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8 results
Map of Spain and Portugal, Corrected and Augmented from the Map Published by D. Tomas Lopez
Tomás López (1730-1802) was a Spanish cartographer who was sent by the Spanish government to Paris for a number of years to learn cartography and engraving from the great French mapmaker Jean Baptiste Bourguignon d’Anville (1697-1782). In 1804, López published his Atlas Geográfico de España (Geographical atlas of Spain), the first atlas of Spain produced by a Spaniard. López’s children republished this work in a new edition in 1810, and again in 1830.
Contributed by
National Library of Brazil
Clark's Map of 1810
When the United States purchased Louisiana from France in April 1803, the extent and character of the land was uncharted. On May 14, 1804, Captains Meriwether Lewis and William Clark set out on an expedition to explore the new territory that would fundamentally change Americans’ conceptions of their country. Clark served as the expedition’s principal cartographer. After completing the three-year journey from St. Louis to the Pacific Ocean and back, Clark worked at compiling a comprehensive map of the American West, using his personal knowledge and information gleaned from ...
Contributed by
Yale University Library
A Garland of New Songs: Lovely Kitty; Woo'd and Married and A'; The Battle of Sherra-Muir; If He Will Take the Hint; By the Gaily Circling Glass
Robert Burns (1759-96) is best known for his poems and songs that reflect Scotland's cultural heritage. He was born in Alloway, Ayrshire, Scotland, the first of seven children belonging to William Burnes, a tenant farmer, and his wife Agnes Broun. Burns had little formal education, but he read English literature and absorbed the traditional, largely oral Scots-language folk songs and tales of his rural environment. He began to compose songs in 1774, and published his first book, Poems, Chiefly in the Scottish Dialect, in 1786. The work was a ...
Contributed by
University of South Carolina
A Garland of New Songs: The Death of Nelson; Lochaber; The Yellow-Hair'd Laddie; Whistle, and I'll Come to You, My Lad; The Yorkshire Concert
Robert Burns (1759-96) is best known for his poems and songs that reflect Scotland's cultural heritage. He was born in Alloway, Ayrshire, Scotland, the first of seven children belonging to William Burnes, a tenant farmer, and his wife Agnes Broun. Burns had little formal education, but he read English literature and absorbed the traditional, largely oral Scots-language folk songs and tales of his rural environment. He began to compose songs in 1774, and published his first book, Poems, Chiefly in the Scottish Dialect, in 1786. The work was a ...
Contributed by
University of South Carolina
'Id (Feast Day) Poem
This calligraphic panel includes a ruba'i (iambic pentameter quatrain), signed and dated in the lower-left corner by the calligrapher Mir Muhammad Salih: “written by Mir Muhammad Salih, 1225” (AD 1810). Although little is known about the calligrapher, the date proves that this work dates from the early 19th century. The text is executed in black (Indian) naskh script on a beige sheet of paper, framed in a blue border decorated with gold leaf and vine motifs. Before the quatrain begins, a short invocation of God that reads "he is ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Chinese General’s Wife
This work is one of a pair of original unsigned gouache watercolors, painted by an unknown hand and dating from the early 19th century, depicting a Chinese general and his wife. Shown here is the general’s wife, seated outside a row of tents. Near her is a staff with an oval shield bearing an animated and fearsome face. The same shield appears in her husband’s portrait, but with a different banner above it. The wife’s lady-in-waiting is kneeling at her right. Both women wear finely detailed costumes ...
Contributed by
Brown University Library
Chinese General, Circa 1810
This work is one of a pair of original unsigned gouache watercolors, painted by an unknown hand and dating from the early 19th century, depicting a Chinese general and his wife. Shown here is the general, who is seated outside his tent. He is wearing an elaborate gown and holds a spear. The tent pole bears an oval shield with an animated and fearsome face above which a standard banner flutters in the breeze. To the left is a standard bearer standing with a command flag. The same shield appears ...
Contributed by
Brown University Library
The New Map of the North of the Coast of Brazil Showing Distances of the Pará and Amazon Rivers
This early-19th century pen-and-ink watercolor map of the northern coast of Brazil shows the Pará River, an estuary of the Amazon that empties into the Atlantic to the southeast of the main river delta.
Contributed by
National Library of Brazil