25 results in English
All Essential Matters on Firearms
This treatise, with rich illustrations, is entitled Huo gong qie yao (All essential matters on firearms). Its alternative title is Ze ke lu (Rules for defense). The text was originally dictated by Tang Ruowang (the Chinese name of the German Jesuit missionary Johann Adam Schall von Bell, 1592–1666) in 1643 and copied by the late-Ming scholar and expert on firearms, Jiao Xu (active 1643). Jiao Xu expressed his view that the technical standards of Chinese cannons and other artillery weapons were not inferior to those of the West and ...
Contributed by National Central Library
Work on Trigonometry
This work is a treatise on trigonometry by Li Madou, the Chinese name of the Italian Jesuit Matteo Ricci (1552–1610). Ricci left for China in 1581 and arrived in Macao in 1582. Together with Luo Mingjian (Michele Ruggieri, 1543–1607), he began his mission in Zhaoqing, Guangdong Province, where he published his Wan guo yu tu (Map of 10,000 countries), which was well received by Chinese scholars. He was expelled from Zhaoqing and went to Jiangxi, where in 1596 he became the superior of the mission. He lived ...
Contributed by National Central Library
Map of Upper & Lower California Showing the Military Stations and Distribution of Troops
During the Mexican-American War of 1846–48, U.S. troops occupied parts of the Mexican territory of Alta (Upper) California in an arc from present-day Sacramento to San Diego. This hand-drawn map of 1847 shows the locations in Alta California where U.S. forces were stationed. The notation on the lower left-hand side gives the distances between sites and the numbers of men deployed. Longitude and latitude are marked but there is no exact scale. The map shows the extent of U.S. control, later to be formalized in the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Grammar of the Slavic Language
Ivan N. Momchilov was a noted teacher and textbook writer during the 19th-century era of the Bulgarian National Revival. As a teacher, he recognized the need for a basic primer for his pupils on Church Slavic, and set about writing such a work. His 1847 Grammar of the Slavic Language was Momchilov’s first textbook and the first Church Slavic grammar to be published in Bulgarian and by a Bulgarian. It was compiled using several other grammars as its foundation, namely those by the Russian Ivan Stepanovich Peninskii, by the ...
The Sumo Wrestler Kagamiiwa of the West Side
The term ukiyo-e, literally “pictures of the floating world,” refers to a genre of Japanese artwork that flourished in the Edo period (1600–1868). As the phrase “floating world” suggests, with its roots in the ephemeral worldview of Buddhism, ukiyo-e captured the fleeting dynamics of contemporary urban life. While being accessible and catering to “common” tastes, the artistic and technical details of these prints show remarkable sophistication, their subjects ranging from portraits of courtesans and actors to classical literature. This sumo-e (pictures of sumo wrestlers), by Utagawa Toyokuni II, is ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Treatise on Geometry
Yuan rong jiao yi (Treatise on geometry) is an 1847 edition of a work dictated in 1608 by the Italian Jesuit Matteo Ricci (1552–1610) to official and scholar Li Zhizao (1565–1630). Ricci, whose Chinese name was Li Madou, was one of the founding figures of the Jesuit mission in China. Li Zhizao was baptized by Ricci in 1610 and took the name Leo. He studied with Ricci and wrote prefaces to a number of his books. Ricci dictated several works to Li, who put them into acceptable Chinese ...
Contributed by National Central Library
January Sekku Festival
Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1797–1861) was a disciple of Utagawa ToyokuniⅠ(1769–1825), founder of the Utagawa school. In this work produced in about 1847, Kuniyoshi presents a typical New Year’s scene of the Edo period (1600–1867). In the center of the picture is a large kite with the image of Bodhidharma (also called Daruma), a Zen Buddhist sage of fearsome appearance who was often caricatured in Japan. Children are playing with the kite, around which stand three mothers with children. The pair in the middle is on the ...
Contributed by National Diet Library
Zulu Soldiers of King Panda’s Army, 1847
This lithograph is based on a drawing by the British-born artist, George French Angas (1822–86). Angas traveled to Australia and New Zealand in 1844–45, where he painted some of the earliest views of both countries. Upon his return to England, he showed his paintings to Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. In 1846, Angas left for South Africa, where he spent two years in Natal and the Cape. In 1849, the London firm of J. Hogarth published The Kafirs Illustrated, which included 30 lithographs based on drawings and watercolors ...
