9 results
Persia, Arabia, Tartary, Afghanistan
This map by Thomas Gamaliel Bradford (1802–87), depicting parts of the Middle East and Central Asia, appeared in Bradford’s A Comprehensive Atlas: Geographical, Historical & Commercial, which was published in Boston in 1835. Bradford was born in Boston of a distinguished New England family. He made maps of both U.S. states and foreign countries and became the assistant editor of the Encyclopedia Americana, the first significant encyclopedia produced in the United States. The map uses colored lines to delineate the boundaries of the Persian Empire, Afghanistan, Arabia, and ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Grand Extraordinary Surprising Spectacle
This poster, dated 1835 and printed by the firm of Andreola in Treviso, Italy, advertises a show by the Acrobatic, Athletic, and Olympic Company, one of the last touring companies that performed in theaters in what was known as an acrobatic “cultured” repertoire show. Such shows combined dance and pantomime, with artists playing specific roles. Popular throughout the 18th century, the shows were no longer in vogue by this period.  Over time, the acrobatic artists, such as Pietro Bono, the tightrope walker featured in this poster, were incorporated into the ...
Contributed by
Educational Documentation Centre of Circus Arts (CEDAC)
Iran and Turan: Persia, Afghanistan, Baluchistan, Turkestan
This map of Central Asia appeared in the 1839 edition of Stieler's Hand-Atlas über alle Theile der Erde (Stieler’s portable atlas of all parts of the Earth), edited by Adolf Stieler and published by the firm of Justus Perthes in Gotha, Germany. The map was compiled and drawn in 1829 by Heinrich Karl Wilhelm Berghaus (1797−1884) and updated by him in 1834. The numbered key in the lower right-hand corner of the map indicates the states of the region as they existed in 1834. They included the ...
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Library of Congress
Brief Political Geography for the Instruction of Bulgarian Youth
The Brief Political Geography for the Instruction of Bulgarian Youth is the first general geography in Bulgarian. It was published in Kragujevac, Serbia, with the financial backing of the Serbian prince Miloš Obrenović.
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Bulgarian Grammar
Notable as the first Bulgarian grammar, this book is also culturally significant because of the role that its author, Neofit Rilski (1793–1881), played in the promotion of secular education in Bulgaria and in the establishment of a modern Bulgarian literary language. Neofit, a priest associated with the Rila Monastery, was a leading figure in the 19th-century Bulgarian National Revival and its concomitant education reform. He was the first headmaster of the Gabrovo School, the first secular school in Bulgaria. In the midst of a national debate in the 1830s ...
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Central Library of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences
Canons of the Council of 'Ain Traz
This manuscript contains the canons of the Synod of ‘Ain Traz, which was convened in 1835 by Patriarch Maximos III (Michael Mazlūm, died 1855). This assembly is especially significant for being the only Melkite synod fully ratified by Rome. It took place in 1841, the same year in which the Arabic text was printed in Rome. Included are 25 canons concerning all manner of church matters, which are indicated in the table of contents at the end. The manuscript is in Arabic, but the decretum of the Congregatio de Propaganda ...
Contributed by
Greek-Catholic Diocese of Aleppo
View of the Philadelphia Alms House: Blockley
This 1835 lithograph by George Lehman shows the Blockley Alms House in Philadelphia, as seen from Hyde Park on the east bank of the Schuylkill River. The view shows the riverbanks where two men fish and cows graze. A two-masted sailing ship passes by, with other ships on the river and the sprawling city stretched out in the background. William Strickland (1788–1854), a founder of Greek Revival architecture in the United States, designed the quadrangle of four large buildings that formed the almshouse. The original Philadelphia Alms House was ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Girard College, Main Building, Philadelphia
This print is a view of Founder's Hall, Girard College, Philadelphia, issued in around 1835 as a souvenir of the building while it was under construction. The text at bottom announces: “Girard College. Main Building. Now erecting near Philadelphia under the superintendence of T.U. Walter, Esq.” The building was designed in the Greek Revival style by Philadelphia architect Thomas Ustick Walter and constructed in 1833-47. It occupied a site between what became Girard Avenue and Ridge Avenue at Corinthian Avenue. Small figures are seen in front of the ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Philadelphia Exchange
This lithograph shows the view looking northeast from the intersection of Dock, Third, and Walnut Streets in Philadelphia to the Merchants' Exchange. Built between 1832 and 1833 to the designs of William Strickland (1788–1854), the exchange functioned as a commercial and financial hub and post office and was the first large central building in Philadelphia for the conduct of business. Men are seen walking, carriages are in the streets, and a horse-drawn omnibus has arrived at the front of the building. Fashionably dressed women stand on the corner across ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia