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For the Voice
For the Voice, a collection of poems by Vladimir Mayakovsky (1893–1930), was published in Berlin in 1923 in collaboration with the artist Lazar Lisitskii (better known as El Lisitski, 1890–1941). The poems were meant to be read aloud and reflected themes favored by Mayakovsky in the period after the Russian Revolution of 1917: anger with the idle and satiated bourgeoisie, compassion for the struggle of the common people, and the call for an “army of the arts” to help fight the struggle against the old order. The book ...
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National Library of Russia
The Austrians Cursed Loudly near the Carpathian Mountains
This World War I propaganda poster, created by Vladimir Mayakovsky (1893–1930), depicts Austrian soldiers retreating from the 1914 Russian invasion of Galicia, near the Carpathian Mountains. The terrified Austrians are pursued by the victorious Russian cavalry. With limited colors and basic contour drawing the artist achieves a simple and comical picture. The strength of the Russians is emphasized by a long file of mounted soldiers, their commander boldly charging the enemy and brandishing his saber. In the early stages of the war, a number of Russian avant-garde artists, including ...
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National Library of Russia
A Sausage Maker Came to Lodz. We Said to Him: "Welcome, Sir!...”
This World War I propaganda poster, by Kazimir Malevich in collaboration with Vladimir Mayakovsky, depicts a Russian peasant and the German Army he is portrayed as having defeated. The oversized peasant on the left panel is greeting the German emperor, who moves towards him with his army of cheerful soldiers, confident of victory. On the right side, the peasant walks away after having crushed the enemy. With his army destroyed, the emperor is dismayed. The verse by Mayakovsky below the images reads: “A sausage maker came to Lodz. We said ...
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National Library of Russia