–1861) was a disciple of Utagawa ToyokuniⅠ(1769–1825), founder of the Utagawa school. In this work produced in about 1847, Kuniyoshi presents a typical New Year’s scene of the Edo period (1600–1867). In the center of the picture is a large kite with the image of Bodhidharma (also called Daruma), a Zen Buddhist sage of fearsome appearance who was often caricatured in Japan. Children are playing with the kite, around which stand three mothers with children. The pair in the middle is on the ...
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National Diet Library
Zulu Soldiers of King Panda’s Army, 1847
This lithograph is based on a drawing by the British-born artist, George French Angas (1822–86). Angas traveled to Australia and New Zealand in 1844–45, where he painted some of the earliest views of both countries. Upon his return to England, he showed his paintings to Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. In 1846, Angas left for South Africa, where he spent two years in Natal and the Cape. In 1849, the London firm of J. Hogarth published The Kafirs Illustrated, which included 30 lithographs based on drawings and watercolors ...
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Brown University Library
J.C. Jenkins and Company, Grocery and Tea Store, Southwest Corner of Chestnut and 12th Streets, Philadelphia
This print is an advertisement for the J.C. Jenkins & Company grocery store, located at the southwest corner of Chestnut and 12th Streets in Philadelphia. Boxes of tea and other supplies are piled on part of the sidewalk in front of the store. A woman and her son are visible through the open front door, conversing with the clerk behind a counter, while a well-dressed man with a walking stick passes by. Along the side of the building, where young trees and another pedestrian are seen, a sign advertises “choice ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
General View of Laurel Hill Cemetery
In the 1830s, a group of influential Philadelphians wanted to establish a rural cemetery that would be naturalistic, serene, and in genteel seclusion. They settled on Laurel Hill at 3822 Ridge Avenue, the former estate of merchant Joseph Sims, which had rocky bluffs and spectacular views and was about six kilometers from the city center. The cemetery was built in 1836–39 after the designs of Scottish-born architect and landscape designer John Notman. In the foreground, horse-drawn carriages approach the main gate (visible at left) of the cemetery, which contains ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia