Narrow results:

Place

Time Period

Topic

Additional Subjects

Type of Item

Language

Institution

13 results
Letters, Pedagogical Teachings, and Sayings of Saint Anthony of Egypt
This manuscript opens with the 20 letters “to the sons who follow his [Anthony’s] gentle path…and prayers to keep us from Satan’s example.” The letters are for the most part short, many not exceeding five folios. According to an introductory note, they are addressed to both men and women. The work is in a bold but relaxed hand. Each letter or other significant section is set off in red. There are no contemporary marginal glosses, but comments and corrections (some in English) in pencil were made by ...
Contributed by
The American University in Cairo Rare Books and Special Collections Library
Geographical Map of Modern Northern Greece
The long subtitle of this Latin map of northern Greece explains that it depicts “the provinces of Macedonia, Thessaly, and Albania, in the last one of which the dwellings of the Montenegrin people located in the county of Zenta are indicated, together with the neighboring regions and islands, drawn by very recent and new auxiliary troops according to the rule of correct projections in use in the current war.” In 1770, when the map was published, these lands were all part of the Ottoman Empire. Zenta, or Zeta, refers to ...
Contributed by
National and University Library “St Kliment Ohridski” – Skopje
Beauties of Yoshiwara
Seirō Bijin Awase (Beauties of Yoshiwara) is one of the finest multicolored woodblock printed books in Japan. It was published in 1770. The book depicts 166 courtesans of the Yoshiwara, the pleasure quarter in Edo (present-day Tokyo), with the names of the courtesans and the brothels where they worked, with a haiku (a short poem) in the background of each illustration. The work consists of five sections in five chapters. The original title slip on which the book title and the volume title were printed is attached to the center ...
Contributed by
National Diet Library
The Bloody Massacre Perpetrated in King Street, Boston, on March 5th 1770 by a Party of the 29th Regiment
In Boston in the late 1760s, the stirrings of what became the American Revolution began as residents grew angry about the heavy taxation to which they were subjected. With the Townshend Acts of 1767, the British placed taxes on imported goods, including glass, lead, paint, paper, and tea. To enforce the acts, they imposed a heavy military presence on the Massachusetts colonists that exacerbated tensions between the local populace and representatives of the crown. On March 5, 1770, British sentries guarding the Boston Customs House were surrounded by jeering Bostonians ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
The Actor Ichikawa Danzō
The term ukiyo-e, literally “pictures of the floating world,” refers to a genre of Japanese artwork that flourished in the Edo period (1600–1868). As the phrase “floating world” suggests, with its roots in the ephemeral worldview of Buddhism, ukiyo-e captured the fleeting dynamics of contemporary urban life. While being accessible and catering to “common” tastes, the artistic and technical details of these prints show remarkable sophistication, their subjects ranging from portraits of courtesans and actors to classical literature. Shunshō (1726–93) was a leading artist of the Katsukawa school ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
The Actor Nakajima Kanzaemon
The term ukiyo-e, literally “pictures of the floating world,” refers to a genre of Japanese artwork that flourished in the Edo period (1600–1868). As the phrase “floating world” suggests, with its roots in the ephemeral worldview of Buddhism, ukiyo-e captured the fleeting dynamics of contemporary urban life. While being accessible and catering to “common” tastes, the artistic and technical details of these prints show remarkable sophistication, their subjects ranging from portraits of courtesans and actors to classical literature. Shunshō (1726–93) was a leading artist of the Katsukawa school ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Map of the Port of Mauritius
This late-18th century Spanish manuscript map depicts Port Louis and vicinity on the island of Mauritius in the Indian Ocean. The map is oriented with southeast at the top. It shows the coastline, coastal features, soundings, anchorages, fortifications, a battery, windmill, hospital, storehouse, and the port. It also includes a keyed legend. The map is part of the Library of Congress’s collection from the Real Escuela de Navegación, Cadiz, Spain, purchased from Maggs Brothers, London. Arab and Malay sailors knew of Mauritius as early as the 10th century. The ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
Plan of Table Bay with the City of Cape Town
This 1770 Spanish manuscript map depicts the Cape of Good Hope at the southern tip of the continent of Africa. The map shows the coastline, coastal features, soundings, anchorages, a settlement, and a pictorial representation of a ship. It is oriented with east at the top. A note on the map indicates that Cape Town was inhabited by the Dutch, and that the map is a copy of a 1765 original prepared by a frigate of the British East India Company, whose officers allowed a copy to be made in ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress
The Battle of Oroi-Jalatu
The “Battle Copper Prints” are a series of prints from copper engravings dating from the second half of the 18th century. They were commissioned by the Qianlong emperor of the Qing dynasty (1644–1911), who ruled from 1735 to 1796. They depict his military campaigns in China’s inner provinces and along the country’s frontiers. The master illustrations for the engravings were large paintings done by European missionary artists employed at that time at the court in Beijing. These artists were Italian Jesuit Giuseppe Castiglione (1688–1766), French Jesuit ...
Contributed by
Berlin State Library - Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation
A Victory Banquet Given by the Emperor for the Distinguished Officers and Soldiers
The “Battle Copper Prints” are a series of prints from copper engravings dating from the second half of the 18th century. They were commissioned by the Qianlong emperor of the Qing dynasty (1644–1911), who ruled from 1735 to 1796. They depict his military campaigns in China’s inner provinces and along the country’s frontiers. The master illustrations for the engravings were large paintings done by European missionary artists employed at that time at the court in Beijing. These artists were Italian Jesuit Giuseppe Castiglione (1688–1766), French Jesuit ...
Contributed by
Berlin State Library - Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation
Map of the City of Rio de Janeiro: Situated at Latitude 22 Degrees 54' and Longitude 334 Degrees 53' from the Meridian of the Island of Ferro
This pen-and-ink watercolor map shows the city of Rio de Janeiro and the surrounding coastline around 1770, shortly after it became the colonial capital city of Portuguese Brazil. The map is the work of Manoel Vieira Leão (1727-1803), an assistant to the governor of the city.
Contributed by
National Library of Brazil
Topographic Map of New Discovery of the Corner in the Village of Cuiaba
This hand-colored map shows the village of Cuiabá in Brazil’s Mato Grosso state. The town was founded in 1727, after gold was discovered in the region. This map, made more than 40 years later, still shows a small village.
Contributed by
National Library of Brazil
View of Philadelphia, Circa 1770
Philadelphia, site of both Continental Congresses, was one of the largest and most advanced cities in America in the 18th century. This print from the 1770s, probably made shortly before the start of the American War of Independence, depicts Philadelphia as a European port city, with substantial buildings along a busy waterfront. The caption at the bottom reads, in German and in French: “Philadelphia, the capital of the North American province of Pennsylvania, which was founded by William Penn (who was granted the entire province by King Charles II of ...
Contributed by
Library of Congress