13 results
Spherical Map That Shows the North of the Santo Domingo Island and the Eastern Part of Canal Viejo of Bahamas
This early-19th century Spanish naval map shows the eastern Caribbean, from the northern coasts of Hispaniola (present-day Haiti and the Dominican Republic) and Cuba to the Bahamas. The map was engraved by Fernando Selma (1752-1810), a well-known Spanish engraver who produced not only maps, but also portraits of notable Spaniards.
Contributed by
National Library of Brazil
Native Drummers
This photograph from Haiti shows two drummers playing on elaborately-decorated drums. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of life and culture in the Americas. Many of the photographs were taken by prominent photographers on OAS missions to member countries. The OAS was established in April 1948 when 21 countries of the western hemisphere adopted the OAS Charter, in which they reaffirmed their commitment to the pursuit of common goals and respect for ...
Contributed by
Columbus Memorial Library, Organization of American States
Dressed for the Big Show
This photograph from Haiti shows a couple fashionably dressed in clothes of a bygone era. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of life and culture in the Americas. Many of the photographs were taken by prominent photographers on OAS missions to member countries. The OAS was established in April 1948 when 21 countries of the western hemisphere adopted the OAS Charter, in which they reaffirmed their commitment to the pursuit of common ...
Contributed by
Columbus Memorial Library, Organization of American States
Dance and Popular Dress
This photograph from Haiti shows four dancers elegantly dressed in old-fashioned clothes. The men wear suits with large stripes and knee-length pants; the women are in flowing gowns with tall head wraps on which hats are perched. They are dancing to the sound of drummers playing on elaborately-decorated drums. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of life and culture in the Americas. Many of the photographs were taken by prominent photographers on ...
Contributed by
Columbus Memorial Library, Organization of American States
Fiesta Dress
This photograph from Haiti shows a group of male and female dancers dressed in colorful costumes while performing a dance outdoors in brilliant sunlight. The men are attired in bold-striped outfits with balloon-bottomed pants and straw hats, the women in floral dresses with tall headwear of matching print. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of life and culture in the Americas. Many of the photographs were taken by prominent photographers on OAS ...
Contributed by
Columbus Memorial Library, Organization of American States
Carnival Costumes
This photograph from Haiti shows two masqueraders in amusing carnival costumes that simultaneously represent both pig and human. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of life and culture in the Americas. Many of the photographs were taken by prominent photographers on OAS missions to member countries. The OAS was established in April 1948 when 21 countries of the western hemisphere adopted the OAS Charter, in which they reaffirmed their commitment to the ...
Contributed by
Columbus Memorial Library, Organization of American States
Santo Domingo, Past and Present, with a Glance at Hayti
Hispaniola was visited and named by Christopher Columbus during his first voyage in 1492. The present-day division of the island into two countries – French- and Creole-speaking Haiti and the Spanish-speaking Dominican Republic – can be traced to the 1697 Treaty of Ryswick, in which Spain recognized French sovereignty over the western third of the island. In 1869, the ruler of the Dominican Republic, by then an independent country, sought to join the United States as a way of dealing with bankruptcy and internal unrest. Secretary of State William H. Seward was ...
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Library of Congress
An Historical Survey of the French Colony in the Island of St. Domingo: Comprehending a Short Account of Its Ancient Government, Political State, Population, Productions, and Exports
In August 1791, slaves in the French colony of Saint-Domingue staged a massive revolt, setting in train the chain of events that ultimately led to the founding of Haiti in 1804. In February 1793, war broke out between Britain and France. In September 1793, British troops landed on Saint-Domingue, intent on restoring order, seizing the colony for Britain, and reinstating slavery. This work by a British author is an account of events in Haiti in 1789-94, based in part on his own first-hand observations. The author concludes his work by ...
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Library of Congress
Defense of the Settlers of Saint Dominique: Or, a Quick Look at the New Declaration of the Rights of Man, Particularly as it Relates to the Colonies
The French Revolution of 1789 had enormous repercussions in France’s Caribbean colonies. In August 1791, slaves in the colony of Saint-Domingue staged a massive revolt, setting in train the chain of events that ultimately led to the founding of Haiti in 1804. In 1792, the de facto government of revolutionary France sent commissioners to the colony to enforce a decree by the National Assembly that enfranchised free blacks and mulattoes, but that did not yet free the colony’s slaves. Under growing pressure from the revolt and threatened by ...
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Library of Congress
An Historical Account of the Black Empire of Hayti: Comprehending a View of the Principal Transactions in the Revolution of Saint Domingo: with Its Ancient and Modern State
Marcus Rainsford was a soldier who served for many years with the British Army in the British West Indies. He visited Haiti in 1799, where he became an admirer of Toussaint L'Ouverture, the former slave who led Haiti’s revolution and struggle to end slavery. This book is Rainsford’s account of the slave uprising that began in August 1791 and the subsequent fighting that, at different times, involved French, Spanish, and British troops and various factions in Haiti. The book includes the first known representations of Toussaint, which ...
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Library of Congress
Map of the Islands of Hispaniola and Puerto Rico
Joan Vinckeboons (1617–70) was a Dutch cartographer and engraver born into a family of artists of Flemish origin. He was in the employ of the Dutch West India Company and for more than 30 years produced maps for use by Dutch mercantile and military shipping. He was a business partner of Joan Blaeu, one of the most important map and atlas publishers of the day. Vinckeboons drew a series of 200 manuscript maps that were used in the production of atlases, including Blaeu’s Atlas Major. This circa 1639 ...
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Library of Congress
Emblems of Liberty and Humanity. The Red Cross, Mother of All Nations
This French-language poster is one in a series issued by the American Red Cross during World War I featuring the flags of the countries allied or associated with the United States in the war. This poster shows two Red Cross nurses. One nurse, depicted as a Madonna figure, cradles in her arms a wounded soldier on a litter between the flags of Haiti and the United States. The title reads: “Symboles de la liberté et de l'humanité. La Croix Rouge, la mère de toutes les nations.” (Emblems of liberty ...
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Library of Congress
About the Natural History of the Indies
Gonzalo Fernández de Oviedo (1478–1557) was one of the most important early chroniclers of the Spanish presence in the Americas. Born in Madrid of noble parents from Asturias, at age 12 he became a page to the Duke of Villahermosa. He witnessed the surrender of Granada and, in 1492, entered the service of Prince Don Juan I, whose death in 1497 changed the path of his life. After living several years in Italy, Oviedo returned to Spain around 1505 and, from then onward, began traveling between the Iberian Peninsula ...
Contributed by
National Library of Spain