14 results
From the West, Cetinje, Montenegro
This late-19th century photochrome print is from “Views of Montenegro” in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts the town of Cetinje, the capital of Montenegro, an independent principality that separated from the Ottoman Empire in 1878. According to Baedeker’s Austria, Including Hungary, Transylvania, Dalmatia, and Bosnia (1900), Cetinje had 3,000 inhabitants at the time. “In some respects the place resembles a little German country town, but it has several distinctive features of its own. It may be seen in an hour, but a whole day ...
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The Convent, Cetinje, Montenegro
This late 19th-century photochrome print is part of “Views of Montenegro” from the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts the Cetinje Monastery at the foot of Mount Lovćen in Cetinje. The monastery was built in 1701 by Bishop–Prince Danilo (1670–1735), the founder of the Petrović Njegoš dynasty, following the destruction by Venetian forces of the medieval Cetinje Monastery, a Serb Orthodox monastery built by Ivan the Black in 1484. The monastery has great historical significance for the Montenegrin people. It contains the remains of Saint Peter ...
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Arrival of the Post, Cetinje, Montenegro
This late-19th century photochrome print is from “Views of Montenegro” in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts a scene from Cetinje, the capital of Montenegro, an independent principality that separated from the Ottoman Empire in 1878. According to Baedeker’s Austria, Including Hungary, Transylvania, Dalmatia, and Bosnia (1900), Cetinje, a town of about 3,000 inhabitants, was a two-day excursion by mountainous road from the town of Catarro (present-day Kotor) on the Adriatic coast. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the ...
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General View, Njegus, Montenegro
This late-19th century photochrome print is from “Views of Montenegro” in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts a view from Njegus, characterized by Baedeker’s Austria, Including Hungary, Transylvania, Dalmatia, and Bosnia (1900) as “the ancestral home of the reigning family and the cradle of the Montenegrin wars of independence.” The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing firm in the late 1890s by Detroit businessman and publisher William A. Livingstone, Jr. and photographer and photo-publisher Edwin H. Husher. They obtained the exclusive rights to ...
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The Inn di Krstac on the Cetinje Road, Njegus, Montenegro
This late-19th century photochrome print is from “Views of Montenegro” in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. Baedeker’s Austria, Including Hungary, Transylvania, Dalmatia, and Bosnia (1900) recommended that European and American travelers of this period take a two-day excursion to Montenegro--from the port city of Catarro (present-day Kotor) to Cetinje, the then-capital of Montenegro. This photochrome print depicts a scene along the road in the town of Njegus, which Baedeker identified as “the ancestral home of the reigning family and the cradle of the Montenegrin wars of independence ...
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General View, Thal von Rieka, Montenegro
This late-19th century photochrome print is from “Views of Montenegro” in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. Baedeker’s Austria, Including Hungary, Transylvania, Dalmatia, and Bosnia (1900) recommended that European and American travelers of this period take a two-day excursion to Montenegro--from the port city of Catarro (present-day Kotor) to Cetinje, the then-capital of Montenegro. This photochrome print shows a scene on the road from Cetinje to the town of Rjeka, noted by Baedeker for its splendid mountain views. The Detroit Photographic Company was launched as a photographic publishing ...
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Serbia Day. June 25, 1916
This World War I poster, published in Paris in 1916, depicts a scene in late 1915 from the Serbian theater of the war, in which the remnants of the Serbian army and accompanying civilian refugees were forced across the borders into Montenegro and Albania. Invading forces from Austria-Hungary and Germany had pushed deep into Serbia, where they occupied the capital city of Belgrade. One of the major engagements of the campaign took place at Kosovo, the scene of a battle in 1389 between a medieval Serbian army and an invading ...
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Serbia Day. June 25, 1916
This World War I poster, published in Paris in 1916, shows a group of Serbian civilians and soldiers as they head into the mountains. When invading forces from Austria-Hungary and Germany pushed into Serbia in 1915, they occupied the capital city of Belgrade, and drove the remnants of the Serbian army and accompanying civilian refugees across the borders into Montenegro and Albania. One of the major engagements of the campaign took place at Kosovo, the scene of a battle in 1389 between a medieval Serbian army and an invading Ottoman ...
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Serbia Day, June 25, 1916. Anniversary of the Battle of Kosovo
This World War I poster, published in Paris in 1916, depicts a scene in late 1915 from the Serbian theater of the war, in which the remnants of the Serbian army and accompanying civilian refugees were forced across the borders into Montenegro and Albania. Invading forces from Austria-Hungary and Germany had pushed into Serbia, where they occupied the capital city of Belgrade. One of the major engagements of the campaign took place at Kosovo, the scene of a battle in 1389 between a medieval Serbian army and an invading Ottoman ...
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Library of Congress
Four Men in Two Row Boats Netting Fish in Montenegro
This photograph of men fishing in Montenegro is from the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection at the Library of Congress. Frank G. Carpenter (1855–1924) was an American writer of books on travel and world geography, whose works helped to popularize cultural anthropology and geography in the United States in the early years of the 20th century. Consisting of photographs taken and gathered by Carpenter and his daughter Frances (1890–1972) to illustrate his writings, the collection includes an estimated 16,800 photographs and 7,000 glass and film negatives ...
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From the East, Cetinje, Montenegro
This late-19th century photochrome print is from “Views of Montenegro” in the catalog of the Detroit Publishing Company. It depicts the town of Cetinje, the then-capital of Montenegro, an independent principality that separated from the Ottoman Empire in 1878. According to Baedeker’s Austria, Including Hungary, Transylvania, Dalmatia, and Bosnia (1900), Cetinje had 3,000 inhabitants at the time. “In some respects the place resembles a little German country town, but it has several distinctive features of its own. It may be seen in an hour, but a whole day ...
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Slavonia, Croatia, Bosnia, and a part of Dalmatia
Gerard Mercator’s 1590 Sclavonia, Croatia, Bosnia cum Dalmatiae parte (Slavonia, Croatia, Bosnia, and a part of Dalmatia) is the best representation of Bosnia made up to that time. One of the oldest items in the cartographic collections of the National and University Library of Bosnia and Herzegovina, the map was published by the well-known Blaeu firm in Amsterdam. Shown are villages, towns, rivers, and mountains. The scale is in German miles. The map is in Latin, but it gives place names in the languages of the region, which include ...
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National and University Library of Bosnia and Herzegovina
Dalmatia
In preparation for the peace conference that was expected to follow World War I, in the spring of 1917 the British Foreign Office established a special section responsible for preparing background information for use by British delegates to the conference. Dalmatia is Number 11 in a series of more than 160 studies produced by the section, most of which were published after the conclusion of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. At the time this book was written, Dalmatia was a kingdom within the Austro-Hungarian Empire, consisting of about 120 islands ...
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Montenegro
In preparation for the peace conference that was expected to follow World War I, in the spring of 1917 the British Foreign Office established a special section responsible for preparing background information for use by British delegates to the conference. Montenegro is Number 19 in a series of more than 160 studies produced by the section, most of which were published after the conclusion of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. The book includes sections on physical and political geography, political history, social and political conditions, and economic conditions. In the ...
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