20 results in English
Treatise on Friendship
You lun (Treatise on friendship), also entitled Jiao you lun (Treatise on making friends), is by the Jesuit missionary Matteo Ricci (1552–1610), who also added a Latin title, De Amicitia. Written for the general non-Christian Chinese reader, it elaborates on the concept of virtuous friendship and reflects Ricci’s efforts to bring Renaissance and humanist culture to China. According to Si ku quan shu ti yao (Annotated bibliography of the Imperial Library), the work was recommended by Qu Rukui (born 1549), a member of a noted family of officials ...
Contributed by National Central Library
Snippets on the Three Calendars
Presented here is a manuscript copy of a Song edition of a collection of calendars, issued in the late-Ming dynasty by Jiguge, the largest private publishing house established in the late Ming. The work has three parts. Part one contains supplements on the auspicious days in each of the 12 months for the following activities: weddings, marriage proposals, gift giving, travel, boarding a ship, taking office, starting construction, scaffolding a house, digging the ground, moving into a house, burial, wearing and taking off a robe, filing a suit, opening a ...
Contributed by National Central Library
Map of Jiangxi Province with Explanations
This lively and colorful volume contains a collection of 37 maps of Jiangxi province from the Ming dynasty: a general map (26 by 56 centimeters) and 36 maps of individual prefectures and counties (each 28 by 26 centimeters). The work is the earliest extant map of Jiangxi province and constitutes a valuable resource for researching pre-modern Chinese maps and the geography of Jiangxi. It also shows the quality of traditional cartography in Ming China. The maps employ traditional Chinese drawing methods to depict in precise detail mountain passes, rivers, lakes ...
Contributed by National Library of China
Anatomical Fugitive Sheets of a Skeleton, Male Figure and a Female Figure
These woodcut anatomical sheets of male and female figures, published in Germany in 1573, reflect the state of anatomical knowledge at that time. The explanatory texts on each sheet are in Latin, with some names of anatomical parts also given in Greek. The sheets use movable flaps that can be raised to show cut-aways of the viscera attached beneath. The sheets have accessory figures that depict various parts of the body, with corresponding explanatory texts.
Contributed by Wellcome Library
Illustrated Album of Yangzhou Prefecture
The album, by an unknown artist, contains twelve illustrations depicting Yangzhou Prefecture and the eleven counties of Jiangdu, Guazhou, Yizhen, Qinxing, Gaoyou, Xinghua, Baoying, Qinzhou, Rugao, Tongzhou, and Haimen. Each illustration is followed by an essay on the history of the county depicted. Situated along the Grand Canal and close to the Yangtze River, Yangzhou had been a leading economic and cultural center and major trading port since the Tang dynasty. This work provides both textual and visual testimony to its place in history. The information in the county histories ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Imperative Doctrines for Human Nature and Longevity
This work has been attributed to the disciples of Yinzhenren, the Daoist immortal, who narrated his doctrines to them. It was originally part of the collection of Tang Xin'an and was printed by his nephew, Wu Zhihe. The woodblocks later were acquired by the Di Xuan Ge workshop. The content suggests that it is a Ming work, possibly by Tang Xin’an himself. Wu Zhihe was a native of She Xian, Anhui province, who hired the famed engraver Huang Bofu of Xin’an. These vividly executed illustrations are considered ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Memorials to the Throne of Our Glorious Dynasty
This work was one of the banned books in the Qing dynasty. Book banning and destruction have a long history in China and became especially prevalent under Emperor Qianlong (reigned 1736–95) of the Qing dynasty, when the encyclopedia of the Si ku quan shu (The complete library of the four treasuries) was in progress. Some 3,100 works, about 150,000 copies of books, were either burnt or banned. Books on Ming history, biography, philosophy, literature, and even some works on science, technology, and economics that were regarded as ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Compendium of Materia Medica
Printed during the Wanli period, Ben cao gang mu (Compendium of materia medica) is a work on an encyclopedic scale, in 52 juan of text with two juan of illustrations, in 25 volumes. It was compiled by Li Shizhen (circa 1518–93), a native of Sichuan, who was one of the greatest physicians, pharmacologists, and naturalists in Chinese history. After serving for only one year in the prestigious Imperial Medical Institute, Li returned home to work as a doctor and to begin writing this book. The work and its three ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Treatise on Diagnoses and Treatments of Zang and Fu Organs with Illustrations of Human Body
This printed edition, in eight juan, with two juan of supplements, in six volumes, was published in the 34th year of the Wanli reign (1608). The work has some characteristic features of Ming printing, its woodblocks being cut with extreme care and precision, the typeface mostly cut in square shape, and the binding stitch-bound. The author of the original work is unknown. The preface dated 1606 by Qian Lei, a Ming dynasty physician from Siming (present-day Ningbo Shi, Zhejiang Province), states that he had acquired a book entitled Zang ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Expanded Edition of the Collected Works from the Lotus Studio
This is a printed edition of writings by Yang Yikui (flourished 1592–1607), possibly printed in Zhejiang Province. Si ku cun mu (Catalog of books not included in the general catalog of the Si ku Collection) lists the original title as a work in two juan from a private collection in Zhejiang, one consisting of poetry and the other of essays. As the title indicates, this is an expanded edition in nine juan and in four volumes, published during the Wanli period, in which Yang’s later writings were added ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Factual Records on Huaiyin
