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Map of Lesser Antilles
Joan Vinckeboons (1617–70) was a Dutch cartographer and engraver born into a family of artists of Flemish origin. He was employed by the Dutch West India Company and for more than 30 years produced maps for use by Dutch mercantile and military shipping. He was a business partner of Joan Blaeu, one of the most important map and atlas publishers of the day. Vinckeboons drew a series of 200 manuscript maps that were used in the production of atlases, including Blaeu’s Atlas Maior. This pen-and-ink and watercolor map ...
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Library of Congress
Map of the Whole of Guiana or the Savage Coast, and the Spanish West Indies at the Northern End of South America
This 18th-century Dutch map, produced in Amsterdam by the publisher Isaak Tirion (circa 1705–circa 1769), shows the northern coast of South American and its offshore islands, including Curaçao, Bonaire, and neighboring islands; Trinidad and Tobago; and Grenada. Guiana is divided, from west to east, into Spanish, Dutch, and French sections, corresponding roughly to a part of present-day Venezuela and present-day Guyana, Suriname, and French Guiana. The territory to the south of Guiana, in present-day Brazil, is labeled as Portuguese. Three scales are given in the main map: French and ...
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Columbus Memorial Library, Organization of American States
Carnival
This photograph from Grenada shows a young girl in a shiny costume and crown, in a carnival band. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of life and culture in the Americas. Many of the photographs were taken by prominent photographers on OAS missions to member countries. The OAS was established in April 1948 when 21 countries of the western hemisphere adopted the OAS Charter, in which they reaffirmed their commitment to the ...
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Columbus Memorial Library, Organization of American States
Dance Performance
This photograph from Grenada shows two young men performing a representational dance, watched by onlookers. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of life and culture in the Americas. Many of the photographs were taken by prominent photographers on OAS missions to member countries. The OAS was established in April 1948 when 21 countries of the western hemisphere adopted the OAS Charter, in which they reaffirmed their commitment to the pursuit of common ...
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Columbus Memorial Library, Organization of American States
Shangó Ceremony
This photograph from Grenada shows a group of onlookers at the performance of a Shango ceremony. In African mythology, Shango was elevated from famous warrior and king of the Yoruba of the Oyo Kingdom to the god of thunder and lightning. The Shango ceremonies performed in Latin American and the Caribbean are based on the traditional Shango ceremony of ancient Oyo. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of life and culture in ...
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Columbus Memorial Library, Organization of American States
Independence Day
This photograph shows a parade of police in ceremonial dress on February 7, 1974, Grenada's Independence Day. The photograph is from the collection of the Columbus Memorial Library of the Organization of American States (OAS), which includes 45,000 photographs illustrative of life and culture in the Americas. Many of the photographs were taken by prominent photographers on OAS missions to member countries. The OAS was established in April 1948 when 21 countries of the western hemisphere adopted the OAS Charter, in which they reaffirmed their commitment to the ...
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Columbus Memorial Library, Organization of American States
Map of the Attack and the Taking of the Island of Grenada on July 3, 1779
The islands of Grenada, Dominica, St. Vincent, the Grenadines, and Tobago were ceded by France to Britain following the close of the Seven Years' War (1756-63). France temporarily recaptured these islands in the late 1770s during the period of the U.S. Revolutionary War, a conflict that had hemispheric implications. This elegant, well-executed French military map of the vicinity of St. George's and the harbor depicts the July 1779 French attack on British-held Grenada. The map includes coastline, coastal features, anchorages, a grid of St. George's, other settlements ...
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Library of Congress
Spherical Map of the Granada Island
This map of the Caribbean island of Grenada was prepared in 1793 by cartographers aboard the Spanish naval ships Descubridor and Vigilante. The map indicates the coastline, coastal features, soundings, navigational hazards, settlements, and characteristics of the water bottom. The map is part of the Library of Congress’s collection from the Real Escuela de Navegación, Cadiz, Spain, acquired from Maggs Brothers, London. Several times during the 18th century, Grenada was the scene of fighting between the European naval powers. In 1762, during the Seven Years' War, the British captured ...
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Library of Congress
In Praise of the Most Serene Ferdinand, King of Spain, 'Baetic' and Ruler of Granada, Besieger, Victor, Triumphant: And On the Recently Discovered Islands in the Indian Sea
This book is a compilation of two texts, both relating to events in the momentous year of 1492. The first is a drama in Latin by an Italian author, Carlo Verardi (Carolus Verardus), written in a combination of verse and prose, which recounts the military campaign during the reign of King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella to capture Granada, the last Moorish territory on the Iberian Peninsula. The annexation of Granada marked the end of eight centuries of Muslim rule in Spain and Portugal and concluded the long struggle known in ...
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Library of Congress