15 results
Map of the Northern Realms Including the Kingdoms of Denmark, Sweden, Norway
This map of the kingdoms of Denmark, Norway, and Sweden is by the French cartographer Guillaume de L'Isle (1675-1726). The son of a geographer, de L’Isle began working in the field of cartography at a young age. In addition to learning from his father, he studied mathematics and astronomy with the Italian astronomer Giovanni Domenico Cassini (1625-1712). This training led de L’Isle to produce scientifically accurate maps. In 1718, he became the official geographer to the king. De L’Isle’s maps continued the trend in French ...
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National Library of Brazil
Map of Sweden
This map shows the Kingdom of Sweden as it appeared at the end of the 18th century. At the time, the kingdom included present-day Sweden as well as Finland, which, however, was lost to the Russian Empire in 1809. The map is the work of Samuel Gustaf Hermelin (1744-1820), a Swedish industrialist and diplomat who also practiced cartography. Hermelin studied mining at the University of Uppsala before traveling to the United States to study industrialization. While in North America, he was instrumental in establishing diplomatic relations between Sweden and the ...
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National Library of Brazil
New and Precise Map of the Dioceses of Stavanger, Bergen, and Oslo
Johannes Janssonius (1588-1664), or Jan Jansson, was born in Arnhem, the Netherlands, son of a provincial Dutch bookseller and publisher. In 1612 he married into the cartographic Hondius family, which had acquired the plates of the great mapmaker Gerardus Mercator (1512-94) and published an updated atlas bearing Mercator’s name. In the 1630s Jansson formed a partnership with his brother-in-law, Henricus Hondius, and together they published popular updates of the famous Mercator Atlas. After the death of Henricus, Jansson took over the business and expanded the atlas still further, printing ...
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Library of Congress
Maps of Bermuda, Iceland, Jan Mayen Island, and Newfoundland
Vincenzo Coronelli (1650-1718) was one of the most important figures in the history of Western cartography. Although best known for his globes, he also produced numerous maps and atlases. These maps of four North Atlantic islands appear on a single plate in his Corso geografico universale (Course of universal geography), a two-volume work published in 1692. The map of “Iceland” is erroneous, and is based on a claim by the Venetian Nicolò Zeno, later discredited, that around 1380 he undertook a voyage to the northern seas where he found a ...
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Library of Congress
Modern Geographic Table of Geography
Antoine du Pérac Lafréry (1512-77) was a French engraver who settled in Rome, probably in the early 1540s, where he became a celebrated publisher of maps. Lafréry assembled and bound collections of maps from various sources, which he sold under the title Tavole moderne di geografia...di diversi autori raccolte et messe secondo l’ordine di Tolemeo (Modern geographical maps...from various authors, collected and organized according to Ptolemy’s geographical order). This work dates from around 1575, a few years after Abraham Ortelius, working in Antwerp, published the first ...
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Library of Congress
Fish Market, Bergen, Norway
This photochrome print from the “Landscape and Marine Views of Norway” section in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company shows the Bergen fish market as it looked in the last decade of the 19th century. According to the 1892 edition of Baedeker’s Norway, Sweden and Denmark: Handbook for Travellers, “fish has always been the staple commodity of Bergen, which is the greatest fish-mart in Norway. The Hanseatic merchants compelled the northern fishermen to send their fish to Bergen, and to the present day the trade still flows mainly ...
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Library of Congress
Storthings Bygningen, Christiania, Norway
The Storthings Byningen is the hall of the Norwegian parliament, which was completed in 1866. This photomechanical print from the Detroit Publishing Company shows how it appeared in the last decade of the 19th century. Oslo, the present-day capital of Norway, was called Christiania from 1624 to 1878 (Kristiania from 1878 to 1924). It was named after King Christian IV of Denmark, which was part of a Nordic union with Norway for more than 400 years.