Huaiyin, also known as Huai’an, was a prefectural city in Jiangsu Province, situated on an ancient section of the Grand Canal and the Huai River, major waterways for transporting grain. The Huai linked the Yellow River and Yangtze River, and, like them, originally ran from west to east, flowing directly to the sea. In the 12th century, Jin and Song armies, using flooding as a weapon of war, changed the course of the Yellow River so that it flowed south into the Huai. The Yellow River sediment gradually brought ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Gazetteer of Yicheng
Gazetteers provide in-depth information and sources for the study of Chinese history, geography, local economy, culture, language and dialects, biographies, as well as the administration of local government at a given period. This local gazetteer of Yicheng County, Shanxi Province, in 12 juan, in six volumes, is one of the many editions issued over the centuries, beginning with the Jiajing reign (1522–66) and continuing until the Republican period in 1920s. Yicheng was famed for its rich history, culture, art, and trade. Among its famous natives was the mother of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Miscellaneous Works of Zou Deyong
The author of this work was Zou Deyong, a native of Anfu, Jiangxi Province, grandson of Zou Shouyi (1491–1562). The elder Zou was one of the exponents of the school of Wang Yangming, the Neo-Confucian philosopher, who was a leading figure in Ming Neo-Confucianism and a proponent of education. After receiving his jin shi degree in 1616, Zou Deyong served as a censor and later as supervisor of censors at the Bureau of Revenue and the Bureau of Rites. He later was removed from office for displeasing the emperor ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Collected Works of Wang Yu'ai
This collection consists of works by Wang Huai, a native of Xiuning, Anhui Province, a poet and calligrapher, whose style name was Yu’ai. The work has eight juan in six volumes and was printed during the Wanli reign (1573–1620) of the Ming dynasty. The eight juan contain Wang Huai’s verse in various formats, including poems in folk song style, poems in five-character or seven-character lines, pentasyllabic and heptasyllabic verse or quatrains, and long regulated verse. His poems followed the style of the so-called former and later seven ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Collected Works Compiled and Printed by Ye Zigu
This volume is a collection of works, in various literary forms, written by unknown writers of the Song and Yuan dynasties (960–1368), selected and compiled by Ye Zigu during the Wanli reign (1573–1620) of the Ming dynasty. The inscription on the cover states that it was printed, using the original Anhui woodblocks, by Sizhiguan, a printing workshop owned by a man named Yang Jin. The selected verses and essays lean towards humor and include some doggerel. Other similar collections of that period were identified by their authors, but ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Poems and Essays of Master Qiongtai
This work is a collection of poetry and essays by Jiang Mian (1462–1532; commonly known as Master Qiongtai), a child prodigy who, in 1477, at the age of 15, achieved the highest score in the provincial civil examination. Together with his brother, he received his jin shi degree in 1487 and was selected as a compiler of the Hanlin Academy. A Hanlin compiler’s tasks included drafting imperial orders and decrees, compiling and editing historical works, interpreting the classics, and nurturing and training students. Jiang assumed a number of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Random Notes from the Xiaoxin Pavilion
The author of this work was Gu Xiancheng (1550–1612), a late-Ming grand secretary and renowned educator. In 1604, together with his brother and a friend Gao Panlong, Gu revived a defunct Song institution named Donglin Academy at his native Wuxi, which became a locally based educational institution that held lectures attended by thousands. Later it extended to loosely associated groups in other cities. The Donglin’s opposition to the powerful eunuch Wei Zhongxian resulted in the closure of the academy in 1622, but it reopened during the early Qing ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Teachings of Li Jianluo
This work is a collection of writings by Li Cai (1529–1606), a native of Fengcheng, Jiangxi Province. Li Cai, also called Jianluo xian sheng (Master Jianluo), received his jin shi degree in 1562. He worked in various positions, including in a military post during the campaign against Burma in the Wanli reign. He enjoyed a series of promotions, but also suffered imprisonment. He was chiefly known as a philosopher, a Neo-Confucian, and a teacher. His biography is recorded in the 227th juan of Ming shi (The history of Ming ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Treatises on Smallpox Disease
This copy, in three juan, two volumes, is a work on smallpox written during the Ming dynasty (1368–1644). Chinese medicine underwent great development in many areas at that time, including in the diagnosis of diseases, case-writing formats, compilation and dissemination of medical treatises, discussion of medical theories and ethics, and research on medical history in China. Already in the early Ming period infectious and non-infectious diseases were identified and given precise descriptions and treatments. Besides plague, smallpox was the great pestilence of this period, and the widespread use of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Story of Pei Du, Who Returned the Belt He Had Found at the Fragrant Hill
This work is based on a play by the notable Yuan dynasty playwright, Guan Hanqing (circa 1225–1302), Shan shen miao Pei Du huan dai (Pei Du returned the belt at the Temple of Mountain Deity). Ming dynasty playwright Shen Cai revised the story under the title Xin kan chong ding chu xiang fu shi biao zhu Pei Du Xiangshan huan dai ji (The story of Pei Du, who returned the belt he had found at the fragrant hill). Shen’s play follows the Yuan poetic drama format, called si ...
Contributed by National Central Library