29 results in English
Destruction by Fire of Pennsylvania Hall. On the Night of the 17th May, 1838
This dramatic print shows the destruction of Pennsylvania Hall, a large building that was constructed in 1837–38 at Sixth and Haines Streets in Philadelphia as a meeting place for local abolitionist (antislavery) groups. Dedication ceremonies began on May 14, 1838, and continued over several days in a climate of growing hostility from anti-abolitionist forces in the city. On the night of May 17, 1838, an anti-abolitionist mob stormed the hall and set it on fire. Fire companies refused to fight the blaze, and the building was completely destroyed. A ...
Girard College
This lithograph shows a view of Founder's Hall at Girard College in Philadelphia, which was constructed in 1833–47 from designs by Philadelphia architect Thomas Ustick Walters. The hall occupied a site between what became Girard Avenue and Ridge Avenue at Corinthian Avenue. Girard College was established through a bequest from Stephen Girard, a Philadelphia financier and philanthropist, for the creation of a school for poor white male orphans. The illustration is by John Caspar Wild (circa 1804–46), a Swiss-born artist and lithographer, who arrived in Philadelphia from ...
The Girard College, Philadelphia
This lithograph shows an exterior view of Girard College at Girard Avenue, Philadelphia, including Founder's Hall and the eastern and western outbuildings. The school buildings, designed by Philadelphia architect Thomas Ustick Walter in the Greek Revival style, were constructed in 1833–47. Girard College was established through a bequest from Stephen Girard, a Philadelphia financier and philanthropist, for the creation of a school for poor white male orphans. The illustration is by John Caspar Wild (circa 1804–46), a Swiss-born artist and lithographer, who arrived in Philadelphia from Paris ...
Pennsylvania Hall
This print is an exterior view of the abolitionist meeting place and adjacent buildings at Sixth and Haines Streets in Philadelphia. Several pedestrians stroll the sidewalks. A carriage and horse-drawn cart pass by on the street. The hall, erected in 1838 as an arena for "free discussion," was set aflame by hostile mobs on May 17, 1838, after three days of dedication ceremonies and services involving both free blacks and white abolitionists. The ruins of the building continued to stand until the Odd Fellows Society built a hall on the ...
Fairmount Waterworks. Pictorial Embellishment of the Philadelphia Saturday Courier
This lithograph of the Fairmount Waterworks, on the Schuylkill River in Philadelphia, shows one of America’s earliest municipal water-treatment systems. Powered consecutively by steam engines, waterwheels, and pumps that lifted water to reservoirs on a hill (Faire Mount), the waterworks and its beautiful setting were a tourist attraction from the beginning. The plant was designed by Frederick Graff, and the result was an innovative engineering success and beautiful buildings reflecting the contemporary fashion for Greek Revival architecture. This print is by John Caspar Wild (circa 1804-46) a Swiss-born artist ...
U.S. Mint, Philadelphia
This lithograph print shows the second building of the United States Mint, which needed more space for its rising production than was afforded by its first structure. The new Mint opened in 1833 and was designed by William Strickland (1788–1854) in the early Greek Revival style. It is a simple building with two stories and a basement. Its wide flight of stairs, portico, and Ionic columns appear both dignified and inviting. The print is by John Caspar Wild (circa 1804−46) a Swiss-born artist and lithographer, who arrived in ...
United States Bank, Chestnut Street, Philadelphia
This lithograph shows the United States Bank, also called the Second Bank of the United States (because it was the second federally authorized national bank), on the 400 block of the south side of Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Its functions included regulation of the currency and handling fiscal transactions for the U.S. government. The bank was constructed in 1818−24 to designs by Philadelphia architect William Strickland (1787–1854) and was one of the first Greek Revival buildings in the country, apparently modeled on the Parthenon in Athens. The building ...
Saint John's Church, Philadelphia
This print shows an exterior view of the Gothic-style Roman Catholic Church, Saint John the Evangelist, located at 23–25 South 13th Street in Philadelphia. The church opened for services in April 1832. The print shows parishioners walking up the steps of the building and two women conversing on the sidewalk. An iron fence protects the building. The print was originally published as plate 19 in Views of Philadelphia, and Its Vicinity, published by the firm J.C. Wild & J.B. Chevalier, Lithographers (Philadelphia, 1838). The lithographic stones for the ...
State House. Philadelphia
This lithographic print shows the State House (Independence Hall) on Chestnut Street between 5th and 6th Streets in Philadelphia. Completed in 1753, to designs by Edmund Woolley and Andrew Hamilton, it first served as the colonial legislature for Pennsylvania. The building is best known as the site where the Declaration of Independence was adopted in 1776. The Greek Revival facade shown here was added by architect John Haviland in 1830. The print is by John Caspar Wild (circa 1804-46), a Swiss-born artist and lithographer who arrived in Philadelphia from Paris ...
The Eastern Penitentiary
This hand-colored lithograph shows a view looking over farmland toward the Eastern Penitentiary of Pennsylvania. In the foreground, a man and two boys survey the pastoral scene before the splendid gothic prison building. The penitentiary was built in 1823–36 after the designs of John Haviland and opened in an unfinished state in 1829. Located at 2101–99 Fairmount Avenue, it was one of the largest and most expensive structures of its day and was most unusual in having flush toilets and heating in the cells. The print is by ...
Fairmount
This landscape view looking west from Reservoir Hill in Philadelphia shows the Fairmount Water Works, originally constructed between 1812 and 1822 after the designs of Philadelphia chief engineer Frederick Graff. Built to supply the expanding city with safe drinking water, the works included an engine house, mill house, and a millrace bridge. Visitors are seen strolling on the landscaped grounds of the works and rowers are visible on the nearby Schuylkill River. Also depicted are residences, probably including Lemon Hill, the Schuylkill Canal lock, and the river dam. The illustration ...
View from the Inclined Plane, near Philadelphia
This circa 1840 print shows the view looking east down the inclined plane cut into Belmont Hill (Fairmount Park) for hauling railroad cars from the Schuylkill River in Philadelphia to Columbia on the Philadelphia and Columbia Railroad. Two men watch the cars being hauled by cables from within the plane. The covered Columbia Railroad Bridge over the Schuylkill, completed in 1834, is visible in the background. In the foreground is a heavily wooded landscape, with the cityscape in the distance. The plane connecting the river with the rail line was ...
Philadelphia from the Navy Yard
The shipyard at Front Street on the Delaware River in the Southwark section of Philadelphia became operational in 1776. In 1801 it became the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard and the first official base of the United States Navy. The larger ironclad warships introduced into the navy after the American Civil War required more space, and in 1871 the shipyard moved to League Island at the confluence of the Schuylkill and Delaware Rivers. This print by John Caspar Wild (circa 1804−46) shows the Delaware bustling with an assortment of vessels, including ...
U.S. Naval Asylum
The main building of the U.S. Naval Asylum (Biddle Hall) was designed by William Strickland (1787–1854) in 1826 and completed in 1833. Strickland was one of the first architects of the Greek Revival style in the United States and also a civil engineer. The columns on the asylum’s balconies were an innovative use of cast-iron as a building material. The U.S. Navy commissioned the building to house officers and seamen who had been disabled on duty as well as elderly and impoverished naval personnel. This print ...
Custom House. Late U.S. Bank
This view looking east shows the Custom House, formerly the Second Bank of the United States, built in 1821–24 after the designs of William Strickland (1788–1854) at 420 Chestnut Street in Philadelphia. Also visible is the neighboring Bank of Philadelphia, completed in 1837, also after the designs of Strickland, at 400–408 Chestnut Street. Pedestrians traverse the sidewalks in front of the banks and across from the buildings. Couples promenade and greet each other and patrons convene in front of the Bank of Philadelphia. Also seen are two ...
Alms House. Philadelphia
This 1840s print shows the Blockley Alms House in Philadelphia, as seen from the east bank of the Schuylkill River. It includes the Market Street Bridge, Beck’s shot tower (a city landmark since 1808) and, in the far distance, the Eastern State Penitentiary. William Strickland (1788–1854), a founder of Greek Revival architecture in the United States, designed the quadrangle of four large buildings that formed the almshouse. The original Philadelphia Alms House was constructed in the early 1730s and was the first multifunctional government-sponsored institution for the care ...
Pennsylvania Institution for the Instruction of the Blind
This print is an exterior view of the Pennsylvania Institution for the Instruction of the Blind, located at the corner of at Sassafras (now Race) and Schuylkill Third (20th) Streets in Philadelphia. The school was established in 1832 by Julius Reinhold Friedlander (1803–1839), a young German teacher of blind and visually impaired children, shortly after his arrival in the city. Within a year, the school had a constitution and board of managers. Several years later, it moved into this new building. The view shown here includes pedestrians strolling in ...
Pennsylvania Hospital
This print shows an exterior view from the southeast of the Pennsylvania Hospital, located on Pine Street between 8th and 9th Streets in Philadelphia. The street scene in the foreground includes a carriage, a wagon, riders on horseback including a woman riding sidesaddle, pedestrians, and a watchman's guardhouse. Benjamin Franklin helped raise funds for the first Pennsylvania Hospital building, the east wing, which was designed by Samuel Rhoads and constructed in 1755 on a site that was then far from the smells and noise of the city center. Rhoads ...
University of Pennsylvania
This lithograph shows the twin buildings of the University of Pennsylvania, Medical Hall and College Hall, located on the west side of 9th Street between Market and Chestnut Streets in Philadelphia. The view includes a group of students gathered in a doorway, two women carrying parasols, and other pedestrians. Designed by Philadelphia architect William Strickland (1788–1854) and constructed in 1829–30, the buildings housed the university until its removal to West Philadelphia in the 1870s. Strickland was one of the first architects of the Greek Revival style in the ...
Market Street, from Front Street
This lithograph shows the active, business-lined street containing the New Jersey Market terminus in Philadelphia, named after its central location to the ferries from New Jersey, the city's main provider of farm produce. Market shoppers, purveyors of goods, and pedestrians, including African Americans, stroll the streets and sidewalks and pack the market shed topped with a cupola and clock. Peddlers sell their goods from carts on Front Street. Built in 1822, the market operated twice weekly until the abolition of street markets in 1859. A bell on Front Street ...
Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia
In the 1830s, a group of influential Philadelphians wanted to establish a rural cemetery that would be naturalistic, serene, and in genteel seclusion. They settled on Laurel Hill at 3822 Ridge Avenue, the former estate of merchant Joseph Sims, which had rocky bluffs and spectacular views and was about six kilometers from the city center. The cemetery was built in 1836–39 after the designs of Scottish-born architect and landscape designer John Notman. This view shows the main gate. A man on horseback rides past the cemetery, in which the ...
Manayunk near Philadelphia
This lithograph shows the textile village of Manayunk along the east bank of the Schuylkill River, northwest of Philadelphia. The townscape includes Joseph Ripka's cotton mills, which were erected in 1831 and 1835 and were part of one of the largest textile businesses in the United States at the time. In the background is Flat Rock Turnpike Bridge, a long covered bridge that stood from 1810 to 1850. Manayunk’s plentiful water supply and good transport links made it important in the nation’s industrial revolution. The village was ...
Merchants' Exchange
This lithograph shows the view looking northeast from the intersection of Dock, Third, and Walnut Streets in Philadelphia to the Merchants' Exchange. Built between 1832 and 1833 to the designs of William Strickland (1788–1854), the exchange functioned as a commercial and financial hub and post office and was the first large central building in Philadelphia for the conduct of business. Men are seen walking around and horse-drawn omnibuses arrive at and are parked in front of the building. Light pedestrian traffic is visible in the street and at the ...
Moyamensing Prison
This view shows the prison built in 1832−35 after the designs of Thomas Ustick Walter (1804−87) at Tenth and Reed Streets in Philadelphia. A horse-drawn wagon used to carry convicts, known as a Black Maria, draws toward the front of the Gothic-style building. Two men watch the carriage from near the road and two others are visible close to one of the battlement towers. The prison, which operated under a system of solitary confinement, was demolished in 1968. The print was originally published as Plate 9 in Views ...
Merchant's Hotel, Number 38, North Fourth Street, Philadelphia
This advertisement shows the front facade of the five-story hotel with balcony built in 1837 at 38 North Fourth Street in Philadelphia after the designs of William Strickland (1788–1854). The name of the proprietor, Sanderson, i.e., Joseph M. Sanderson, adorns the entranceway. Also shown is the hat shop of Lazel Elmes, a tenant in the building. A display of hats adorns the doorway to the shop. Merchant's Hotel was a premier early 19th-century hotel that was visited by several presidents and used as the presidential campaign headquarters ...
Panorama of Philadelphia from the State House Steeple. East
This print is a panoramic view of Philadelphia as seen looking east toward the Delaware River from the State House (Independence Hall) steeple. The area of the city shown is mainly east of Fifth Street between Arch and South Streets. The numbered key indicates 11 landmarks visible in the print: (1) the Court House, i.e. City Hall; (2) the Philadelphia Library, i.e., Library Company of Philadelphia; (3) United States Bank, i.e., Second Bank of the United States; (4) Philadelphia Bank; (5) Girard Bank; (6) Pennsylvania Bank; (7 ...
Panorama of Philadelphia from the State House Steeple. North
This print is a panoramic view of Philadelphia as seen looking north toward North Philadelphia from the State House (Independence Hall) steeple. The area of the city shown is mainly north of Chestnut Street between the Delaware River and 25th Street. The numbered key indicates five landmarks visible in the print: (1) Saint Augustine Church; (2) Girard College; (3) Zion Church; (4) Franklin Square, between Race, Vine, North Sixth, and North Franklin Streets; and (5) Pennsylvania Hall. The north side of the 500 block of Chestnut Street, with several businesses ...
Panorama of Philadelphia from the State House Steeple. South
This print is a panoramic view of Philadelphia as seen looking south toward the Delaware River from the State House (Independence Hall) steeple. The area of the city shown is mainly between Independence Square, the river, and about 8th Street. The numbered key indicates seven landmarks visible in the print: (1) the Navy Yard at Southwark; (2) Shot Tower; (3) Philadelphia Prison, i.e., Moyamensing Prison; (4) Albert Barnes Church, i.e., First Presbyterian Church; (5) Pennsylvania Hospital; (6) Washington Square, between Sixth, Eighth, Walnut, and Spruce Streets; and (7 ...
Panorama of Philadelphia from the State House Steeple. West
This print is a panoramic view of Philadelphia as seen looking west toward West Philadelphia past the Schuylkill River. It mainly shows the area of the city between Arch Street and Gray's Ferry Avenue. Printed below the image is a partial key to eight of 15 (1-4, 8-12) landmarks visible in the print: (1) U.S. Naval Asylum; (2) [Blockley] Alms House; (3) Peale's Museum; (4) Walnut Street Theatre; (5) Cook's Circus, i.e., Thomas Cooke's equestrian circus; (6) Saint John's Church, i.e., Saint ...