7 results
Sunshū ejiri
The term ukiyo-e, literally “pictures of the floating world,” refers to a genre of Japanese artwork that flourished in the Edo period (1600–1868). As the phrase “floating world” suggests, with its roots in the ephemeral worldview of Buddhism, ukiyo-e captured the fleeting dynamics of contemporary urban life. While being accessible and catering to “common” tastes, the artistic and technical details of these prints show remarkable sophistication, their subjects ranging from portraits of courtesans and actors to classical literature. Katsushika Hokusai was an artist and woodblock printer who contributed greatly ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
The Water's Surface at Misaka in Koshu
The term ukiyo-e, literally “pictures of the floating world,” refers to a genre of Japanese artwork that flourished in the Edo period (1600–1868). As the phrase “floating world” suggests, with its roots in the ephemeral worldview of Buddhism, ukiyo-e captured the fleeting dynamics of contemporary urban life. While being accessible and catering to “common” tastes, the artistic and technical details of these prints show remarkable sophistication, their subjects ranging from portraits of courtesans and actors to classical literature. Katsushika Hokusai was an artist and woodblock printer who contributed greatly ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Horizontorium
This lithograph shows a morphed view of the gothic Bank of Philadelphia building erected in 1808 to designs by Benjamin Henry Latrobe at the southwest corner of Fourth and Chestnut Streets. The original drawing is by William G. Mason, whose perspective of the bank makes it look almost like a cathedral. The print is by John Jessie Barker (active circa 1815−60) and is the only known example of his work. A gate, lawn, and trees surround the building and a turreted outbuilding is visible on the property. Couples and ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Railway Depot at Philadelphia
This lithograph of 1832 shows the depot of the Philadelphia, Germantown, and Norristown Rail Road Company, located at the junction of Green and Ninth Streets, Philadelphia. In the foreground is a locomotive, which is seen pulling passenger cars. The Philadelphia, Germantown, and Norristown Rail Road Company was incorporated on February 17, 1831, under a charter enacted by the Pennsylvania legislature. Rails were laid between Philadelphia and Germantown and the line was opened on June 6, 1832. The first trains were drawn by horses and covered the six miles (9.66 ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
The Gold and Silver Artificers of Philadelphia. In Civic Procession, 22 February 1832
The event shown in this lithograph is the civic procession held in Philadelphia on February 22, 1832, in honor of the centennial anniversary of George Washington's birth. Onlookers cheer the participants in front of the Second Bank on Chestnut Street, between 4th and 5th Streets. City officials and other prominent people of Philadelphia lead the parade, followed by tradesmen, volunteer fire companies, and the military. The top-hatted artisans (the artificers of the title, who struck special commemorative medals for the event) are led by a mounted parade marshal, their ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Friends Asylum for the Insane near Frankford
This lithograph depicts the first private psychiatric hospital in the United States as it appeared in the early 1830s. Known as the Friends’ Asylum for the Insane, it was founded in 1813 by the Society of Friends (also called the Quakers) and opened to patients in 1817. The institution stood on land that formerly was a 52-acre farm in Oxford Township, near Frankford, six miles (10 kilometers) northeast of the center of Philadelphia. Shown here is an exterior view of the almshouse building as it appeared after two patient wings ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia
Taylor and Teese, Saddlers, and A. R. Chambers, Currier, 67 and 69 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia
This lithographic advertisement shows the four-story adjacent storefronts for Andrew R. Chambers, leather dealer, and Taylor & Teese, saddlers, at 67−69 (now 223−25) Chestnut Street in Philadelphia. Signage for the businesses, the street numbers, and a drain pipe marked "1832" adorn the building. Merchandise fills the display windows of Taylor & Teese and the sidewalk in front of the store is piled up with a stack of trunks, a harness, saddles, and a feedbag. Rolled merchandise is also visible through the open doorway of Chambers. Taylor & Teese and Chambers were ...
Contributed by
The Library Company of Philadelphia