Contributed by Brown University Library
John Bancroft, Jr., Soap and Candle Manufactory, 19 Wood Street between Second & Third Streets & Vine & Callowhill Streets, Philadelphia
George G. Heiss was a mid-19th century Philadelphia lithographer, who specialized in views of fire-fighting equipment. This print advertises John Bancroft’s soap and candle business on the 200 block of Wood Street, Philadelphia. Signs reading "Steam Soap & Candle Manufactory" and "John Bancroft Jr." adorn the factory (left) and smaller adjoining office building (right). A clerk writing in an account book stands at the doorway of the office in which another clerk is visible through a window. Near the adjacent arched alleyway to the rear courtyard a boy carries a ...
Keyser & Foxe's Mahogany Steam Saw Mill & Turning Shop, Number 21 Crown Street between Race & Vine Streets, Philadelphia
George G. Heiss was a mid-19th century Philadelphia lithographer, who specialized in views of fire-fighting equipment. This lithograph advertises the sawmill run by Jacob Keyser and Bryan Fox at 21 (later 225) Crown Street. Three men work with mahogany logs. One of them guides a log onto a block-and-tackle lift from the sidewalk, while another holds the ropes and waits for the log on the second level. Another laborer moves a log on a ramp through an open doorway on the first floor. In the foreground, an unhitched dray stands ...
A. H. Eckhardt Soap and Candle Manufactory, Number 326 North Second Street, Philadelphia
George G. Heiss was a mid-19th century Philadelphia lithographer, who specialized in views of fire-fighting equipment. This lithograph advertisement shows the storefront of the Eckhardt soap and candle business on the 500 block of North Second Street between Noble and Green Streets. A store clerk, or possibly the proprietor, stands at the doorway, a quill in one hand and the other resting on a stack of boxes. He watches a laborer load boxes onto the Eckhardt horse-drawn wagon. Boxes, jars, crates, and other containers fill the large display window. The ...
J.C. Jenkins and Company, Grocery and Tea Store, Southwest Corner of Chestnut and 12th Streets, Philadelphia
This print is an advertisement for the J.C. Jenkins & Company grocery store, located at the southwest corner of Chestnut and 12th Streets in Philadelphia. Boxes of tea and other supplies are piled on part of the sidewalk in front of the store. A woman and her son are visible through the open front door, conversing with the clerk behind a counter, while a well-dressed man with a walking stick passes by. Along the side of the building, where young trees and another pedestrian are seen, a sign advertises “choice ...
P. Maison's Biscuit Bakery, 134 North Front Street, Philadelphia
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the busy three-story bakery at 134 (later 214) North Front Street. Banners attached to the building swing out to awning posts to proclaim "P. Maison's Bakery 134." Another "Bakery" sign extends over the adjacent alley between the business and the neighboring building. A gentleman, possibly the proprietor, stands at the entrance of the building as laborers transport and stack barrels at the open ...
Robert Wood's Steam Iron Railing Works, Ridge Road Above Buttonwood Street, Philadelphia
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the long and narrow steam-powered iron railing works on the 1100 block of Ridge Road owned by Robert Wood. Signboards on the facade advertise "Wood's steam iron railing manufactory, all kinds of ornamental & architectural iron work made to order" and "manufacturer of iron railings for cemeteries." Laborers are visible through the open windows and doors on all levels of the factory. Two men carry an iron piece into the building past a display of ornamental iron sculpture, which includes a large lyre. Workers in the street load and unload iron railings and bars. A crowded Girard College & Exchange line omnibus traveling north on Ridge Road has stopped by the factory, and children play on a makeshift seesaw alongside. The image is surrounded by a border of iron-work models; at the base are steps with ornate iron railings and a grand ornamental gateway. Wood’s firm was the largest supplier of sculptural and ornate ironwork to the Laurel Hill ...
Savery and Company Iron Hollow Ware Foundry
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the multiple buildings of the foundry established in 1841 on the 1400 block of South Front Street near Reed Street, which operated there until the late 19th century. The buildings, most with smokestacks, include an office, sheds, and shops. Foundry employees exit and enter the buildings, pile wood, lead horse-drawn carts and drays into and out of the small complex, and move cauldrons lining ...
T. E. Chapman, Book Store and Book Bindery, 74 North Fourth Street, Philadelphia
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the premises on the 100 block of North Fourth Street of the bookseller, binder, and publisher Thomas Ellwood Chapman. A male patron enters the store. A small broadside hangs in the door window, bundles of fibrous material rest atop the mantle, and shelves of books are visible lining the wall. A woman in the street stands to the side of the cellar doors closely ...
