22 results in English
The Compendium of Graces and Fountain of Charms
This 17th-century manuscript contains the text of Majmoo’a al-Latā’if wa-Yanbu‘ al-Zarā’if (The compendium of graces and fountain of charms), a collection of esoteric and mystic prayers. The work is divided into many chapters, unnumbered and typically only a few pages long, with rubrications indicating the beginning of each chapter. The work discusses the spiritual expediency of praying in a certain manner; on a certain Islamic month, day of the week, or religious occasion, citing sayings of the Prophet Muhammad and other Islamic tradition as supporting arguments. The ...
Complete Book on the Judgment of the Stars
This book is a Latin translation of Ibn al-Rijāl Abū al-Ḥasan al-Shaybānī al-Maghribī al-Qayrawānī’s principal scientific work, Kitāb al-bāriʻ fī aḥkām al-nujūm (Complete book on the judgment of the stars). Known in the Latin West as Haly Abenragel, or Haly Albohazen, Ibn al-Rijāl was the astrologer and leading official at the court of the Zīrid prince Muʻizz ibn Bādīs (1007 or 1008–62) at Qayrawān (present-day Kairouan, Tunisia). Kitāb al-bāriʻ consists of eight books covering several different types of astrology. These include interrogations, nativities, the discussions of the ...
Contributed by Qatar National Library
The Pillar Regarding Creation and Critique of Poetry
This book is a printed edition of Al-‘Umdah fi Sina’at al-Shi’r wa-Naqdih (The pillar regarding creation and critique of poetry), a foundational text of Arabic literary criticism. The author, Ibn Rashīq al-Qayrawānī, covers poetic history and prosody up to his lifetime in 11th century Qayrawān, the center of intellectual life in Tunisia, then called Al-Ifriqiya. The work is universally known as Ibn Rashiq’s Al-‘Umdah (The pillar). It is also cited as Al-‘Umdah fī maḥāsin al-shiʻr wa-ādābih. Scholarly judgment of Al-‘Umdah holds that although ...
Contributed by Qatar National Library
Middle East Air Traffic Control Scheme
This map, produced in 1946 by the Survey of Egypt, shows a scheme for air traffic control in the Middle East. The International Convention on Civil Aviation, adopted by 52 countries in 1944, provided for the establishment of an international air-traffic control system aimed at preventing aircraft collisions. The world’s airspace was to be divided into contiguous regions, within each of which all traffic would be controlled by a designated air-traffic control authority. On longer flights, aircraft are passed by radio from the control of one region to another ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Two Jewish Women Standing, Facing Each Other, in Tunisia
This photograph taken in early 20th-century Tunisia is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855-1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890-1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and film negatives. This photograph ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Cathedral, Carthage, Tunisia
This photochrome print of the Cathedral of Saint Louis, in Carthage, is part of “Views of Architecture and People in Tunisia” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. The cathedral was built in 1884-90 and named after Louis IX, a French king who died in the siege of Tunis in 1270. At the time of construction, Tunisia was a French protectorate. The church was built on Byrsa Hill, the castle hill of the ancient city of Carthage. Under a 1964 agreement between the Vatican and the Republic of Tunisia ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Private Drawing Room, I, Kasr-el-Said, Tunisia
This photochrome print is part of “Views of Architecture and People in Tunisia” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It shows a private drawing room in the Kassar-Said Palace in Tunis. Baedeker’s The Mediterranean: Handbook for Travelers (1911) described the palace as “a château of the bey” to which admittance by tourists was not allowed. “Here, in 1881, was concluded the Bardo Treaty, which ended the independence of Tunisia.” Tunisia came under the control of the Ottoman Empire in 1574. Bey was originally the title of the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Bedchamber of the Late Bey of Tunis, Kasr-el-Said, Tunisia
This photochrome print, from circa 1899, is part of “Views of Architecture and People in Tunisia” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It shows the chamber of the bey of Tunis in the Kassar-Said Palace in Tunis. Baedeker’s The Mediterranean: Handbook for Travelers (1911) described the palace as “a château of the bey” to which admittance by tourists was not allowed. Muhammad III as-Sadiq (1813–82) ruled Tunisia from September 1859 until his death in October 1882. He was succeeded by Ali Muddat ibn al-Husayn (1817–1902 ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Sousse, Tunisia
This photochrome print from around 1899 is from “Views of Architecture and People in Tunisia” in the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It depicts the seaside town of Sousse, Tunisia, which, according to Baedeker’s The Mediterranean: Handbook for Travelers (1911), followed Tunis and Sfax as the third most important seaport in Tunisia. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H. Husher. They obtained the exclusive rights ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
General View from Paris Hotel, Tunis, Tunisia
This photochrome print from around 1899 is from “Views of Architecture and People in Tunisia” in the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It depicts the rooftops of the city of Tunis as seen from the Paris Hotel. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H. Husher. They obtained the exclusive rights to use the Swiss "Photochrom" process for converting black-and-white photographs into color images and printing them ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Mosque of St. Catherine, Tunis, Tunisia
This photochrome print from around 1899 is from “Views of Architecture and People in Tunisia” in the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It depicts the Mosque of Youssef Sahib at-Taba'a (sometimes called the Halfouine Mosque), in Place Halfouine, Tunis. Construction of the mosque began in 1812 but was not completed until 1970. It is described by Baedeker’s The Mediterranean: Handbook for Travelers (1911) as being “founded on blocks of stone from Carthage.” The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Souc-el-Trouk, Tunis, Tunisia
