17 results in English
Turkestan Krai. Night Lodging Site for Caravans
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
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Turkestan Krai. Night Lodging Site for Caravans
This photograph is from the ethnographical part of Turkestan Album, a comprehensive visual survey of Central Asia undertaken after imperial Russia assumed control of the region in the 1860s. Commissioned by General Konstantin Petrovich von Kaufman (1818–82), the first governor-general of Russian Turkestan, the album is in four parts spanning six volumes: “Archaeological Part” (two volumes); “Ethnographic Part” (two volumes); “Trades Part” (one volume); and “Historical Part” (one volume). The principal compiler was Russian Orientalist Aleksandr L. Kun, who was assisted by Nikolai V. Bogaevskii. The album contains some ...
Contributed by Library of Congress
Southwest Asia
This map of Southwest Asia dating from about 1866 shows the possessions of the European powers in this region. The map extends from Libya, Egypt, and Sudan in the west to Mongolia, China (Tibet), and Burma in the east. Colored lines are used to indicate territories controlled by Britain, France, Portugal, and the Ottoman Empire and to delineate what the map calls the kingdom of the imam of Oman. The names of provincial capitals are underlined. British territories in India are divided into six parts: Bengal, the Northwest Provinces, Panjab ...
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Map of Asian-Eastern Turkey, Persia, Afghanistan, and Arabia
This map, published in Paris in 1842, shows the Asian provinces of the Ottoman Empire, Persia (present-day Iran), Afghanistan, and the Arabian Peninsula. The map appeared in Atlas universel de géographie ancienne et moderne (Universal atlas of ancient and modern geography) by the cartographer and engraver Pierre M. Lapie (1779–1850). Lapie was a member of the corps of topographical engineers in the French army, where he rose to the rank of colonel. He eventually became head of the topographical section in the Ministry of War. He was assisted by ...
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Central Asia: Afghanistan and Her Relation to British and Russian Territories
This 1885 map shows Asia from the eastern littoral of the Mediterranean to western China and the Indian subcontinent. An inset in the upper right depicts the region in the broader context of Asia, Europe, and Africa. A focal point of the map is Afghanistan, where, in what was called “the Great Game,” the Russian and British empires competed for influence throughout most of the 19th century. The British feared that the Russians, who annexed large parts of Central Asia in the 1860s and 1870s, would use Afghanistan as a ...
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A Map of the Countries between Constantinople and Calcutta: Including Turkey in Asia, Persia, Afghanistan and Turkestan
This 1885 map shows the region between Constantinople, capital of the Ottoman Empire, and British India, an area of intense imperial rivalry between the British and Russian Empires in the late-19th century. British possessions are colored in red and include British India, Cyprus, the Aden Protectorate (present-day Yemen), Socotra Island (Yemen), and the northern littoral of the Horn of Africa, which became the protectorate of British Somaliland (present-day Somalia) in 1888. The map shows railroad lines and submarine telegraph cables. The railroad network is at this time more developed in ...
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Iran and Turan: Persia, Afghanistan, Baluchistan, Turkestan
This map of Central Asia appeared in the 1839 edition of Stieler's Hand-Atlas über alle Theile der Erde (Stieler’s portable atlas of all parts of the Earth), edited by Adolf Stieler and published by the firm of Justus Perthes in Gotha, Germany. The map was compiled and drawn in 1829 by Heinrich Karl Wilhelm Berghaus (1797−1884) and updated by him in 1834. The numbered key in the lower right-hand corner of the map indicates the states of the region as they existed in 1834. They included the ...
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Afghanistan
This map of Afghanistan was produced by the Geographical Section of the General Staff of the British Army and issued by the War Office in London in January 1912. It gives the names and locations of districts, mountains, passes, and sources of water. Relief is shown by contours and heights are given in feet. Colors, as explained in the key on the right side of the map, are used to indicate altitude, with the heights shown ranging from sea level to 25,000 feet (7,620 meters) and higher. The ...
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Recommended Facilities for Search and Rescue, Middle East Region
This map was prepared for the Middle East Region Air Navigation Meeting of the Provisional International Civil Aviation Organization (PICAO), which took place in Cairo, Egypt, in October 1946. It shows political borders and recommended facilities for search and rescue, including rescue-coordinating and rescue-alerting centers, bases for different types of search-and-rescue aircraft, and facilities for surface vessels. The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) was established under a convention signed by 52 countries at the November 1944 International Civil Aviation Conference in Chicago. From August 1945 to August 1947, as the ...