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Library of Congress
Oscarshal, Christiania, Norway
According to the 1892 edition of Baedeker’s Norway, Sweden and Denmark, the “château of Oscarshall was erected in the English Gothic style by Nebelong for King Oscar I in 1849-52, and adorned with paintings by eminent Norwegian artists. It was sold to the government by Charles XV, but it is still kept up as a royal residence. It deserves a visit for the sake of its pictures and the view.” This photomechanical print from the Detroit Publishing Company shows how a late 19th-century tourist would have approached ...
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Library of Congress
Norwegian Carriage, Hardanger Fjord, Norway
This photochrome print of a Norwegian girl in a carriage at Hardanger Fjord in Norway is part of “Landscape and Marine Views of Norway” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. In his Peeps at Many Lands: Norway (1909) the British travel writer A.F. Ferryman-Mockler observed that "all that is grand, all that is beautiful, will be found in the Hardanger.” The fjord, located in southern Norway, is approximately five kilometers miles wide at its center and more than 650 meters deep in some places. The fjord is ...
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Library of Congress
Tourist's House, Spitzbergen, Norway
This photochrome print is part of “Landscape and Marine Views of Norway” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. The photo depicts a tourist house on Spitsbergen Island, part of the Svalvard Archipelago, located within the Arctic Circle, some 550 kilometers north of the Norwegian mainland. There were no tourist accommodations on Spitsbergen until around 1896, when the Vesteraalens Steamship Company constructed a tourist house along the coast of Advent Bay to accommodate an influx of visitors. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in ...
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Library of Congress
Ovrelerfos, Trondhjem, Norway
This photochrome print from the “Landscape and Marine Views of Norway” section in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company shows a noted tourist destination in Norway as it would have appeared in the last decade of the 19th century. The Lille (Lower) Lerfos and Store (Upper) Lerfos are picturesque waterfalls on the Nid River, several kilometers south of the city of Trondheim. The 1892 edition of Baedeker’s Norway, Sweden and Denmark: Handbook for Travellers advised that the best view of the falls “is from one of the windows ...
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Library of Congress
A Sami Family, Norway
This photochrome print is part of “Landscape and Marine Views of Norway” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. The photo shows a Sami, or Lapp, family gathered by a pair of traditional conical tents called lavvu, in northern Norway. In his 1876 work Through Norway with a Knapsack, the British scientist and author William Mattieu Williams described the lavvu as "a framework of wooden ribs, all bearing towards each other in the centre," over which animal skin is stretched for insulation. The Sami, the indigenous people of northern ...
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Library of Congress
Map of the Sea
The Carta marina of the Swedish geographer and historian Olaus Magnus is one of the earliest accurate cartographic depictions of the Scandinavian peninsula. Drafted in Rome in 1539, by one of the more prominent Scandinavian Catholics in higher ecclesiastical service, it contains detail that is lacking in many other early maps of the region. Originally intended for his Historia de gentibus septentrionalibus (A description of the Nordic peoples), the map was published some 15 years before the appearance of this majestic work. Olaus Magnus is generally regarded as the first ...
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National Library of Sweden
Fossestuen Hotel, Trondhjem, Norway
This photochrome print of the popular Fossestuen Hotel in Trondheim, Norway is part of “Landscape and Marine Views of Norway” from the catalog of the Detroit Photographic Company. Nestled in the mountains near the lower tier of the Lienfoss waterfalls, the Fossestuen Hotel drew many foreigners to this picturesque region of Norway. Built in 1892, the hotel was actually a restaurant that served dinner and refreshments to tourists. The building reflects the traditional wooden architecture of Norway, with the sod roof a source of insulation against the harsh winter cold ...
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Library of Congress
A Doll's House
Few plays have had as much influence globally on social norms and conditions as A Doll’s House by the Norwegian playwright, Henrik Ibsen (1828–1906). Considered one of the great figures of world literature, Ibsen gave theatrical art a new vitality by bringing into European bourgeois drama an ethical gravity, psychological depth, and social significance that the theater had lacked since the days of William Shakespeare. His plays portray people from the middle class of his day, whose routines are suddenly upset as they confront a deep crisis in ...
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National Library of Norway