8 results
Newest Map of Arabia
This color map in German appeared as plate 80 in Grosser Hand-Atlas über alle Theile der Erde (Large portable atlas of all parts of the world), published by the Bibliographic Institute of Joseph Meyer (1796−1856). The map shows the Arabian Peninsula as well as neighboring parts of Africa, including Egypt, present-day Sudan, and Abyssinia (present-day Ethiopia). Colored lines are used to demarcate kingdoms and other political entities. El Bedaa, an old city in Qatar (now the Al Bida area of Doha), is shown. Three inset maps in the upper ...
Contributed by
Qatar National Library
New Physical, Political, Industrial and Commercial Map of Central America and the Antilles: With a Special Map of the Possessions of the Belgian Colonization Company of Central America, the State of Guatemala
Unlike Britain, France, Spain, the Netherlands, and Denmark, Belgium never had colonial possessions in the Americas. It entertained, nonetheless, certain colonial ambitions, as reflected in this map. Following the breakup of the United Provinces of Central America in the civil war of 1838-40, the caudíllo Rafael Carrera rose to power in Guatemala. Belgium became an important source of external support to the new regime as it struggled to consolidate itself as an independent state. The Compagnie belge de colonisation (Belgian Colonization Company), commissioned by Belgian King Leopold I, became the ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Iowa-Florida Act
In December 1838, delegates from the Territory of Florida met in the town of Saint Joseph to adopt a constitution, a necessary step toward becoming a state. It was not until March 3, 1845, however, that both houses of the United States Congress approved “An Act For The Admission of the States of Iowa and Florida Into The Union.” Florida was to be admitted to the union as a slave state and Iowa as a free state, thereby preserving the delicate political balance within the U.S. Senate between free ...
Contributed by
State Library and Archives of Florida
Bulgarian Phrasebook for Those Who Would Like to Speak Greek
Bulgarian Phrasebook for Those Who Would Like to Speak Greek is an 1845 phrasebook and manual for writing business letters in Greek for use by Bulgarians. It was not the first such business aid published in Bulgarian, but it is significant because of the importance of its author, Konstantin Fotinov (circa 1790–1858), a Bulgarian educator and editor of the first Bulgarian periodical, Liuboslovie (Philology). Fotinov recognized that in order to compete with the Greeks in the area of commerce, Bulgarians needed to be conversant in Greek, which was widely ...
Contributed by
Central Library of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences
Bulgarian Arithmetic
Arithmetics were a popular genre of textbooks during the era of the Bulgarian National Revival in the 19th century, when it was widely believed that everyone, especially future businessmen, needed to know basic mathematics. Bulgarian Arithmetic was the fourth such text published in this era, in 1845. The author, Khristodul Kostovich Sichan-Nikolov (1808–89), was a monk, teacher, writer, and publicist, often assisted in his scholarly pursuits by the writer, educator, and priest Neofit Rilski. Before writing his own text, Sichan-Nikolov had been involved as the editor of the first ...
Contributed by
Central Library of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences
A Historical, Geographical, and Statistical Description of the Russian Empire. Volume 1, Book 3. Olonetsk Province
This work by the historian and statistician Ivan Ilych Pushkarev (1808–48) is a historical and statistical description of the Russian province of Olonetsk, containing information about its geography, people, economic development, and government institutions. It was conceived as a fundamental work based on the materials of the ministries and statistical committees of the provinces. Pushkarev planned to publish 18 volumes with the descriptions of 76 provinces, regions, and districts, and a concluding historical and statistical description of the Russian Empire as a whole. However, he had time to prepare ...
Contributed by
Boris Yeltsin Presidential Library
Prayer Book of Düzdidil
This luxuriously decorated prayer book was commissioned around 1844 for Düzdidil, the third lady in the harem of the Ottoman sultan, Abdülmecid I (reigned, 1839–61). The occasion for the commission was tragic: the 19-year-old woman had fallen victim to the epidemic of tuberculosis then raging in Istanbul. As was fitting for her position, the prayer book is lavishly ornate. It contains 33 surahs of the Qur’an, 80 prayers of request and praise, and 61 miniatures. The rococo style of the manuscript corresponds to contemporary Ottoman taste. An artist ...
Contributed by
Bavarian State Library
North African Brigands and Arab, Circa 1845
This watercolor was painted by Frédéric Goupil-Fesquet (1817–78), a French artist of genre and history and a pioneer in photography. In 1839–40, he accompanied his uncle, the great French painter Horace Vernet (1789–1863), on a visit to North Africa and the Middle East. In 1843, Goupil-Fesquet published an account of their travels entitled Voyage d’Horace Vernet en Orient, which included 16 plates after Goupil-Fesquet. During the trip Goupil-Fesquet took some of the earliest known daguerreotype photographs of the region and its monuments. This watercolor, although it ...
Contributed by
Brown University Library