26 results in English
Inter-American Highway
The Inter-American Highway is the portion of the Pan-American Highway system that runs from Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, to Panama City, Panama, a total of 5,390 kilometers. The First Pan American Congress of Highways took place in October 1925 in Buenos Aires, Argentina, under the auspices of the Pan American Union. The congress was followed by a program of surveys and further meetings to discuss development of an inter-American highway system. In October 1929, representatives of the Central American countries, Mexico, and the United States met in Panama to establish ...
Map of the Republic of Colombia
This 1891 map of Colombia depicts the main physical features and administrative divisions of the country. It shows national and departmental borders, the capitals of departments, other cities, villages, railroads (completed and projected), and highways. Present-day Panama, which did not become independent until 1903, is still shown as a department of Colombia. The railroad across the Isthmus of Panama, from Colón to Panama City, is indicated, but the Panama Canal has not yet been built. The eastern part of the country is shown as thinly settled and not well mapped ...
West India Islands and the Approaches to the Panama Canal
This large folding map, issued by the London Geographical Institute during World War I, shows the islands of the Caribbean Sea and the approaches to the Panama Canal. The canal had opened to traffic in early 1914, shortly before the outbreak of the war. Protection of the canal against possible sabotage by Germany was a concern of U.S. military planners in World War I and, especially, during World War II. The map shows telegraph lines, undersea cables, and the distances in nautical miles of steamer routes from the key ...
International Canals
In preparation for the peace conference that was expected to follow World War I, in the spring of 1917 the British Foreign Office established a special section responsible for preparing background information for use by British delegates to the conference. International Canals is Number 150 in a series of more than 160 studies produced by the section, most of which were published after the conclusion of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. Written by Edward Arthur Whittuck (1844−1924), a specialist in Roman and international law associated with the University of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
A Syrian Voyage in Central and South America
Father Henri Lammens was born into a Catholic family in Ghent, Belgium, in 1862. At the age of 15 he joined the Jesuits and later settled permanently in Lebanon. He mastered Latin and Greek and taught Arabic in Beirut. His first work was an Arabic dictionary, Farā'id al-lugha (The pearls of language), dating from 1889. He also served as editor for the Jesuit newspaper of Beirut, al-Bashīr (The evangelist). He wrote many works, most notably on the history of Arabia in the pre-Islamic era, as well as on ...
Contributed by Qatar National Library
Portolan Chart of the Pacific Coast from Guatemala to Northern Peru with the Galapagos Islands
Presented here is a detailed Spanish portolan chart on vellum of the Pacific Coast from Guatemala to northern Peru, including the Galapagos Islands. The face of the map, shown first, has a long axis extending east and west and wind roses with fleur-de-lis indicators pointing north. A distance scale at top right is partly torn away; a latitude scale, from 17 degrees north to about nine degrees south, is also damaged. The abundant coastal nomenclature is carefully written, and many coastal features, towns, and settlements are indicated. Stylized architectural drawings ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Panama Canal. Lock Canal Project Map
This large, detailed, and colorful map is from the collection of the Panama Canal Zone Library, which was transferred to the Library of Congress in 1978. This collection contains various maps, plans, and diagrams detailing the history of Panama and the construction of the Panama Canal over the ten-year period of 1904 to 1914. This map shows the line of the planned lock canal with the summit elevations at 85 feet (25.9 meters) and represents the work for the Isthmian Canal Commission by Chief Engineer John Stevens. Stevens oversaw ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Property Map of the Canal Zone Showing Property Belonging to the United States of America, Panama Railroad Company, and Lands Claimed by Private Persons
This large, detailed, map is from the collection of the Panama Canal Zone Library, which was transferred to the Library of Congress in 1978. This collection contains various maps, plans, and diagrams detailing the history of Panama and the construction of the Panama Canal over the ten-year period of 1904 to 1914. According to a note on the map, the “map shows the land in the Canal Zone that has been set apart for all Governmental purposes in the Canal Zone, to date, and whether the land belongs to the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Panoramic View of the Canal of Panama
French mathematician and surveyor Charles Muret made one of the first representations of a projected canal across the isthmus of Panama in about 1881, at the beginning of the French venture to build the canal, which was ultimately unsuccessful. Muret’s plaster cast of the topography of Panama was shown at the 1885 World Exhibition in Antwerp and was awarded a gold medal. Shown here is an engraving of the Muret plan by L. Wuhrer (Louis Charles Wuhrer, flourished 1874−1906). The image shows the ships entering the canal area ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Panama
This map of Panama was published in 1904, the year that construction of the Panama Canal began. The “Profile of the Panama Canal” at the top shows the plan for the canal. In 1881, a French company led by Ferdinand de Lesseps, the builder of the Suez Canal, had begun work on cutting a sea-level channel across the isthmus. The French venture collapsed in 1889 and work was halted. In 1903, the United States and Panama concluded the Hay-Bunau-Varilla Treaty that granted to the United States the right to build ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Panamanian Girl in a Pollera (brightly colored national dress worn for festivals and Carnival)
This photograph shows a Panamanian girl in a pollera, a brightly-colored national dress worn for festivals and carnival, with an elaborately decorated headdress and earrings of a similar pattern. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of life and culture in the Americas. Many of the photographs were taken by prominent photographers on OAS missions to member countries. The OAS was established in April 1948 when 21 countries of the western hemisphere adopted ...
Panama Canal—West Lirio Slide
This 1923 photograph from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress documents a recent landslide in the West Lirio section of the Panama Canal and its effects on eastbound and westbound shipping. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Congressional Party in Convent Ruins, Old Panama, March, 1907
This photograph from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress depicts a scene from a visit to Panama by a delegation of the U.S. Congress in 1907. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
William H. Taft and Colonel Goethals
This photograph from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress shows William Howard Taft (1857–1930) and Colonel George Washington Goethals (1858–1928) on a visit to Panama. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Panama—San Blas—Native Indians at Beach Market
This photograph from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress shows two young Indians selling plantains in a city market in San Blas, Panama. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Emblems of Liberty and Humanity. The Red Cross, Mother of All Nations
This Spanish-language poster is one in a series issued by the American Red Cross during World War I featuring the flags of the countries allied or associated with the United States in the war. This poster shows two Red Cross nurses. One nurse, depicted as a Madonna figure, appears to cradle in her arms a litter used to transport wounded soldiers, between the flags of Panama and the United States. The title reads: “Emblemas de la libertad y de la humanidad. La Cruz Roja, madre de todas las naciones” (Emblems ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Winter in Panama with the U.S. Army
This World War I recruitment poster for the U.S. Army features a drawing of a ship transiting the Panama Canal and photographs of training exercises conducted in Panama. Under a treaty concluded with Panama in 1903, the United States was given permanent control over a zone of land 16 kilometers (10 miles) wide and about 64 kilometers (40 miles) long across the Isthmus of Panama, for the purpose of building, operating, and defending the Panama Canal. This strip of land, known as the Panama Canal Zone, was the site ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Three Men in Boat Transporting Bananas to the City Markets, Panama
This photograph depicting a scene in Panama is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and film negatives ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Pedro Miguel Locks. Auxiliary Crane Dumping Concrete, Panama Canal
This photograph from the George Grantham Bain Collection at the Library of Congress is a scene from the construction of the Panama Canal. The collection contains approximately 40,000 glass plate negatives and 50,000 photographic prints, most dating from the 1900s to the mid-1920s. Bain, who was born in 1865 and died in 1944, founded the New York-based Bain News Service in 1898. Specializing in news about New York City and to a lesser degree the eastern United States, Bain distributed its own pictures, and those purchased from other ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Map of Central America Including the States of Guatemala, Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua and Costa Rica, the Territories of Belise and Mosquito, with Parts of Mexico, Yucatan and New Granada
John Baily was an Englishman who lived for many years in Central America. He was employed in 1837-38 by the government of Nicaragua to survey a potential canal route from the Caribbean Sea to the Pacific Ocean. This map, published in London in 1850, was accompanied by a book, Central America, published separately, which contained much of the detailed information that Baily gathered to make this map. The map shows four possible canal routes: one surveyed for the government of Costa Rica in 1848 by the Danish engineer Andres Oersted ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
William Howard Taft in Panama
This film shows a visit of President William Howard Taft to inspect construction work on the Panama Canal, probably in November 1910. Taft previously had served as secretary of war in the cabinet of President Theodore Roosevelt, where he played a role in the development of the canal and made many visits to Panama. The film shows a crowd of men and women on a dock, posing for the camera. A boat pulls into an unidentified harbor, with Taft and General George W. Goethals, chief engineer of the Panama Canal ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Panama Canal: Scenes of the Finished Canal
This film shows the operation of the Panama Canal in 1919, five years after its completion and opening to ocean-going traffic. The film follows the passage through the canal from the Atlantic to the Pacific by an unidentified ship. The vessel passes by the Panamanian city of Colón on the Atlantic end of the canal and through the channel to Gatun Locks and into Gatún Lake. Views of the Gatun spillway and the Chagres River are shown. From there the ship passes through the Gaillard Cut (Culebra Cut), into the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Theodore Roosevelt Speaking in Panama, November 1906
In November 1906, President Theodore Roosevelt went to Panama to inspect progress on construction of the Panama Canal, the first time a sitting U.S. president had left the United States to visit a foreign country. This film shows the welcoming ceremony for Roosevelt at the cathedral in Panama City. Roosevelt, President Manuel Amador Guerrero of Panama, and two unidentified men are seen arriving and standing on a platform on the steps of the cathedral. There is also a shot of two women arriving at the ceremony, one of whom ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Theodore Roosevelt's Arrival in Panama, November 1906
In November 1906 President Theodore Roosevelt went to Panama to inspect progress on construction of the Panama Canal, the first time a sitting U.S. president had left the United States to visit a foreign country. This film shows the welcoming ceremony for Roosevelt at the cathedral in Panama City. There are views of the processional, including a marching band and escorts on horseback, as spectators gather. Roosevelt, President Manuel Amador Guerrero of Panama, and two unidentified men are seen arriving and standing on a platform on the steps of ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Doctor William Gorgas
This short film consists of views of Dr. William Crawford Gorgas (1854−1920), chief sanitation officer (1904−13) to the Isthmian Canal Commission in Panama. Gorgas is shown standing in front of a building at an undetermined location. The remainder of film shows Gorgas and an unidentified man riding on a Panama Railroad train. The two men are silhouetted against passing scenery of the Canal Zone as Gorgas indicates to the other man points of interest. The train passes a body of water that is probably a part of the ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Vocabulary of the Language Used by the Indians in These Missions
This manuscript, by an unknown author probably writing at one or several Catholic missions in the 18th century, was found at the College for the Propagation of the Faith in Popayán, New Granada (the Spanish viceroyalty that comprised all or parts of present-day Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, and Venezuela). It consists of 103 pages, most of which are taken up by a glossary of words in the Siona indigenous language with their Spanish equivalents. This part of the work is organized in columns, with the Siona words on the left and ...