This photochrome print from around 1899 is from “Views of Architecture and People in Tunisia” in the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It depicts the Souc-el-Trouk, or bazaar, in the city of Tunis. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H. Husher. They obtained the exclusive rights to use the Swiss "Photochrom" process for converting black-and-white photographs into color images and printing them by photolithography. This process ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Sadiky Hospital, Tunis, Tunisia
This photochrome print from around 1899 is from “Views of Architecture and People in Tunisia” in the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. It depicts the Sadiky Hospital in the city of Tunis. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H. Husher. They obtained the exclusive rights to use the Swiss "Photochrom" process for converting black-and-white photographs into color images and printing them by photolithography. This process permitted ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Bardo, Tribunal Chamber, Tunis, Tunisia
This photochrome print of the tribunal chamber in the Bardo Palace in Tunis is part of “Views of Architecture and People in Tunisia” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. Baedeker’s The Mediterranean: Handbook for Travellers (1911) informed its readers that the Bardo, located in the fertile plain to the west of Tunis, was a 13th- century palace that was “the former winter-residence of the beys.” It once “formed a little town by itself” and housed “a treasury, a mosque, baths, barracks, and a prison.” This photo shows ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Procession, Kairwan, Tunisia
This photochrome print of a procession in Kairwan, Tunisia, is part of “Views of Architecture and People in Tunisia” in the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. Kairwan was once the political and religious center of Tunisia and was considered the country's holiest city. In his 1908 book Tunis, Kairouan & Carthage: Described and Illustrated by Forty-Eight Paintings, the British artist and author Graham Petrie (1859–1940) declared that "it is the absolute duty of every visitor to Tunis to make a pilgrimage to the holy city of Kairouan," which ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
For Your Country. Subscribe to the Loan. Crédit Foncier d'Algérie et de Tunisie
This World War I poster, sponsored by the Crédit Foncier d'Algérie et de Tunisie, a financial institution serving Algeria and Tunisia, urges people to subscribe to the fourth national loan, issued by the French government in 1918. The poster shows Algerian and Tunisian soldiers on horses charging into battle. France recruited troops from its overseas territories and colonies, and between 1914 and 1918, the French army deployed 172,800 soldiers from Algeria and 60,000 soldiers from Tunisia to Europe. Initially, most colonial troops were volunteers, but as the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
For the Return, Subscribe. 4th National Loan. Crédit Foncier d'Algérie et de Tunisie
This World War I poster, sponsored by the Crédit Foncier d'Algérie et de Tunisie, a financial institution serving Algeria and Tunisia, urges people to subscribe to the fourth national loan, issued by the French government in 1918. The poster shows a ship steaming into the beautiful harbor of Algiers, with Algerian women and children overlooking the harbor and as they await the return of their husbands, fathers, and brothers. The poster implies that victory in the war and the return of the men to Algeria will be hastened by ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Young Jewish Girls. Tunis
This photograph of two Jewish girls on a beach in Tunis, Tunisia is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7 ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
The Qur’an
This manuscript is a fragment of the Qur'an, consisting of chapters 19 (Sūrat Maryam) through 23 (Sūrat al-mu’minūn). It was produced in the Maghreb and dates from the 12th century AH (18th century AD). The text is written in a large Maghrebī script, with vocalization in red, green, and yellow ink on Italian paper. The codex opens with an illuminated chapter heading for chapter 19 written in the New Abbasid (broken cursive) style (folio 1b) in gold ink within a decorative headpiece. The titles of other chapters are ...
Contributed by Walters Art Museum
Complete Book on the Judgment of the Stars
Abu al-Hassan Ali Ibn Ali Ibn Abi al-Rijal (also known as Haly or Hali, and by the Latinized versions of his name, Haly Albohazen and Haly Abenragel) was a late 10th-century–early 11th century Arab astrologer and astronomer who served as court astrologer in the palace of the Tunisian prince, al-Muizz Ibn Badis. His best known treatise, Kitāb al-bāri' fi ahkām an-nujūm (Complete book on the judgment of the stars), was one of the works translated by the team of Christian, Jewish, and Muslim scholars that King Alfonso X of ...
Contributed by Qatar National Library
Ibn Khaldoun
Abū Zayd ‘Abdu r-Rahman bin Muhammad bin Khaldūn Al-Hadrami (also known as Ibn Khaldun or Ibn Khaldoun, 1332–1406 AD) was an Arab historiographer and historian. He was born in Tunisia but also lived in Andalusia and Egypt. He is considered the greatest social scientist of his time. His name is closely tied to his major work al-Muqaddima (also known by its Greek title, Prolegomenon), the first volume of a seven-volume universal history. The eminent British historian Arnold Toynbee (1889–1975), himself the author of a 12-volume study of the ...
Contributed by Bibliotheca Alexandrina
Complete Book on the Judgment of the Stars
Abu al-Hassan Ali Ibn Ali Ibn Abi al-Rijal (also known as Haly or Hali, and by the Latinized versions of his name, Haly Albohazen and Haly Abenragel) was a late 10th-century–early 11th-century Arab astrologer and astronomer who served as court astrologer in the palace of the Tunisian prince, al-Muizz Ibn Badis. His best-known treatise, Kitāb al-bāri' fi ahkām an-nujūm (Complete book on the judgment of the stars), was one of the works translated by the team of Christian, Jewish, and Muslim scholars that King Alfonso X of Castile (reigned ...
Contributed by Qatar National Library