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Wyld's Military Staff Map of Central Asia and Afghanistan
This impressively detailed map of Central Asia, dated 1879, was published during the Second Anglo-Afghan War (1878–80) by the British mapmaker James Wyld the younger (1812–87). The map shows the vast domains acquired by the Russian Empire in Central Asia (present-day Turkmenistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, and Uzbekistan) in the late 19th century, as well as Afghanistan, eastern Persia, and parts of Baluchistan (present-day Pakistan), India, and China. The political boundaries shown on the map delineate the khanates of Bukhara, Khiva, and Afghanistan, as well as the borders the Russian ...
Part of Central Asia, Showing the Territory Between Zarafshan and Amu Darya Rivers, Chiefly Compiled from the Latest Russian Documents to Illustrate Mr. Delmar Morgan’s Paper
The map depicts parts of northern Afghanistan and the protectorate of Bukhara (corresponding to portions of modern-day Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, and Kyrgyzstan). It was meant to accompany an article written by Edward Delmar Morgan (1840–1909) as a supplementary paper published by the Royal Geographical Society. Entitled “Notes on the Recent Geography of Central Asia from Russian Sources,” the paper was published in 1884. Morgan was an English explorer and author. As a young man, he lived in Saint Petersburg, where his father was a merchant, and he was fluent in ...
Turkestan. Asia in Ten Folios. Folio II
This 1909 map covers Turkestan, or the domains of Russia in Central Asia, along with adjoining regions in Persia, Afghanistan, British India, and China. Russia had acquired its vast holdings in Central Asia, including the protectorates of Khiva and Bukhara, in the second half of the previous century. The map shows Bokhara as the state capital of Turkestan and Tashkent, present-day capital of Uzbekistan, as the seat of government. This is the second map in a series of ten published by Hachette in the early 1900s as part of the ...
Dress of a Kyrgyz Woman. Everyday Head Scarf.
This portrait of a Kyrgyz woman in traditional dress is contained in Turkestan Album, one of the richest sources of visual information on the cultural monuments of Central Asia as they appeared in the 19th century. This multi-volume work was produced in 1871-72 under the patronage of Konstantin P. von Kaufman, a Russian army general and the first Governor-General of Turkestan, as the Russian Empire's Central Asian holdings were called. Kaufman held that position from 1867 to 1886, during which time he played a major role in establishing Russia ...
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Kyrgyz Wedding Rites. Kyrgyz Groom (groom [Turkish]), Ruzi bai.
This portrait of a Kyrgyz bridegroom, Ruzi-bai, is from Turkestan Album, one of the richest sources of visual information on the cultural monuments of Central Asia as they appeared in the 19th century. This multi-volume work was produced in 1871-72 under the patronage of Konstantin P. Von Kaufman, a Russian army general and the first Governor-General of Turkestan, as the Russian Empire's Central Asian holdings were called. Kaufman held that position from 1867 to 1886, during which time he played a major role in establishing Russia's dominant position ...
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Observing a Solar Eclipse on January 1, 1907, near the Cherniaevo Station in the Tian-Shan Mountains above the Saliuktin Mines. Golodnaia Steppe
This unusual photograph shows preparations for observing a total solar eclipse on January 1 (14 in the Gregorian calendar), 1907, at the Cherniaevo Station settlement near the Saliutkin Mines in the Tian-Shan Mountains. Located in Central Asia near the border between China and present-day Kyrgyzstan, the range derives its name from the Chinese for “celestial mountains.” The first Russian to study the mountains was the noted Russian geographer Peter Semyonov-Tyan-Shansky, who explored the region in 1856 and 1857. The high elevation and clear dry air were ideal for observation purposes ...
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Atlas of Asiatic Russia
This comprehensive atlas of the Asian part of the Russian Empire, published in 1914 by the Resettlement Department of the Land Regulation and Agriculture Administration, provides detailed information about the historical, geographical, and economic characteristics of Russia east of the Ural Mountains. The atlas was created at a time when this territory had received a new impetus to development from the agrarian reforms instituted, beginning in 1906, by Chairman of the Council of Ministers Pyotr N. Stolypin (1862–1911). The atlas is one of the best examples of prerevolutionary Russian ...
Observing a Solar Eclipse on January 1, 1907 near the Cherniaevo Station in the Tian-Shan Mountains above the Saliuktin Mines. Golodnaia Steppe
This unusual photograph shows preparations for observing a total solar eclipse on January 1 (14 in the Gregorian calendar), 1907, at the Cherniaevo Station settlement near the Saliutkin Mines in the Tian-Shan Mountains. Located in Central Asia near the border between China and present-day Kyrgyzstan, the range derives its name from the Chinese for “celestial mountains.” The first Russian to study the mountains was the noted Russian geographer Peter Semyonov-Tyan-Shansky, who explored the region in 1856 and 1857. The high elevation and clear dry air were ideal for observation purposes ...
Contributed by Library of Congress