26 results in English
The Complete World Map
The author of this work is unknown. The name of the person who copied the manuscript appears at the end of the work, signed Zhou Yousheng. Some have attributed authorship to Ai Nanying (1583–1646), a late-Ming essayist and literary critic, who wrote a work entitled Yu Gong tu zhu (Explanatory text to the map of the Yu Gong), the central concept of which was the traditional Chinese view on geography. According to that view, Yu of the Xia dynasty (circa 2070–circa 1600 BC) divided the Middle Kingdom into ...
Contributed by National Central Library
The Administrative Maps of the Ming Dynasty (Incomplete Copy)
The author of this work was Chen Zushou (died 1637), a late-Ming literary author. A native of Yanling (present-day Changzhou, Jiangsu Province), Chen Zushou received his jin shi degree in 1634 and became, in the following year, an official at the Bureau of Operations, one of the four bureaus in the Ministry of War. In 1636, while working at the ministry, he wrote this book, based on a large number of earlier works and contemporary local records, including maps. The original edition, very rich in content, had three juan in ...
Contributed by National Central Library
The Tale of Kiều
Truyện Kiều (The tale of Kiều), written by Nguyễn Du (1765−1820) is regarded as the most significant poem in Vietnamese literature. It was composed in Lục-bát (6-8) stanzas and its original title in Vietnamese is Ðoạn Trường Tân Thanh (A new cry from a broken heart). However, it is better known as Truyện Kiều or Kim Văn Kiều. The story is based on a 17th century Ming Chinese novel, which Nguyễn Du discovered while he was on an ambassadorial mission to China in 1813. The plot portrays the chaotic ...
Contributed by The British Library
A Campaign in Tonkin
Une campagne au Tonkin (A campaign in Tonkin) is a first-hand account of the military campaign mounted by France in 1883−86 in order to establish a protectorate over Tonkin (northern Vietnam). The author, Charles-Edouard Hocquard (1853−1911), was a military doctor who sailed with a French battalion from Toulon in January 1884. He arrived in the Gulf of Tonkin the following month and immediately proceeded to Hanoi by way of Haiphong. Hocquard’s book recounts important engagements in the campaign, including the capture of Bắc Ninh and the bombardment ...
Historical and Archaeological Study of Cổ-Loa, the Capital of the Old Kingdom of Âu Lạc, from 255–207 BC
Étude historique et archéologique sur Cổ-Loa, capitale de l’ancien royaume de Âu Lạc, 255-207 avant J.-C. (Historical and archaeological study of Cổ-Loa, the capital of the old kingdom of Âu Lạc, from 255–207 BC) was published in 1893, several decades after the French had established their colonial presence in Vietnam. The book documents findings from the mission directed by Gustave Dumoutier (1850−1904) to explore the archaeological sites at Cổ-Loa. Located some 20 kilometers north of present-day Hanoi, this was the ancient capital of Âu Lạc, the ...
Exploratory Expedition through Indochina
Voyage d’exploration en Indo-Chine (Exploratory expedition through Indochina) is an edited and annotated reprint of the account of the Mekong expedition of 1867−68, first published in 1870 in the French geographic weekly Le Tour du Monde. The book is by Francis Garnier (1839−73), the young naval officer who is credited with proposing and being the driving force behind the expedition, which was commanded by a more senior naval officer, Captain Ernest Doudart De Lagrée (1823−68). Garnier was responsible for mapping the river and reporting on its ...
Annamite Bibliography
Bibliographie annamite (Annamite bibliography) is a bibliography of books, periodical articles, manuscripts, and maps from or about Vietnam, going back to the arrival of the first French priest in the country in the 17th century. It lists 470 items, including works in French, English, German, Portuguese, Spanish, and Italian. The bibliography is organized in five parts. Part one lists books and articles published in major journals. Part two is a compilation of documents published in specialized journals, compendia of voyages, collections of letters by missionaries, and other works. Part three ...
An Nam Unification Records
This work consists of eyewitness accounts of events that took place in Vietnam between 1767 and 1804. Evidence points to a high-ranking court official, Ngo Thoi Nham (also called Ngo Thi Nham, 1746–1803) as the author of the first seven chapters. Another contributing author is thought to be Ngo Thoi Chi, a court official who accompanied the last Lê king, Lê Chiêu Thó̂ng, into exile in Beijing where the king died in 1793. The original title of the work was Hoàng Lê Nhất Thống Chí (The royal Lê ...
The Tale of Kiều
This is a manuscript of Truyện Kiều (also known as Kim Văn Kiều; The tale of Kiều) by Nguyễn Du (1765−1820), perhaps the most important poem in Vietnamese literature. It is written in Chữ Nôm (Sino-Vietnamese characters). The story is based on a 17th-century Ming Chinese novel, which Nguyễn Du read while he traveled to China in 1813. The plot portrays the chaotic political and social circumstances of Vietnam in the 18th century, which was beset by dynastic struggles. The theme of the story is filial devotion, one of ...
Mechanics and Crafts of the People of Annam
Henri J. Oger was a colonial administrator in French Indochina with a deep admiration for the people and culture of Vietnam, or Annam, as the French then called it. In 1908−9 he commissioned artists and wood carvers to visit the 36 streets of Hanoi and the surrounding countryside in order to document the material culture, methods of production, and cultural practices of the common people. The artists sketched 4,200 scenes and produced wood engravings from which prints were made. Oger assembled the prints to create the multivolume Technique ...
French Indochina Today. Volume 2: Tonkin-Annam
L’Indo-Chine française contemporaine (French Indochina today) is a comprehensive study of French Indochina, a second edition of which was published in Paris in 1885. The work is in two volumes, each with two parts, covering what at that time were the four regions of French Indochina: Cochinchina (the extreme southern part of present-day Vietnam), Cambodia, Tonkin (the northern part of Vietnam), and Annam (central and southern Vietnam except for the area occupied by Cochinchina). Presented here is volume two, which is devoted to the Protectorate of Tonkin (part III ...
Newly Inscribed Medical Understandings of the Medical Master Hải Thượng. Introductory Volume
Shown here is the introductory volume to an extensive set of medical, philosophical, and literary writings by the famous physician Lê Hữu Trác (commonly known as Hải Thượng Lãn Ông, 1720–91). The full set includes 61 volumes, plus this head volume or introductory volume, and an end or addendum volume. The set also includes two prefaces: one by Hải Thượng, the author, written in the year 1770, the other by Lê Cúc Linh. In this volume, there is one article on common rules and conventions used in the series ...
Khủn Tinh Poems
This work is among the most important written representations of the folklore of the Thai, or Tay, people in Vietnam, an ethnic group that once lived in southwest China, northeast Thailand, and Burma. Thai people migrated south about 1,000 years ago to escape from the Chinese, and in the present day constitute one of the largest minorities in Vietnam. The written language of Vietnamese Thai people has passed from use, although the spoken form is a dialect understandable by other Thai speakers. This book is a novel written in ...
Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Competition Drawing
The Vietnam Veterans Memorial, originally designed as a student project by Maya Lin for her degree at Yale University Architectural School, has become a profound national symbol and a seminal piece of American monumental architecture. Undertaken to heal a nation torn apart by the controversial war, the competition attracted proposals from thousands of veterans and architects. Lin envisioned a black granite wall, in the shape of a V, on which the names of the American military dead and missing would be inscribed. The architect hoped that "these names, seemingly infinite ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Comprehensive Map of Vietnam’s Provinces
This undated brush and ink manuscript map of Vietnam during the 19th century combines features of the traditional cartography practiced in both China and Vietnam with some Western elements. The place names and a text block in the lower right-hand corner are in classical Chinese calligraphy, the writing system used by both Chinese and Vietnamese scholar-officials. Traditional elements include its pictorial style (mountains, trees, and structures such as the border gate between Vietnam and China), lack of precise scale, and emphasis on mountains and water. A large number of mountains ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Colonization of Indochina
La colonisation de l’Indo-Chine: L’Expérience anglaise (The colonization of Indochina: the English experience) is an 1892 case study of the British colonial experience in Asia and its lessons for France in the administration of French Indochina (present-day Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam). The author, influential French essayist and colonial theorist Joseph Chailley-Bert (1854–1928), was a passionate advocate of reforming France’s colonization practices and governing strategies, which he argued were deficient in both design and execution, and of the need to draw upon the successful experiences of the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
A Voyage in the Indian Ocean and to Bengal, undertaken in the Years 1789 and 1790: Containing an Account of the Sechelles Islands and Trincomale
Louis de Grandpré was a French army officer who made an extensive tour of the Indian Ocean region in 1789-90. This account of his voyage is an English translation of the original French version, which was published in Paris in 1801 under the title Voyage dans l’Inde et au Bengale fait dans les années 1789 et 1790, contenant la description des îles Séchelles et de Trinquemaly. Grandpré began his voyage in the French-controlled Île de France (Isle of France), as Mauritius was called, passed by the Maldives, and visited ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
A Voyage Round the World, Including an Embassy to Muscat and Siam in 1835, 1836, and 1837
In 1832, U.S. president Andrew Jackson, acting on the advice of Secretary of the Navy Levi Woodbury, dispatched Edmund Roberts as a “special agent of the government,” empowered to negotiate treaties of amity and commerce with countries in Asia. The objective was to expand trade between these countries and the United States. Between early 1832 and May 1834, Roberts circumnavigated the globe. In the course of his journey, he negotiated treaties with the Sultan of Muscat (Oman) and the King of Siam (Thailand). Following his return to the United ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Indochina
This brochure, in English and French, was intended for tourists to French Indo-China. It extols the virtues of the region and its people, and includes a brief history and description of the country, followed by detailed maps and photographs of famous sites. Also included are a proposed itinerary and information about transportation, lodging, and prices. The brochure was produced by the Touring Club de France (Touring Club of France), a civic organization established in 1890 to promote tourism in France and later, in its colonies. The club published hotel and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Map of the Kingdoms of Siam, Tunquin, Pegu, Ava Aracan
Jacques Bellin (1703-72) was a prolific cartographer attached to the French Marine Office. His sea atlases reflected the careful mapping of bays, seas, and harbors that characterized 18th-century French naval cartography. In 1764, he published Le Petit Atlas Maritime (Small maritime atlas), a work in five volumes, containing 581 maps. This map, from the third volume of the atlas, shows the kingdoms of southeast Asia as they appeared in the mid-18th century, including Ava and Pegu (present-day Burma), Siam (Thailand), Cambodia, and Tonkin (part of present-day Vietnam). Also shown are ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Map of Indochina
This map of Indochina, published under the auspices of the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Colonies, was compiled by Pierre-Paul Cupet (1859-1907), Jean-Baptiste Friquegnon (1858-1934), and Joseph de Malglaive (1862-1914), all officers in the French Army and members of the Pavie Mission. Auguste Pavie (1847-1925) was a French naval officer, explorer, and colonial administrator who, between 1879 and 1895, led a series of expeditions in Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, and southern China. These expeditions undertook cartographic surveys and ethnographic studies, producing a large body of maps, photographs, and written documentation ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Map of Eastern Indochina
This 1881 map of eastern Indochina is by Jules Léon Dutreuil de Rhins (1846-94), a French naval officer, explorer, and geographer. Dutreuil de Rhins led an adventurous life that took him to Mexico, the Congo, Indochina, and Central Asia. In 1876-77, he commanded a ship in the navy of the King of Annam, and in 1879 published a book entitled Le royaume d’Annam et les Annamites (The kingdom of Annam and the Annamites). Dutreuil de Rhins is best known for his expeditions to Central Asia and Tibet, where he ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Elderly Man Watching Two Young Boys Holding Another Young Boy Down on a Mat While Standing Man Reads Scroll
This photograph of a scene in Vietnam is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and film negatives ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Group of Children, with Baskets, Posed under Palm Tree
This photograph of a scene in Saigon (present-day Ho Chi Minh City), Vietnam is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Group of Ten Workers Posed by Palm Trees
This photograph taken in Saigon (present-day Ho Chi Minh City), Vietnam is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Embassy to the Eastern Courts of Cochin-China, Siam, and Muscat
In 1832 U.S. president Andrew Jackson, acting on the advice of Secretary of the Navy Levi Woodbury, dispatched Edmund Roberts as a “special agent of the government,” empowered to negotiate treaties of amity and commerce with countries in Asia. The objective was to expand trade between these countries and the United States. Between early 1832 and May 1834, Roberts circumnavigated the globe in the U.S. Navy sloop Peacock. In the course of his journey, he negotiated agreements with the sultan of Muscat (Oman) and the king of Siam ...
Contributed by Library of Congress