Patent Improved Lead Pipe Sheet Lead and Composition Gas Tubes, Manufactured by Tatham & Brothers, Office 15 Minor Street, Philadelphia, and 249 Water Street, New York
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the factory complex at 608 Delaware Avenue (occupied in 1844) for the lead pipe factory established in Philadelphia in 1841 by George N., Henry B., and William P. Tatham. The business office was in Minor Street. Employees work in front of the industrial factory building that is covered with signage and at its wharf. Men lift a barrel with a hoist, guide horse-drawn drays ...
Thomas Minford Wholesale and Retail Grocery and Tea Warehouse, South West Corner of Second and Walnut Streets, Philadelphia
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the premises of Thos. (Thomas) Minford, a southwest view of the three-story storefront and its signage, on the 200 block of Walnut Street. In front of the store, a female patron reaches into a sack, one of several sacks, crates, and canisters displayed near the open doorway. Within the store, a couple stands near rows of shelves. On the second floor, large, open panel ...
Western Paper Hangings Establishment, 501 Market Street, Philadelphia
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the four-story storefront of John Ward’s Western Paper Hangings, covered in signage on the 1300 block of Market Street near the corner of Oak Street. Signs advertise "Paper Hanging Wholesale & Retail" and "Cash Paid for Rags," a reminder that cotton rags from used clothing were the raw material of the best paper. Two male patrons enter the store as a lady departs with ...
William P. Cresson's Foundry, Willow above Thirteenth Street, Philadelphia
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the busy U-shaped iron foundry established circa 1846 at Willow Street (also known as James Street), above North 13th Street. Laborers work within the courtyard, at the entryways, and along the complex. In the courtyard, men work on and near a small raised platform in front of the smokestacks of a building with a steeply pitched roof. Stacks of flatbed crates line a small ...
Philadadelphia & New York Pekin Tea Company, North West Corner of Callowhill and Sixth Streets, Philadelphia
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the Philadelphia store of the Pekin Tea Company heavily adorned with lettering on the 600 block of Callowhill Street. Through the open entrances, clerks are visible standing at counters in front of shelves of boxes of tea. Within the large display windows, Chinese figurines of men and women flank additional merchandise displays. Two patrons pass stacked boxes of tea near the entrances as they ...
General View of Laurel Hill Cemetery
In the 1830s, a group of influential Philadelphians wanted to establish a rural cemetery that would be naturalistic, serene, and in genteel seclusion. They settled on Laurel Hill at 3822 Ridge Avenue, the former estate of merchant Joseph Sims, which had rocky bluffs and spectacular views and was about six kilometers from the city center. The cemetery was built in 1836–39 after the designs of Scottish-born architect and landscape designer John Notman. In the foreground, horse-drawn carriages approach the main gate (visible at left) of the cemetery, which contains ...
P. R. Schuyler, Furnishing Undertaker, Philadelphia. Northeast Corner of Beaver & 4th Streets, Philadelphia. Lots for Sale in Monument Cemetery on Reasonable Terms. Also Single Interments
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows a funeral procession led by an empty hearse passing by the residential business front of undertaker P.R. Schuyler on the northeast corner of Beaver and Fourth Streets. A sign with the name of the proprietor and illustrated with a coffin stands in the arbor adjacent to the building. Trees line the sidewalk on which a lady holding a parasol strolls by. She precedes ...
William W. Clark, Drug and Chemical Warehouse, 16 North Fifth Street, Philadelphia. Drugs, Medicines, Chemicals, Glass, & Et cetera. Paint, Oil, and Glass, English, French, German, & Mediterranean Drugs
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows the premises of William Clark, druggist, at 16 North Fifth Street. Signs advertise "Drugs, Paint, Oil, & Glass, English, French, German, & Mediterranean Drugs." Through the open entranceways of the business shelves of bottles on cabinets are visible lining the walls. A clerk reaches for one of the potions as a patron enters the store. Another clerk descends into the cellar in front of the building ...
Harrison Brothers' White Lead Works and Chemical Laboratory, Philadelphia
William H. Rease, born in Pennsylvania circa 1818, was the most prolific lithographer of advertising prints in Philadelphia during the 1840s and 1850s. This advertisement shows a bird's eye view of the chemical works of Harrison Brothers near Fitler and Harrison Streets in Frankford, lower northeast Philadelphia. The signs on the buildings, from left to right, read "Pyro Acid Works," "Sulphuric Acid Works," "Sugar Lead Works," "White Lead Works," "Alum Works," and "Copperas Works." The scene includes laborers pushing wheelbarrows, putting coal in a furnace, and hoisting barrels using ...