4 results
The Finest of Adornments is an Exposition on the Jewels of Faith
This manuscript, written in 1754, is a commentary on an earlier work by a Turkish author. The manuscript is from the Bašagić Collection of Islamic Manuscripts, located in the University Library of Bratislava, Slovakia, which was inscribed on the UNESCO Memory of the World register in 1997. Safvet beg Bašagić (1870-1934) was a Bosnian scholar, poet, journalist, and museum director who assembled a collection of 284 manuscript volumes and 365 print volumes that reflect the development of Islamic civilization from its inception to the early 20th century. The manuscript is ...
Contributed by
University Library in Bratislava
View of the Island and the City of Batavia Belonging to the Dutch, for the India Company
This hand-colored engraving of the Dutch colonial capital of Batavia (present-day Jakarta) was created by Jan Van Ryne in 1754. Van Ryne was born in the Netherlands, but spent most of his working life in London, where he specialized in producing engravings of scenes from the British and Dutch colonies. Located at the mouth of the Ciliwung River, Jakarta was the site of a settlement and port possibly going back as far as the fifth century A.D. In 1619, the Dutch captured and razed the existing city of Jayakerta ...
Contributed by
Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and the Caribbean Studies KITLV
The Foundations of Justice for Legal Guardians, Governors, Princes, Meritorious Rulers, and Kings (The Administration of Justice for Governors, Princes and the Meritorious Rulers)
Timbuktu (present-day Tombouctou in Mali), founded around 1100 as a commercial center for trade across the Sahara Desert, was also an important seat of Islamic learning from the 14th century onward. The libraries there contain many important manuscripts, in different styles of Arabic scripts, which were written and copied by Timbuktu’s scribes and scholars. These works constitute the city’s most famous and long-lasting contribution to Islamic and world civilization. ‘Uthmān ibn Muḥammad ibn ‘Uthmān ibn Fūdī (1754–1817) was a scholar and the founder of the Fulani ...
Contributed by
Mamma Haidara Commemorative Library
The Authoritative Source for Religious Scholars
Timbuktu (present-day Tombouctou in Mali), founded around 1100 as a commercial center for trade across the Sahara Desert, was also an important seat of Islamic learning from the 14th century onward. The libraries there contain many important manuscripts, in different styles of Arabic scripts, which were written and copied by Timbuktu’s scribes and scholars. These works constitute the city’s most famous and long-lasting contribution to Islamic and world civilization. Kitāb ‘Umdat al-‘Ulamā’ (The authoritative source for religious scholars) argues for the primacy of the ulama (Islamic scholars ...
Contributed by
Mamma Haidara Commemorative Library