4 results
Treatise on Friendship
You lun (Treatise on friendship), also entitled Jiao you lun (Treatise on making friends), is by the Jesuit missionary Matteo Ricci (1552–1610), who also added a Latin title, De Amicitia. Written for the general non-Christian Chinese reader, it elaborates on the concept of virtuous friendship and reflects Ricci’s efforts to bring Renaissance and humanist culture to China. According to Si ku quan shu ti yao (Annotated bibliography of the Imperial Library), the work was recommended by Qu Rukui (born 1549), a member of a noted family of officials ...
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National Central Library
Work on Trigonometry
This work is a treatise on trigonometry by Li Madou, the Chinese name of the Italian Jesuit Matteo Ricci (1552–1610). Ricci left for China in 1581 and arrived in Macao in 1582. Together with Luo Mingjian (Michele Ruggieri, 1543–1607), he began his mission in Zhaoqing, Guangdong Province, where he published his Wan guo yu tu (Map of 10,000 countries), which was well received by Chinese scholars. He was expelled from Zhaoqing and went to Jiangxi, where in 1596 he became the superior of the mission. He lived ...
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National Central Library
Great Universal Geographic Map
Matteo Ricci was born in Macerata, Italy, in 1552. In 1571, he entered the Society of Jesus and began his novitiate at the College of Rome, where he studied theology and philosophy as well as mathematics, cosmology, and astronomy. In 1577, Ricci asked to be sent as a missionary to Asia. He arrived in Portuguese Goa (present-day India) in September 1578, where he was ordained in July 1580. He worked in Goa and in Cochin (present-day Kochi, India) for four years, until he was summoned to join the fledgling Jesuit ...
Contributed by
James Ford Bell Library, University of Minnesota
Treatise on Geometry
Yuan rong jiao yi (Treatise on geometry) is an 1847 edition of a work dictated in 1608 by the Italian Jesuit Matteo Ricci (1552–1610) to official and scholar Li Zhizao (1565–1630). Ricci, whose Chinese name was Li Madou, was one of the founding figures of the Jesuit mission in China. Li Zhizao was baptized by Ricci in 1610 and took the name Leo. He studied with Ricci and wrote prefaces to a number of his books. Ricci dictated several works to Li, who put them into acceptable Chinese ...
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National Central Library