6 results
The Supreme Method and the Pure Source on the Rules of Notarization
Aḥmad ibn Yaḥyá al-Wansharīsī (1430 or 1431–1508) was a jurist and scholar of the Maliki school of Islamic jurisprudence. He was born in Jabal Wansharīs, but his family moved when he was a child to nearby Tilimcen in present-day western Algeria, where he studied and later taught Maliki law. His relationship with Tilimcen ruler Sultan Muhammad IV of the Banu Abd al-Wad dynasty soured under circumstances that are unclear, and he consequently fled to Fez, Morocco. With the help of his former student Muhammad ibn al-Gardīs, al-Wansharīsī was able ...
Contributed by
King Abdulaziz University Library
General Map of European Turkey, Greece and the Ionian Islands
Adrien-Hubert Brué (1786−1832) was a French geographer and cartographer who as a young man accompanied the explorer Nicolas Baudin on his 1800−1803 voyage to New Holland (Australia). Brué returned to France to become an important geographer, associated with the Institut Geographique de Paris and geographer to the king. His Grand atlas universel (Large universal atlas) was first published in 1816 and issued in revised and updated editions in 1825, 1830, and 1838. Shown here is Brué’s map of the Ottoman Empire in Europe, Greece, and the Ionian ...
Contributed by
National and University Library “St Kliment Ohridski” – Skopje
Revised World Map
This world map was completed by Takahashi Kageyasu (1785−1829) of Tenmonkata (the office in charge of astronomy). He began the work on the 1807 by order of the shogunate government, with the assistance of astronomer Hazama Shigetomi and Dutch interpreter Baba Sajūrō, who was summoned to Edo (present-day Tokyo) from Nagasaki in 1808. Kageyasu submitted the first version of the map to the government in 1810. The East Asian region was later revised and this version of the map was etched by Aōdō Denzen in 1816. The year of ...
Contributed by
National Diet Library
Map of the Border of the King's Dominion in the Northern America
This pen-and-ink and watercolor map of the internal provinces of New Spain (present-day Mexico and the U.S. Southwest) is a composite prepared from a map of 1771 produced by José de Urrútia and Nicolas de la Fora on the basis of their 1766-68 expedition to survey the presidios and defenses of northern New Spain. A note on the map indicates that it is a copy made in Mexico on August 7, 1816. The map includes pictorial representation of mountain ranges, streams, administrative boundaries, presidios, European and Native American settlements ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Map of the United States of America: With the Contiguous British and Spanish Possessions, 1816
This 1816 map by John Melish (1771–1822) is the first to show the United States as a continental state, stretching from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific. Melish was a Scot who traveled extensively in the United States in 1806–7. In 1809 he returned to America and settled permanently in Philadelphia, where he advertised himself as “Geographer and Publisher” and set up the first U.S. firm dedicated to map publishing. In an accompanying booklet to this map, Melish explained that he initially intended to end his map ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Japan, Hokkaido to Kyushu
This map was created by Tadataka Inō (1745–1818), an amateur astronomer and surveyor who produced maps of extraordinary accuracy and had a great impact on cartography in Japan. Spanning a total of 214 sheets, Inō’s large map of Japan shows the coastal outlines of the entire archipelago along with rivers and major roads. To complete the map, Inō and his team took a total of ten surveying trips over the course of more than 16 years. They used the traverse surveying technique rather than triangulation, measuring distances with ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress