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21 results
Memoirs of an Arabian Princess: An Autobiography
Emilie Ruete (1844–1924), also known as Princess Sayyida Salme of Zanzibar and Oman, was born in Zanzibar (part of present-day Tanzania), the daughter of Saʻīd bin Sulṭān, sultan of Zanzibar and Oman. In 1867 she married a German merchant, Rudolph Heinrich Ruete (1839–70). The couple settled in Hamburg. Memoirs of an Arabian Princess is an account of Ruete’s royal youth in Zanzibar and Oman. First published in German in 1886, the book describes the culture and society of Zanzibar as experienced by an Arab girl growing to ...
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Library of Congress
The Uganda Journal, Volume I, Number 1, January 1934
The Uganda Literary and Scientific Society was established at Entebbe, Uganda Protectorate, in 1923. Its main activity consisted of the reading of papers and the delivery of lectures on topics relating to Uganda. In 1933 the society moved its headquarters to Kampala and decided to issue a regular publication, The Uganda Journal. The journal’s declared aim was “to collect and publish information which may add to our knowledge of Uganda and to record that which in the course of time might be lost.” Four issues per year were published ...
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National Library of Uganda
Germany and Its Colonies: Travels through the Empire and Its Overseas Possessions, with the Collaboration of Arthur Achleitner, Johannes Biernatzki, et al.
This 538-page work with its 1,367 illustrations reflects German national pride in the early 20th century, a period of rapid economic growth and scientific and cultural achievement in the German Empire. Most of the book deals with Germany proper, which at that time included Alsace-Lorraine, conquered from France in the Franco-Prussian War of 1870-71. A concluding chapter is devoted to Germany’s overseas empire, which had grown rapidly since the achievement of national unity in 1871. Germany’s colonies included Togo, Cameroon, German South-West Africa (present-day Namibia), German East ...
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Library of Congress
German East Africa as a Settlement Region for Europeans, Taking into Consideration British East Africa and Nyassaland
As imperial Germany began creating an overseas empire in the late 19th century, many influential Germans sought to emulate the example of Great Britain, which had built its large and powerful empire in part by promoting the settlement of immigrants from the British Isles to British-controlled territories in other parts of the world, including East Africa and South Africa. Germany declared a protectorate in East Africa in 1885 and established the colony of German East Africa (present-day Tanzania, Rwanda, and Burundi) in 1891. In 1908, Friedrich von Lindequist, undersecretary in ...
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Library of Congress
The Victoria Nyanza. The Land, the Races and their Customs, with Specimens of Some of the Dialects
Lake Victoria (in the Bantu language, Victoria Nyanza), is the largest lake in Africa and the second largest body of fresh water in the world, surpassed only by Lake Superior in North America. The lake is crossed by the equator, and is the chief source of the Nile River. The first European to reach the lake was the British explorer John Hanning Speke in 1858, who named it after Britain’s Queen Victoria. In 1890, at the height of the European scramble for colonies in Africa, Britain and Germany divided ...
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Library of Congress
Explorations in Africa, By Dr. David Livingstone, and Others, Giving a Full Account of the Stanley-Livingstone Expedition of Search, under the Patronage of the New York Herald, as Furnished by Dr. Livingstone and Mr. Stanley
David Livingstone (1813-73) was a Scottish missionary and medical doctor who explored much of the interior of Africa. In a remarkable journey in 1853-56, he became the first European to cross the African continent. Starting on the Zambezi River, he traveled north and west across Angola to reach the Atlantic at Luanda. On his return journey he followed the Zambezi to its mouth on the Indian Ocean in present-day Mozambique. Livingstone’s most famous expedition was in 1866-73, when he explored central Africa in an attempt to find the source ...
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Library of Congress
The Last Journals of David Livingstone, in Central Africa. From Eighteen Hundred and Sixty-five to his Death. Continued by a Narrative of his Last Moments and Sufferings, Obtained from his Faithful Servants, Chuma and Susi, by Horace Waller, F.R.G.S., Rector of Twywell, Northhampton
David Livingstone (1813–73) was a Scottish missionary and medical doctor who explored much of the interior of Africa. Livingstone’s most famous expedition was in 1866–73, when he traversed much of central Africa in an attempt to find the source of the Nile. This book contains the daily journals that Livingstone kept on this expedition, from his first entry on January 28, 1866, when he arrived at Zanzibar (in present-day Tanzania), to his last on April 27, 1873, four days before he died from malaria and dysentery in ...
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Library of Congress
Tanganyika: Eleven Years in Central Africa
This book is an account of the Central African Mission of 1877–88 to Ujiji by Edward C. Hore, a British master mariner who was one of the six original members of the mission. In 1876-77 the London Missionary Society decided to establish the mission, which left Zanzibar for Ujiji on July 21, 1877. Ujiji is a town in the eastern part of present-day Tanzania, but also the designation for the surrounding region, defined by Hore as “a large tribal territory, bordered west and south by the Tanganyika Lake, north ...
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Library of Congress
The Tanganyika Territory (Formerly German East Africa), Characteristics and Potentialities
When war broke out in Europe in 1914, the fighting quickly extended to the colonial possessions of the European powers. In 1916 British forces operating from South Africa set out to conquer German East Africa (present-day Tanzania, Burundi, and Rwanda). They were assisted by Belgian and Congolese troops operating from the Belgian Congo. The allies never subdued the German army led by Colonel (later General) Paul Emil von Lettow-Vorbeck, but they captured the German rail line and occupied much of the territory of German East Africa. At the conclusion of ...
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Library of Congress
A Voyage Round the World, Including an Embassy to Muscat and Siam in 1835, 1836, and 1837
In 1832, U.S. president Andrew Jackson, acting on the advice of Secretary of the Navy Levi Woodbury, dispatched Edmund Roberts as a “special agent of the government,” empowered to negotiate treaties of amity and commerce with countries in Asia. The objective was to expand trade between these countries and the United States. Between early 1832 and May 1834, Roberts circumnavigated the globe. In the course of his journey, he negotiated treaties with the Sultan of Muscat (Oman) and the King of Siam (Thailand). Following his return to the United ...
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Library of Congress
Sketch of Equatorial Africa: Containing the Latest Information Collected by Agents of the International Society of the Congo
The Association Internationale du Congo (International Association of the Congo) was an organization established by King Leopold II of Belgium to lay the basis for creation of a central African colony. Between 1879 and 1884, Leopold employed the explorer Henry M. Stanley to acquire from local chiefs, by means of treaties they did not understand or were coerced into signing, tracts of land along the Congo River and its tributaries. The association also established posts along the river. At an international congress in Berlin that convened on November 15, 1884 ...
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Library of Congress
A Map of the Great Forest Region, Showing the Routes of the Emin Pasha Relief Expedition, from the River Congo to the Victoria Nyanza
After his successful search for David Livingstone in 1871-72, the journalist Henry M. Stanley went on to become a celebrated African explorer in his own right. He led two further expeditions, an Anglo-American expedition in 1874-77, in which he explored the lakes of central Africa, and a relief expedition in 1887-90, ostensibly to rescue Emin Pasha (1840-92). Emin, a German explorer whose original name was Eduard Schnitzler, was the governor of Equatoria, the southernmost district of the Sudan, then ruled by Egypt. He was cut off from the outside world ...
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Library of Congress
British Propaganda Poster Intended for Chinese Muslim Audience
This rare World War I poster, issued by the British in China, was intended to discredit Germany among Chinese Muslims. It shows a portrait of German Imperial Governor Heinrich Schnee and a copy of a letter by him, written in German, directing the suppression of Islam in Africa. The poster also shows two photographs of Fort Moshi (in present-day Tanzania; at that time, German East Africa) where the letter was said to have been found by the British. The Chinese text of the poster explains the anti-Islamic activities of the ...
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Library of Congress
Africa—Tanganyika—Dar es Salaam—Women Convicts Working on Road
This photograph of a scene in Tanganyika (present-day Tanzania) is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and ...
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Library of Congress
East African Official for Germany, Formerly a Sultan, Tanganyika, Africa
This photograph of an official in Tanganyika (present-day Tanzania) is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and ...
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Library of Congress
Sultan’s Palace, Zanzibar, Exterior
This photograph is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and film negatives. According to Carpenter's New ...
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Library of Congress
Natives with Ivory Tusks, Dar Es Salaam, Tanganyika
This photograph of a scene in Dar es Salaam, Tanganyika (present-day Tanzania) is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7 ...
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Library of Congress
Ecclesia Anglicana: For What Does She Stand?
Frank Weston (1871–1924) was an Anglican clergyman who served as bishop of Zanzibar (present-day Tanzania) in 1908–24. He was a staunch Anglo-Catholic, meaning he belonged to the wing of the Anglican Church that emphasized the church’s continuity with its Roman Catholic heritage rather than its Protestant identity. Weston became involved in the bitter Kikuyu controversy of 1913–14, which arose from a 1913 conference in Kikuyu (present-day Kenya), British East Africa, where Anglicans, Methodists, and Presbyterians agreed to federate in response to a perceived threat from non-Christian ...
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National Library of Uganda
Steps towards Reunion: A Statement for the Consultative Committee
At a conference in Kikuyu (present-day Kenya) in 1913, British missionaries from the Anglican, Methodist, and Presbyterian churches agreed to a Scheme of Federation to help them compete with non-Christian groups in Africa and to avoid transplanting the “unhappy divisions” among the churches of Britain to the mission field. The conference gave rise to a bitter controversy within the Anglican Church. Frank Weston, bishop of Zanzibar (present-day Tanzania), objected to federation with the other churches. He accused two of the leading Anglicans involved in the conference, William George Peel, bishop ...
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National Library of Uganda
The Case against Kikuyu: A Study in Vital Principles
Frank Weston (1871–1924) was an Anglican clergyman who served as bishop of Zanzibar (present-day Tanzania) in 1908–24. He was a staunch Anglo-Catholic, meaning he belonged to the wing of the Anglican Church that emphasized the church’s continuity with its Roman Catholic heritage rather than its Protestant identity. Weston became involved in the bitter Kikuyu controversy of 1913–14, which arose from a 1913 conference in Kikuyu (present-day Kenya), British East Africa, where Anglicans, Methodists, and Presbyterians agreed to federate in response to a perceived threat from non-Christian ...
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National Library of Uganda
Kikuyu
At a conference in Kikuyu (present-day Kenya) in 1913, British missionaries from the Anglican, Methodist, and Presbyterian churches agreed to a Scheme of Federation to help them compete with non-Christian groups in Africa and to avoid transplanting the “unhappy divisions” among the churches of Britain to the mission field. The conference gave rise to a bitter controversy within the Anglican Church. Frank Weston, bishop of Zanzibar (present-day Tanzania), objected to federation with the other churches. He accused the leading Anglicans involved in the conference, William George Peel, bishop of Mombasa ...
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National Library of Uganda